The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sunny Millet Bread

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norabrown's picture
norabrown

Sunny Millet Bread

My husband always loved Natural Oven's Sunny Millet Bread.  Several years ago I used to make a recipe that was similar.  I cannot find it in my recipe box.


I'm confident I can come up with something similar to make him happy, but was wondering if any of you bakers out there had something similar that you would be willing to share.


 


Nora

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I used to make this bread for sandwiches when our kids were young; I made it quite a bit then, so it must have tasted fairly decent because I didn't get any complaints. I don't know if it is what you are looking for, but here it is for whatever it is worth. It is from Mary Gubser's America's Bread Book in the chapter on Alaska (Juneau).


2 packages active dry yeast


2 cups warm water


1/4 cup honey


1/2 cup sunflower seeds


1/2 cup whole hulled millet


4 cups whole wheat flour, approximately


3 tablesploons light oil


1 1/2 teaspoons salt


In a large mixing bowl combine the yeast and water, stirring until dissolved. Blend in the honey, seeds, and millet. Beat in 2 cups flour until smooth. Cover the bowl with a towel and let proof about 30 minutes, or until the mixture becomes a light, bubbly sponge.


Stir down the sponge and blend in the oil and salt. Gradually add sufficient flour to make a soft, workable dough that pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Turn the dough out on a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and resilient. Cover with a towel and let rest 30 minutes.


Butter two 8 1/2-inch loaf pans. Divide dough in half, shape into loaves, and place in the pans. Cover an let rise 1 hour.


Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Bake the loaves about 40 mintues, or until golden brown. Remove the pans and let cool and wire racks.


Makes 2 loaves.


--Pamela

norabrown's picture
norabrown

Thank you.  I'll give this one a try.  Mine had 7 grain cereal in it along with flax seed and sesame seeds. 


I'll go through my recipes again. It's got to be here.  If I don't find it...I'm make yours.  Thanks for sharing.

Katherine P's picture
Katherine P

This sounds very yummy....I don't have a stand mixer, but I do have a Zojirushi bread machine...could I use it on the dough setting and then split and bake in the oven (w/ the dry instant yeast)? I'm a complete newbie, so any help is appreciated 

xaipete's picture
xaipete

It sounds like that would work fine. --Pamela

Katherine P's picture
Katherine P

one more question...do I put all the ingredients in at the same time in the bread machine...or put the oil and salt in at the "add" beep about 1/2 way throught the first knead?

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Sorry, Katherine, I don't use a bread machine so perhaps someone else can help you out.


--Pamela

sphealey's picture
sphealey

Making dough in a bread machine on the dough or fast dough cycle, then doing the 2nd rise, shaping, proofing, and baking by hand is an excellent way to get started.  And a good way to make bread if you need something decent but don't have much available time.  When I am baking on a holiday weekend I often make the hamburger buns that way.  If you can find a copy of _Rustic European Breads from Your Bread Machine_ at the library (it is out of print) the authors describe this in some detail.


For adding the oil and salt, I would suggest starting out by using the standard bread machine sequence (liquids, then salt, then oil, then dry ingredients).  Once you have a handle on post-processing the dough you can experiment with using the bread machine for an autolyese:  let the liquids and salt mix for the first 4-5 minutes of the cycle, use pause (or just stop on a Zo), let the roughly-mixed ingredients sit for 20 minutes, restart the mix/knead cycle and add in the salt.  See if the results are worth the extra effort.


Before you know it you will be ready to try mixing and kneading by hand.


sPh

Katherine P's picture
Katherine P

I'm going to try it now! :)  Do you see any benefit to adding gluten?  All the recipes I have for the bread machine have me add gluten and lethicin. I don't know if it's b/c I use freshly milled wheat or not.  The only book I have is from the BreadBeckers, which is where i got the mill, grain, Zoji, etc...


Also, the flour is kind warm b/c it's just been milled...will this affect anything? I have typically done the dough cycle thing b/c for whatever reason, I can't get a good loaf when I bake it in the machine...falls every time.  I have reduced the 2nd rise from 30 min to 12 and still it falls...6-7 tries and I just decided to take it out, split it, let it rise and bake in the oven..I like the size of these loaves better anyway.


 


 

sphealey's picture
sphealey

=== 'm going to try it now! :)  Do you see any benefit to adding gluten?  All the recipes I have for the bread machine have me add gluten and lethicin. I don't know if it's b/c I use freshly milled wheat or not.  The only book I have is from the BreadBeckers, which is where i got the mill, grain, Zoji, etc... ===


I personally don't see the benefit of adding lethicin, especially if you are already using some sort of vegetable oil.  For pan baking I use a small amount of lethicin-oil spray but that's a very small addition. 


Whole wheat breads, 100% whole breads, and particularly breads made from 100% fresh-ground whole wheat can be tricky.  Adding some gluten is often recommended for those new to 100% whole wheat recipes as it increases the chances of success.  A lot of breadmaking is confidence and it helps to start out with recipes and techniques you know will work, then expand from there into the more technically challenging stuff. 

I am not familiar with BreadBackers but from a quick look at their site they appear to put research and thought into their work (similar to Pleasant Hill Grain, King Arthur, and a few other customer-centric companies).  I don't necessarily agree with some of what I read there myself, but breadbaking is a big world.  If they provde a recipe with the Zo then I would expect that they have tested it and think it will work, so I would give it a few trys.


That said, 100% fresh-ground whole wheat is a bit of a challenge.  You might want to search out some discussions here on TFL by people who have navigated that road, and/or try some easier recipes first than work toward 100% WW.  Eventually you may also find that you need to use sourdough to get the best results with the WW, but that is a way down the road.


HTH


sPh

Katherine P's picture
Katherine P

Thanks for your comments.  I started milling my wheat for the health benefits, and I will attest that I feel better (ex:  I have early onset otseoarthritis in my hands, and when it rains it is sometimes difficult to move w/o pain, and it has rained here for about amonth straight and I have no pain...very unusual for me...there are other digestive benefits to it that I won't get into. LOL) 


At any rate, by no means do I think I will only use freshly ground whole wheat, but that is where I've started.  (of course I would try the hardest thing first).  I will probably try mix ap flour and the freshly ground at some point, but want to make sure it is a good flour, so I will be checking out the flours you mentioned.  I do like to use the hard white a bit more than the hard red., it seems to be smoother.  I do make a mean cinnamon raisin bread w/ the freshly milled whole wheat.


KJP

Katherine P's picture
Katherine P

The dough was super wet, and I even added a 1/2 cup more flour at the start...When I took it out of the pan after the first rise, should I have added even more?  Is that possible to do?  I just split it and let it rise in my baking pans...One loaf fell, but the other seems to have risen nicely.  I tried the one that fell, and it was very good.  DH approved, so it's all good!  :) Will definately try again!

xaipete's picture
xaipete

The book that this recipe came from didn't use weight measurements. If the dough is wet, I'd just add a little more flour.


--Pamela

Katherine P's picture
Katherine P

to do that after it has risen?  I ask b/c, again, I put it in a bread machine and didn't know it was wet until the dough cycle ended.  Ideally, I would think I should add it when it was kneading, so I am asking for general information in case that is not possible (i.e. if I am unabe to watch the machine)


I'm still not confident w/ the hand kneading at this point...and do not have a stand mixer yet (am saving my pennies for an electrolux)