The Fresh Loaf

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The Bread Lover's Bread Machine Cookbook Typo?

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ClemsonScout's picture
ClemsonScout

The Bread Lover's Bread Machine Cookbook Typo?

I just received The Bread Lover's Bread Machine Cookbook as a gift.  I was looking through it and one of the 100% whole wheat recipes 1.5lb called for 1 tablespoon of SAF yeast.  That seems like a way overkill.  Is this a typo?


 


I'm new to bread making and have had quite a few failures with a new batch of Fleischmann's yeast, first jar no problems.  I decided to try SAF yeast and from what I've read seems to be really consistant.  The failures I've seen is collapsed french breads and my wheat breads not rising enough, basically bricks.  I have a Panasonic SD-YD250.  Everything is pointing at the yeast.  Am I missing anything else?

ClemsonScout's picture
ClemsonScout

I sometimes use the same measuring spoon for the salt and yeast, can this be causing the issue?

niagaragirl's picture
niagaragirl

If you are continually using the salt spoon to dip into the jar, my guess is that some rogue crystals could be causing oxidation of the coating of the yeast granules. Salt is a pretty powerful component. I recently played around with some simple salt experiments on my blog. Here's the link. Use a clean spoon.

LLM777's picture
LLM777

I looked up a few of my bread machine recipes and there are a couple of whole wheat ones that have 1 tbsp. of yeast. I, personally, would start with 2 1/4 tsp. anyway but that is up to you. 


Most of the time I have to cut back on the amount of yeast for my machine so you may need to do the same. I, too, use SAF and I like it.


I don't think the same measuring spoon would cause the fall. Try one recipe over and over until you get it right. Start with the amount of yeast, then fine tune it by working with the amount of liquid.


It just sounds like you need to tweak the recipes a bit for your machine. We all have too. :)

suave's picture
suave

For the whole wheat recipe in a bread machine it looks about right.  Your yeast is likely a toast though.

syllymom's picture
syllymom

Just wondering when you add the yeast as your last ingredient are you puting it on top of the salt?  Hopefully not.  Usually the order of ingredients for breadmachines is that the flour goes on top of all other ingredients with the yeast on top of the flour.


When bread collapes it's usually a case that the yeast ate up all the food before being baked.  So cutting back on the yeast would help.  Keep in mind that all purpose flour behaves different than whole wheat flour so with whole wheat you may need more yeast.


With bread machines is all about manipulating the ingredients to work with the timing of the machine. 

ClemsonScout's picture
ClemsonScout

The Panisonic machine I have has a separate compartment for the yeast.  It drops it in about 10 or so minutes after it starts mixing.  I'm going to try the SAF yeast I ordred off of eBay and no mixing of measuring spoons.. Hopefully that will solve it.


So what variables effect the rising/collapsing issues?  Yeast, water, temperature, anything else?  I'm referring to the standard problems.

LLM777's picture
LLM777

Yes, amounts of yeast and liquid plus temperature are extremely important to bread machine recipes but also the amount of sugar or honey will definitely affect outcome. In my experience, those factors have been about it.


Following the recipe exactly at first will give you an idea of how the recipe responds to your machine. Then look at the beginning of your bread machine cookbook and it should have a troubleshooting guide to help figure out the problem whether it is too much liquid (collapsed loaf), not enough liquid (dry, rough top of loaf), and many, many more causes and solutions that I can't write here. Just change one thing at a time and then you will know what effect it has on the bread. More than anything --write what you do each time.  Any process you use to make bread needs a journal/notes in the book for successful repeats. 


And just in case, make sure you keep your yeast in an airtight container in the frig or freezer then take what you need out 15-30 minutes before you use it.  That will help preserve your supply for a long while.