The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Kneading Baguette Dough Question

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Kneading Baguette Dough Question

I was in a dilemma as to whether to maintain the right dough temperature or pass the windowpane test. According to the recipe, by kneading the dough for 6 minutes, the dough should reach such a temperature within a given range AND it should pass the windowpane test as well.

I was doing fine with the temperature after 6 minutes but the dough did not pass the windowpane test. Should I keep kneading until it passes the test or stop so that the dough would be at the right temperature? (I stopped because my KA was acting hysterically, but now I keep wondering if I should have continued kneading.)

Thank you.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Hi Yippee. I'm sorry, I don't understand. Please explain.


--Pamela

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Pamela:

I meant all that noise and shaking and walking on the counter. I'll change my post to avoid confusion.

Yippee

xaipete's picture
xaipete

You could try doing a stretch & fold to strengthen the gluten in the dough. Since that is done by hand, there won't be any noise or hysteria.


Mark has a great video on how to do this:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/8432/latest-video-back-home


--Pamela

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Pamela.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

I was following PR's poolish baguette recipe but I also added 8 ozs of pate fermentee since he says this would give the baguette more flavor.


Could this extra piece of dough alter the outcome of kneading after 6 minutes?  Unless someone can share his/her experience with me, the only way for me to find out is to follow the poolish baguette recipe without it next time.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I haven't made that particular recipe so I don't know about how long it would take to knead. In general, every machine and perhaps every batch of dough, at least for most home bakers, is a little different. I.e., there are different variables, temperature, flour, yeast, etc. You're going to try to have to develop of feel for when the dough is kneaded enough. A lot of people like the stretch & fold method because it produces good dough structure without a lot of extended kneading. Just experiment and relax. The baguettes will probably turn out fine and next time you make them you'll have an opportunity to advance your knowledge of technique.


--Pamela

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Hi Yippee.  Don't attempt to keep on mixing your dough until you get the perfect "windowpane" or you'll wind up overmixing the dough.  


Pam's suggestion was a good one - take the dough out of the mixer and try the stretch and folds.  Getting your hands in and on the dough is the only way you'll be able to judge it's development.  It's a quite magical experience to feel the dough come to life and become light and supple under your hands.


BTW, if you are not using your KA above speed two, there's no reason for it to be shaking and trying to jump off the counter.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

At this point, my dough has completed the two rises which both allow the dough to double, both times done in the fridge because I didn't have such a long stretch of time on any particular night tending to the dough and completing the baking so I had to break up the steps.


If I take the dough out now, according to recipe, my next step would be dividing the dough to 3 pieces and shape into baguettes. 


Would it be okay to slip in the Stretch and Fold step before dividing?


Thanks a lot.


Yippee


 


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

If you do a stretch and fold now, it will deflate the dough, and you will get a very dense crumb.


David