The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Granular lecithin

Hoyden's picture
Hoyden

Granular lecithin

This might seem fairly obvious to everyone else, but I was kind of surprised by it, so I'll share it for all the people that are as challenged as I am.


I was trying to find an alternate source for granular lecithin because I didn't want to pay shipping costs from King Arthur Flour . . .


Anyway, people use it as a nutritional supplement so you can buy it from vitamin and health food stores.  I got some at Whole Foods today.  It was cheaper than KA and it comes in a canister which is nicer is my pantry than the bag was.


I'm so pleased.

siuflower's picture
siuflower

which aisle?


 


siuflower

Hoyden's picture
Hoyden

I found it at Whole Foods in the aisle with the powdered nutritional supplements, things like whey protein etc.  The brand I got was NOW foods.  I think Amazon carries it too.

norabrown's picture
norabrown

You can use an egg or two also.

Katherine P's picture
Katherine P

Is it overkill to use lethicin AND an egg?  The recipe I have for basid dough call for 2 T of lethicin and lists an egg as optional.  I have just used both.  (but have not known why)  I use freshly ground flour if that makes a difference in the answer.


KJP

novicebaker's picture
novicebaker

What is Granular lecithin used for? I am sorry if its a dumb question:(

Hoyden's picture
Hoyden

It is used to increase the shelf life of baked goods.  If you eat your bread quickly, you probably don't need it.  I tend to bake a lot and freeze my bread, so I think it helps the flavor a bit.  As norabrown pointed out, you can put an egg yolk in your dough because they contain lecithin.  In my house eggs aren't reliably available, so I like the can of lecithin in the pantry. 


Lecithin is an emulsifier (helps oils and water to mix) and you can make a decent home-made non-stick cooking spray from liquid lecithin.


It's also supposed to be good for your brain and nerves.

novicebaker's picture
novicebaker

Hoyden, thanks a lot for explaining it, I really appreciate it. Wow, I am already learning so many stuff:)

Lansones's picture
Lansones

I thought soy lecithin (I have the granular) was used to soften breads and cookies?  

Norcalbaker's picture
Norcalbaker

emulsification the different ingredients stay together.  That in turn slows deterioration of the whole.  So while lecithin isn't an actual food preservative, it does offer some preservative like benefits.  But it's an emulsifier.  And it's used in a plethora of applications, from baked goods to ice cream, to face cream to shampoo.