The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Could you recommend a dependable rye loaf recipe for me? *PICS ADDED

photojess's picture
photojess

Could you recommend a dependable rye loaf recipe for me? *PICS ADDED

I feel like this site is seriously overwhelming......and I feel like some of what I read is way over my head.


I love reading through all of the posts seeing what people do and how they change a recipe up, but I'm no where ready to start changing recipes yet!  Is there a rye recipe I can make in one day (tomorrow), that is dependable and either posted on here or on a blog somewhere?  I'd love to make my own rye bread, and I have light rye flour and the caraway seeds ready to go.


Would love to see your recommendations!


BTW, off topic, but is there any way of saving threads to a favorites folder on here, under our logins?


 


Thanks a bunch!

SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

I can't speak to the one-day rye. I'm not yet making bread with any real reliability as of yet. But all your threads are automatically saved. You can see them by going to "My Account" on the left sidebar. Once your account info is pulled up, just click on the "Track" tab at the upper portion of your screen and it will give you a list of all threads you have participated in (though I'm not sure, just yet, how long it saves such information).

niagaragirl's picture
niagaragirl

Check my blog - it is geared for new bakers who are overwhelmed


link


The rye recipe uses stone ground rye. But it will work well with 3 oz light rye and 8 oz all purpose. Just keep the total flour weight the same and you'll be fine.


 

photojess's picture
photojess

I think I'll be making that today......I'm in central NY...not too far away from you.

sphealey's picture
sphealey

The "Real Jewish Rye" from Rose Levy Beranbaum's _The Bread Bible_ is easy to make if you follow Rose's ultra-precise directions and has at least a 95% success rate for me.


It doesn't have a very high percentage of rye flour, but after you make it a few times you can gradually increase the rye.  A good recipe to practice with.


sPh

photojess's picture
photojess

but I don't have any of the bread books yet, which is why I was asking if there was something posted on here or a blog I could go to.


I started Niagaragirl's rye, and it's rising in the oven now.....we'll see how it turns out!


thanks again....I need to invest in some books I think!

photojess's picture
photojess

First, I want to thank Niagaragirl so much for showing me her site and her recipe!  This couldn't be an easier recipe to dish out a few batches in a few hours....and the taste is wonderful.....I was so happy when I saw the rise and how well they sprang in the oven.


I used my Pampered Chef stone, preheated it in the oven, and used a scalpel to do the scoring.....


Thought I would share these two pics with you.


OT: Does anyone know anything about the Lancaster Flour Co?  I use this box as a prop for children's photos, and bought it at an antique store, for the color of it.



SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

that was the picture from a book cover until I read the post that went with it! WOW.

photojess's picture
photojess

That is a really nice compliment....I would love to get into more food styling for my own pics.....I don't have a big collection of towels and such though, but it is an interest I have.


This just worked out really well!

amarshall's picture
amarshall

Lancaster, PA, was the home of Lancaster Milling Company, which on April 1, 1901 was incorporated into Eastern Milling Company in a combine involving many millers in the east. Eastern Milling was subsequently absorded in another combine, creating East Coast Milling on January 1902.


Later, another (?) Lancaster Milling company started up in 1911, but their brand was Daisy Flour. Pictures and Narrative


http://millpictures.com/Mills/details.cfm?millid=753


One other onteresting thing about Lancaster, PA is that it was the home of James Buchanan, whose estate in Lancaster was called Wheatland. 


The millpictures site referenced above has many, many pictures of mills in Lancaster County, so it would appear to have been quite the milling centre at one time.  The owner of the millpictures website is a Pennsylvanian, so may you can contact him to find out more.


Good Luck!

niagaragirl's picture
niagaragirl

I am so glad you had success. When I develop things for beginners, I do a few non standard things to help ensure success. Like pulling back a little salt, adding a little more sugar, adding a shortening, etc. Trust me when I started back into baking I was an utter moron when it came to bread. Now it's the most natural thing in the world for me. You have to fail a few times, but from failure comes understanding.


Jess, could you email me at buffalobaker at domain of gmail dot com? I'd love to use your success story on my blog with links back to any sites you want. Thx - Libby

photojess's picture
photojess

I sent you an email.


for others, the darker loaves, were 400 deg for 30 min, the middle colored loaves were 28 min at 400, and the light loaves were 375 deg for 28 min.  I also did add about 1/4 more AP flour, I forgot to mention that.


When I said I had light rye flour, the bag actually said course pumpernickle rye, so I did the 3 oz as you suggested, but it was too wet without adding a tad more flour.  then it was perfect to work with.

Yumarama's picture
Yumarama

Beautiful photography. Can you give some details on how it was set up? Daylight diffused (shadows are very soft) or lamp? Two light sources or reflector or is that a second, northern window on the right?


 

photojess's picture
photojess

I was quite pleased with how this turned out!  East facing sliding glass door on the camera left, and a white foam core board on camera right, just to give some bounced light on the loaves.  The first attempt, which included reflecting back on the box, left too much of a highlight, which didn't look natural, so I moved the foam core forward.


I do think this has a slight green cast to it, so if I were using this pic for anything else, I'd take the color cast out.


thanks for the compliments!  And Sula too.

amarshall's picture
amarshall

Delicious looking loaves, Jess.


I'm wondering if Libby or anyone else would suggest a modification to her recipe using a sourdough starter instead of packaged yeast.  The last (and first) time I tried rye, it was quite dense.  I thought is was a typically firm rye, but the family thought it didn't rise enough.

niagaragirl's picture
niagaragirl

There are numerous sourdough ryes on the web and there are probably some right on this forum. I have not started blogging about SDs yet, there's too much workon my blog to do in other areas first. I strive for original content with my own trials rather than recipes recycled from other sources.

amarshall's picture
amarshall

I think I will go ahead with only minor modifications to niagaragirl's recipe. I will cut back the liquid slightly, since my starter is 100% hydration.  My family is not big on butter, so I'll substitute cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil.  In the morning I will decide about the choice between sugar and honey

amarshall's picture
amarshall

I also found this advice on the KAF website:


Generally you can substitute a cup of starter for 1 cup of flour and 1/2 cup of water in a recipe.


