The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Looking for dry sprouted wheat grain in it's whole form

  • Pin It
Monstergirl's picture
Monstergirl

Looking for dry sprouted wheat grain in it's whole form

Anyone know if dry sprouted wheat grain is available in whole form?  

I like using sprouted wheat flour for it's nutritional value.  I hear that the dehydrated sprouted wheat in it's whole form retains most of it's nutrition, and can be stored up to 7 years.  However, several days after milling it oxidizes and loses nutrition.  So it sounds ideal that I would want to store dry whole sprouted wheat for milling at home when I need it.  Then why in the world can't I find it?  I'm sure there's a good reason, and I appreciate any information anyone may have out there!  Thanks so much!

Shannon-  experimenting, and fascinated!

suave's picture
suave

It is commonly available at homebrewing supply stores under the name wheat malt.

althetrainer's picture
althetrainer

Is it possible to sprout the grains then dry them at home for home baking?  Just curious.

suave's picture
suave

Sure, why not, people do it all the time.  I, myself, am not particularly excited about having to sprout, dry and clean the grain when the commercial product is so inexpensive, but if you have a bag of wheat on hand there's no harm in trying.

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

HI


 I can do this for you. I usually sell the flour I make from the sprouted grains but have done the dried sprouted grains for customers.


www.organicwheatproducts.com


 

Monstergirl's picture
Monstergirl

Thanks Suave, I knew there was something I was missing!  Thanks for filling in the blank.  Now to call up some home brewing stores!


Sprouting, dehydrating, then milling the grains is what I had read about and was starting to experiment with.  But ya, I'd much rather buy dry sprouted grain than sprout it myself if it's available.


Thanks again!

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

I just sent you a message regarding this.

Monstergirl's picture
Monstergirl

Thanks Rhonda for the post, and I can't wait to play with my fresh milled flours ;)  I'd much rather purchase from a small wheat farm than a home brewery shop!

katecollins's picture
katecollins

No worries, the most amazing sprouted 100% whole grain wheat and spelt flours are being produced by Essential Eating. When grains are sprouted they are converted into plants and plants digest as vegetables in our bodies!  Their flours are distributed and sold by Shiloh Farms. The flour can be used one for one in place of all-purpose flours and are available in most health food stores and some major grocery stores such as Wegmans on the East Coast.


And here is the best news and a correction to conventional wisdom about sprouted grain flours.  When a grain is sprouted the endosperm actually eats the germ cell to make the sprout happen.  The germ is what makes traditional flours go rancid and the absence of it in sprouted flour makes it stable.  Sprouted grain flour does not lose it's nutritional value after it has been milled.  And when sprouted the bitter taste of whole grains is converted into an amazing tasting flour.  Essenital Eating Sprouted flours are shelf stable for about six months.


It is the only flour I use and have lost 35 pounds and feel great.


 

katecollins's picture
katecollins

For sprouted whole grain flours check out essentialeating.com.  Unique Pretzel Bakery now uses Essenial Eating Sprouted Flour to make 100% whole grain sprouted pretzels.  Delicious.  Most whole grain products on the market contain only a small percentage of whole grain as unsprouted whole grain flour is very bitter.  The reason you can use 100% whole grain sprouted flour is that the sprouting process removes the bitter taste. 

Monstergirl's picture
Monstergirl

Nutrition and weight loss is exactly what got me reading up on the subject, and in the course of a week and a half, I've been obsessed and dreaming in wheat!  My boyfriend thinks I'm crazy as I start preaching the benefits of sprouted grains... and then he tastes my fresh homemade sprouted tortilla's and he shuts up :)


I won't buy bread in a grocery store again.  Especially not tortilla's or pizza dough, when it's so easy and better for you to whip up at home. 


My one question to your post Kate, is the comment regarding sprouted wheat's nutritional value after milling.  From what I've read, the dry sprouted grains retain their nutritional value, but it oxidizes and declines several days after being milled.  That's why I was looking for the whole dry sprouted wheat so I can mill it myself right before use.


So what's the verdict?  How long does sprouted grain flour retain it's maximum nutritional value after being milled?


Congratulations on the weight loss, and I hope to follow suit!


-Shannon


 

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

There is a lot of information on my site regarding sprouted grains and flours. The key is to get them as fresh as possible. I make all of my sprouted grains and flours to order to ensure freshness. Keeping the flours frozen or refrigerated after you get them helps to retain the nutritients.


www.organicwheatproducts.com

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Just like coffee varies widely, so too does wheat grain. I have been experimenting with fresh ground WW and recently with sprouted flour and have found the taste differences remarkable. After some research I know that the sprouting process is tricky. If you do it yourself you need to be sure not to go to far or the grain will be ruined. Then, the now sprouted grains need to be dried at a low (under 100F) temp so as not to damage the grain and nutrients. If it isn't fully dried it will mold in storage.


I think if you have a grinder and can find a source for Organic sprouted grain it would be worth something to make a bulk purchase and grind when you need it. If you don't have a grinder I would buy the flour and freeze it until use.


What I'm discovering is that all grains are not alike. My wife, family and neighbors  have all told me they prefer grain/flour I get from one particular source. My wife says it tastes better and can pick it out every time. The transitional WW and Rye breads I made from Reinharts WGB are out of this world delicious. They have a deeper flavor and after taste with none of that (fiber for fibers sake) sawdust flavor I sometimes get. I guess it stands to reason that soil quality and preperation, and also the way the field is tended and timing of the harvest would all affect the flavors that come out when we carmalize the sugars in the oven. Anyway, I'm a convert. The wheat and rye I'm using now from Minnesota are fabulous.


Eric

katecollins's picture
katecollins

Hey Shannon,


Check out this web site for lots of info about sprouted flours - www.essentialeating.com.  These guys (maybe gals) opened the first commercial certifed organic sprouted flour mill in the US last year and this is the sprouted flour that I use.  It is amazingly fresh and consistent with excellent baking characteristics. 


Once the sprouted grain is dried properly, the nutrients do not disappear.  They package their flour in paper flour bags to prevent light from causing oxidation.  When I get it home I put in air tight packages and store in my cupboard or dark place and it is not necessary to refrigrate or freeze. 


I'm kinda doing my own test and have some 9 month old flour that has been stored this way and is still great.  And one of the reasons is that sprouted grain is in a stable state and the germ cell that is the part that causes rancidity has been eaten by the endopsperm to create the sprout.  You cannot beat the taste or the fact that it digests as a vegetable!


Kate


 

CClaire's picture
CClaire

Hey Kate,


I'm an Essential Eating sprouted flour fan too!  Their sprouted flour bakes so beautifully.  I used to have trouble digesting whole wheat bread, but have no issues with their sprouted whole wheat flour.  They have a new video on their home page at www.essentialeating.com with lots of sprouted baked goods.  Makes me hungry!