The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Update - First Ever Sourdough and It Failed - Update

Jenady's picture
Jenady

Update - First Ever Sourdough and It Failed - Update

Well, I almost sent my starter down the drain. After reading all the responses to my original post I decided to get it out of the refrigerator and work with it. I fed it twice a day for several days. Its whole character changed. I began to have what others were describing.


Early in the morning a couple of days ago I went back to the original recipe and began a double batch. Every step went better. My starter was very active. I did all my proofing at room temperature, 68 degrees. Finally at 9:30 PM the baking was started. The oven was at 500 degrees with steam for 10 minutes. Then I dropped the temperature to 450 degrees for another 20 minutes. The oven spring was considerable.


This time the bread came out better. The crust is chewy, the crumb is moist and tender, and the taste is great!


Thanks to everyone.


Original subject: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/11254/first-ever-sourdough-and-it-failed


 




Soundman's picture
Soundman

Hi Jenady,


Nice looking loaves you got there. It's so much more fun when it turns into bread, isn't it?


David

jemar's picture
jemar

It looks fantastic! So far I haven't plucked up the courage to do a sourdough, but when i do I hope it looks as good as yours.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

It takes time--perhaps months or even a year, I think--to really get a great SD starter. Mine about 2 months old now and I'm noticing that they are still changing. And this just has to do with the starter. Baking SD loaves has a learning curve of its own too! Working with any given recipe means understanding how rough or gently to handle it, how to recognize when it is proofed just enough, figuring out how to bake it so as to achieve the right crust and crumb, etc.


I can't say every loaf I make is better than my previous one, but, in general, they are improving as begin to recognize when they are ready to bake, how to get more oven spring, etc.


I think SD loaves require a lot of skill and art--experience--that, well, takes time to perfect.


Your loaves look great! I think of baking SD breads as an adventure that never is exactly the same.


--Pamela

rolls's picture
rolls

lovely loaves! i began a starter about 5 days ago im feeding it every 12 hours until it can double itself i always find a few  bubbles i guess i have to be patient i just can't wait though to start making bread with it and adding it to other recipes. i followed the directions on susan's wildyeatblog.com for the starter. i used organic rye flour + white flour. i just use regular tap water i hope im doing the right thing. its a waiting game  i think.