The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

My new spiral mixer

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driechel's picture
driechel

My new spiral mixer

Hello everyone,


yesterday my new spiral mixer arrived. I ordered it in Italy and me living in the Netherlands had to wait for over week for it to arrive. (DHL didn't understand my adress notation!) Anyway my patiences paid of. I cannot emphasize enough how happy I am with this mixer. After years of trying different mixer (all planetary) I hoped that I finally found the right mixer for me. And I can tell you I am pretty sure this is the one!
It is a spiral mixer with moving bowl and central shaft. It can mix from 500 grams up to 3000 grams of flour (so 5 kg of dough depending on amount of water). The engine is only 370 watt but the deep low sound it makes is uncomparable with my old kenwood chef of 800 watt (ok I have to admit that this mixer only has one gear and the kenwood has many more).
It took me 3 years to find out that a spiral mixer with a household size existed, so that is why I like to share it with you all. Maybe I can inspire some others.


For those interested here is a link to a movie I made of the mixer at work:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTmrH_Ni6nE&feature=channel_page


 


It comes from this store:


http://www.salvatoregreco.com/
Click on kneading machines. It is the IMC5E model. (the smallest)

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

See, this is what I'd rather have than a regular KitchenAid or even a DLX...but finding used ones is proving to be problematic. The largest I'd want is a 12 quart Hobart and those seem to be the hardest to find.


So what brand is yours? I'm very curious about it.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I'm happy for you finding a new mixer that suits your needs. It looks like a very capable device and simple construction. In the description it says the bowl is fixed. Does this mean the bowl does not come off for cleaning? I have wondered how they clean the large mixers in a commercial bakery. At some point the bowls get heavy and cumbersome.


So mix up a big batch of bagels and invite us over!


Eric

bostonphotobill's picture
bostonphotobill

I have a small spiral mixer on order from TMB Baking. I was told today that it will ship next week. I'll report back after I have used it for a few mixes.


http://www.tmbbaking.com/sp5.html

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Hello,

That SP5 you have ordered from TMB is a great mixer. I've had one for 6 years now, and, except for replacing a very inexpensive fuse, it has given me no trouble. Just be sure to use the "double hydration method" to mix very wet doughs like ciabatta.

I am fascinated with the "breaker bar" in the center of the other mixer purchased by our Dutch friend above. That's a nice feature to have -- might take too long to explain here, but I see it as an advantage. I have no experience using that mixer, but I wish I could try it.

By the way, the mixer bowl is probably not removable. That's definitely a disadvantage in its use, but these small spiral mixers handle 8 or sometimes 10 pounds of dough with no effort, and the results you achieve are quite comparable to what professional artisans get in their dough. The KitchenAids are fine for most pastry and confectionary work, but heavy bread dough really taxes them.

--Dan DiMuzio

qahtan's picture
qahtan


The large 8 quart stainless steel bowl of the Magic Mill holds up to 28 cups of flour (7 lbs.), to make approximately 15 lbs. of bread dough (7-10 loaves). The efficient, high-torque 600 watt motor runs smoothly and quietly; coupled with an advanced transmission design, it providing ample power to mix and knead even the largest batch of heavy bread dough without straining. The Magic Mill was given its nickname, "The Workhorse Mixer" not by its manufacturer Electrolux, but by users who praise this powerful kitchen helper that's so enjoyable to use.


 


                       qahtan


flournwater's picture
flournwater

Inasmuch as none of the dealers/manufacturers I've reviewed want to advertise their prices up front I suspect the cost of one of these machines in clearly out of reach for all but the most serios (and probably professional) bread maker.

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Well . . . the SP5 was selling for about a grand or so in 2003, but with inflation and the drop in the dollar it's probably gone up a bit.  People who take classes at SFBI (the school owned by TMB Baking) get a discount . . . it was 10%, I think, when I bought mine.


Guys and gals . . . this is no toy.  It weighs 75-80 pounds, I think.  Designed to be a professional lab mixer for use in large baking facilities, schools, flour testing facilities and so on.


I couldn't afford to get one now, but I'm glad I could afford it then.


Please don't think I'm suggesting that getting a better mixer automatically makes you a better baker.  But . . when you get to a point where you can honestly say a planetary mixer doesn't do what you need it to do . . . you go toy shopping.  Master your fundamentals first with what you have before deciding to lay out that kind of dough.

driechel's picture
driechel

The bowl indeed is not removable. This makes cleaning much harder, but for me this is not problem.

So to be totally honest maybe I should mention the property's that others could see as disadvantages:

- bowl is not removable
- the machine weighs 33 kg


The price I paid is 633 euro.