 

amarshall's picture
amarshall

I'm fairly new to bread baking in general, but I've started with, and only used, sourdough.  So I'm experimenting here.


My starter is about 50% rye (Rogers Dark Rye) and the balance probably half-and-half all purpose and Rogers Whole Wheat.  I left it at 85F overnight in the oven and this morning it had roughly tripled.  I cut and ounce each of water and milk from Libby's recipe to compensate for the hydration of the sponge.  I used her amounts of flour, salt and sugar and mixed the dry ingredients first, since I wanted teh salt well mixed in before introducing the starter.  The water, milk and oil (substituting for butter) were added and the dry and liquid well-mixed before I stirred in a cup of starter.  Somehow, I forgot the vinegar.  (See below)  While kneeding - in a KitchenAid, I know, I'm lazy - I worked in some extra flour.  The result was still a rather sticky dough, but I've got it now in a lightly greesed bowl n 85F proofing oven, so I'll see how it turns out.


About the vinegar:  Rogers, a miller of flours up here in the Great White North, suggests in all their recipes a similar about of lemon juice, saying that it is a great natural dough conditioner.  I guess vinegar and lemon juice would have similar effects.  Would the natural acidity of the sourdough starter make the acid addition unnecessary?


Question on flours:  On Libby/niagaragirl's blog, she writes "A characteristic of rye flours in general is a lowered ability to form gluten."  Next time, should I compensate with a high-gluten flour instead of all-purpose?


Once risen, I'm thinking that I might split the dough into a medium sized loaf and do the rest as dinner rolls.

niagaragirl's picture
niagaragirl


Question on flours: On Libby/niagaragirl's blog, she writes "A characteristic of rye flours in general is a lowered ability to form gluten." Next time, should I compensate with a high-gluten flour instead of all-purpose?



You could, yes. The reason I wrote that is that a lot of beginners think "more rye, more rye taste, better rye bread". Not true. A high percentage of rye, like 50% and and above, would result in a very unsatisfactory dough. If using stone ground rye, it would in fact be almost rock hard.


It's not that rye does not develop gluten, it's that the structure is short and a little harder to develop.


See this post on my fun food blog which casually addresses the challenge of too much stone ground rye flour. Link


 

LindyD's picture
LindyD


A high percentage of rye, like 50% and and above, would result in a very unsatisfactory dough. If using stone ground rye, it would in fact be almost rock hard.



That's totally incorrect.  Some of the best rye breads contain 60 percent or more rye.  A stoneground rye can produce a lovely crumb which is certainly not "rock hard."


Combining a high percentage of rye with a rye sourdough and high gluten flour can produce a beautiful and very tasty bread. 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Niagaragirl:


You might want to read the Rye section of the TFL handbook.


If you are gettting the results you describe with rye flour, we can help you. Please present your problem with rye as a problem to be solved rather than as an inevitable consequence of using a high percentage of rye flour.


David

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

above and that is one dry ugly loaf of rye bread!  Yikes!


I can't help but disagree with your above opinion of rye.   I think it is fair to say that rye behaves differently and may require special handling but to predict that all high percent rye loaves made with stone ground flour "would in fact be almost rock hard" is just too closed minded. 


I'm all for "more rye, more rye taste, and better rye bread."  It's natural to agree, rye tastes great!


Mini

niagaragirl's picture
niagaragirl

Please note that my opinions on rye were with regards to the referenced posts, and were not meant as a general treatise on rye. So relax a little.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

You were simply called out for giving out misinformation about rye - a flour you admittedly have little experience with, or knowledge of.


I hope you heed the advice given and read the TFL Handbook.  It was written by very experienced TFL bakers.

SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

At the risk of sounding ignorant - what's so ugly about that loaf? The crumb looks like what I've most often seen for a high percentage rye bread. I'm new, so please by all means enlighten me!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven


Would the natural acidity of the sourdough starter make the acid addition unnecessary?



Yes. 



Next time, should I compensate with a high-gluten flour instead of all-purpose?



You could, many recipes ask for bread flour or high-gluten flour especially when WW is in the recipe.


Mini

amarshall's picture
amarshall

We ended up having to go out.  I was hoping the rising, shaped, loaf would still be alright when we got back, but it had collapsed.  I basked it anyway; the flavour is great.  I think I'll get some high gluten flour for today's attempt.

photojess's picture
photojess

try this recipe as is!  It was pretty fool proof for me~

photojess's picture
photojess

be rest assured that these are not dense, and rose really well.  They are about softball sized rolls, so they are not huge, and the recipe makes two.  They are a nice size and toast really well too.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, photojess.


If you want to make a classic Jewish Sour Rye, Greenstein's formula in "Secrets of a Jewish Baker" is a winner. Greenstein has been criticized for giving volume measurements rather than weights for his ingredients. Most all of us find weighing ingredients yields more precise and reproducible results.


I have "translated" Greenstein's formula into weights, and recommend this bread, if it's the type of rye you want to bake. You can find my translation here.


If you want to make heavier, German-type ryes, Leader's "Local Breads" and Hamelman's "Bread" are good sources.


Keep us posted on your progress! You are off to a great start.


David

photojess's picture
photojess

I'm off to save that and take a look at the recipe. I just looked at how long I have been a member here, and it's 3 weeks and a few days.....


I've learned so much already!


 


thanks