The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

King Arthur, Reinhart, White Bread and Yeast

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

King Arthur, Reinhart, White Bread and Yeast

I spoke with KA today and asked re the tripling of a recipe for white bread. In this case the white bread with DMS of Reinhart on p. 266 of his Bread Bakers Apprentice. I wanted to triple the recipe and was asking re the amount of yeast. The original recipe calls for 4 3/4 cups of flour and I wanted to triple that to 14 3/4 cups. But how much yeast if they call for 2 tsps to go with the 4 3/4 cups of the recipe? The KA rep said that the rule of thumb is up to 12 cups of flour the amount of yeast is 2 tsps for bread that is going to be placed in a pan and is not artisan or free form. Could people please clarify their view on the question? Doesn't the flour need more yeast to handle the increase in flour?

Maverick's picture
Maverick

If you triple the recipe, you triple all the ingredients including yeast. This is the basis behind baker's percentages. You can make any amount of dough as long as the proportions stay the same.

shimpiphany's picture
shimpiphany

just tripling the amouts does not always work.  you want the proportions of the ingredients to stay the same - and that doesn't always happen when you are using imperial measurements.  that's why weights need to be used with the percentage.

suave's picture
suave

Since he mentioned bakers % it is safe to assume he meant weights.

Maverick's picture
Maverick

Yes, I did mean by weight. But shimpiphany makes a good point to clarify this fact. If measuring by volume (as seems to be the conversion used in the original post), tripling the volume can compound any errors in measurement that may result.

Boogenstein's picture
Boogenstein

tripling imperial measurements will always keep the proportions the same unless your mathematical abilities fail you. For instance:" 4 3/4 x 3 = 14 1/4 rather than 14 3/4 as stated above. If working with fractions proves tricky, convert to metric.

shimpiphany's picture
shimpiphany

i believe reinhardt has the baker's percentages in the book, so use that, or use the weights to calculate the % of yeast to flour, then use that to calculate the amount of yeast for your tripled recipe.  i've set up a basic spreadsheet that allows me to just plug in these numbers, might be a good idea to do the same as it will work for all your recipes.

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Does anyone care to comment on the KA perspective of the


the rule of thumb is up to 12 cups of flour the amount of yeast is 2 tsps for bread that is going to be placed in a pan and is not artisan or free form.


 

suave's picture
suave

Perhaps they meant 2 tsp/bread? Of course in this case it would be easier to say 1 tsp of yeast for every 2 cups of flour.  Or perhaps they did not include S&H?

LindyD's picture
LindyD

The BBA lists the baker's percentage on all recipes so you can calculate the amounts  yourself, CB.


Wild-Yeast has instructions at her blog.


So does King Arthur Flour here


If you run into any hurdles, am sure there's plenty of people here who could help.

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

I remain curious...


Does anyone care to comment on the KA perspective that the rule of thumb is up to 12 cups of flour the amount of yeast is 2 tsps for bread that is going to be placed in a pan and is not artisan or free form.


I have seen this suggested elsewhere, and KA do have considerable experience and expertise.

Maverick's picture
Maverick

I believe KA's theory is that by the time you shape or bake your final loaf it may be overproofed if too much yeast is used. I suppose the reason behind the loaf pan distinction may be that you have a more confined space and it can bubble over. However, I find it strange that they would make the distinction.

Yeast is one of those components that is completely adjustable to help things fit your schedule. Less yeast means longer rise time, and more yeast means shorter rise time. This also affects flavor. However, with an enriched bread, longer rise times are generally not really needed for flavor.

If you want the timing to be the same as the recipe, then scale the yeast accordingly. If you want to leave yourself more time just in case, use less yeast.

Maverick's picture
Maverick

While KA shows that scaling all ingredients following bakers percentage as linked by LindyD is fine, I found this in a document on their site that may explain it better than I did above:

Up-sizing

Unlike many baking recipes, you can increase the size of most bread recipes simply by doubling, tripling, etc. all of the ingredients. The exception is the yeast; if you increase the amount of yeast at the same rate you increase everything else, you may find yourself with a lot of dough on your hands and not enough time to deal with it. For example, by the time you’ve shaped the eighth loaf, the first may be well on its way to doubled in size; eventually you’ll start feeling like the Sorcerer’s Apprentice!

Most home bread bakers prefer to stick with 1 tablespoon of yeast, for up to eight loaves, and just giving the bread a longer, slower rise. Not only does this improve the flavor, it slows down the rising dough so that you can work with it more effectively.

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Thanks Maverick


cb


 

Maverick's picture
Maverick

No problem. Here is a link to the entire article on yeast. It has some good information:
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes2008/yeast.html