 


Qahtan, this was just a post to show people my spiral mixer. It has nothing to with comparing to others or which is better. Just putting a qoute in someones post without making your intentions clear, in my eyes is a little superfluous. It would me more helpfull to make a movie your nice machine in action and post it, because I think there is way to few movies of mixing machines. If we all make a movie of our mixer in actios it will be much easier for people to choose their mixer in the future.

mike owens's picture
mike owens

can you clarify some of your post,  i thought i knew what a planetary mixer was but now i am not so sure.  i have been grinding my own wheat and kneading by hand for 10 years now but i want to start making bigger quantities and it's wearing out my hands so i started mixer shopping. your post has me curious about the effects of mixer motion on dough outcomes. thanks in advance for any info.  mike

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Hi Mike,


Any KitchenAid countertop mixer I've ever seen is a planetary mixer.  So are most Hobarts, Kenwoods, or Vikings.


The term "planetary" refers to the motion of the post where you attach the mixer's dough hook, a paddle, or a whip.  If you have one of these mixers, when you turn it on you'll see that the attachment doesn't merely spin, but also orbits around the circumference of the fixed bowl, which ensures a good distribution of ingredients and/or incorporation of air in many applications.


Planetary mixers are great for some things, like whipping cream or egg whites, creaming butter and sugar with a paddle, mixing cake batters or cookie doughs.  They aren't the best for bread dough, though.  In the case of home-intended 5qt KitchenAid's, for instance, the motors aren't powerful enough to withstand so much drag from a dense dough on a frequent basis, and some very dense doughs like challah or bagels will sometimes make them burn out.


That may not happen right away, but I've used them in culinary situations where they were operated every day, 5 days a week and in only 1 or 2 years their motors were toast.  If you don't use them for bread dough and just limit their use to soft batters and so forth, they can last a long time and do very well.  If you're pretty much stuck with using a KitchenAid type of planetary mixer for bread dough, you may want to check out Steve Brandt's blog http://www.breadcetera.com/ and explore a bit.  He has developed a mixing technique specifically for KitchenAid mixers that seems to get the most out of the mixer without destroying the motor or the dough.


Even larger, professional quality planetary mixers aren't ideal for bread dough.  They certainly do a more powerful job than most 5qt KitcheAid's, but they tend to slap the dough around the bowl as they mix, and this can be more action on the dough than you want.


Many bakers feel that a much better option for dedicated dough mixing is a spiral-type of mixer (http://www.tmbbaking.com/sp5.html), where the dough hook spins in one spot -- no orbiting -- and the bowl spins on its axis instead of being fixed.  These mixers are generally efficient, powerful, and yet relatively gentle on the dough.  The link I listed there is just one brand of tabletop spiral -- I think there are other links in this thread that can direct you to other options.


Hope that clears it up for you.


--Dan DiMuzio

mike owens's picture
mike owens

that was fantastic.  so putting KA's aside,  it is enlightening that even pro strength mixers with the planetary motion are less effective than just the spiral motion.  i just bought a dlx, probably wasn't my first choice but i got a smokin deal on craigslist (220.00), but thanks a ton for the lesson.  mike

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

I have never seen a mixer like this before. How many speeds does it have?Thanks for posting this.

bostonphotobill's picture
bostonphotobill

The SP5 has only one speed.

Jenady's picture
Jenady

This is taken from the product description of this machine, "This model has liftable head and removable bowl for a better and easy cleaning."

driechel's picture
driechel

This one also has only one speed. That is probably where it gets it strength from.
This is the kind of mixer that most bakeries use. If you read instructions for mixing in for example books like, bread from hamelman, and they are refering to a spiral mixer, then this machine is exactly what they mean. So now when he says mix for 4 minutes or 900 revolutions, I know that with this mixer I have to mix almost exactly 4 minutes. I think this can help me get more consistency in my proces. But of course this is all personal.

qahtan's picture
qahtan

Here you go, movie of DLX machine in action.


 takes a few minutes to view the whole movie but worth the time... ;-)))))  qahtan


          http://www.everythingkitchens.com/electroluxvideo.html


 

ronrath28's picture
ronrath28

Anyone have any videos of the SP5 in action?  What is the best way to clean the bowl/hook on the mixers where they are not removable?


Thanks,


Ron

ronrath28's picture
ronrath28

If anyone is interested I posted a short video of my new SP5 on YouTube at www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYBF1V30B78.

SteveB's picture
SteveB

ronrath28, thanks for posting that very informative video.  I was very curious to see how efficiently the SP5 mixes without the presence of a breaker bar.


SteveB


http://www.breadcetera.com