The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hamelman's Pain Rustique

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Hamelman's Pain Rustique

Not sure this is the right place to post about a recipe tried, but if it's not I will delete it and post it somewhere else.


 


Today I made Hamelman's Pain Rustique (page 111 of "Bread" )   - I made half the recipe, ending with two small loaves, will be perfect for lunch/dinner today.


 


The recipe is extremely easy - dough is a pleasure to work with. An overnight poolish goes in the final dough, that rises for only 70 minutes with two folds at 25 and 50 min.  Final rise is less than half an hour - bread is not shaped, just separated in rectangles of the right size, and slashed.


 


I will post two photos. We loved the flavor and crumb texture, by the way

rainwater's picture
rainwater

those loaves look so good that I will purchase the book very soon......it seems everytime someone posts a recipe from Hamelman's "Bread" they are beautiful.......can't wait to get the book.  Thanks for sharing.

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

I am not an expert and feel bad even giving my opinion here, but I feel that anyone who enoys baking bread absolutely HAS to have that book.


I tried only one recipe that did not work very well, but I'm sure it was not Hamelman's fault. At that time I was not baking bread regularly, so I didn't know what I was doing. For the most part, I still don't - but my breads are getting better


:-)


I enjoy his descriptions of the bread - he gives a very good idea of what each bread will be like. 


 

jemar's picture
jemar

Your loaves look really lovely and I'm sure they must taste as good as they look!

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Thank you!


 


I absolutely love the moment of removing the cover and looking at the bread still in the oven... those 30 or so minutes waiting for the outcome are a bit hard to take sometimes  :-)

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

How was the crumb?


David

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Uneven holes, not too big - not as big as the Vermont sourdough, for instance. But uneven. The crumb had a more "creamy" feel than a sourdough.


 


I thought about taking a picture of the crumb but the slices started to disappear too quickly - I might take one at dinner time. Also, I was not sure about the "ethics" of crowding this site with too many photos in a post.


Is it ok to post several photos in the same thread?


 


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Sally.


I dare say most TFL members would rather see too many photos than too few. You can also format smaller photos, if you want.


I can just picture you cutting a slice to photograph, only to have it grabbed before you can switch from knife to camera. Over, and over again until the loaf is gone.


At least you didn't report any inadvertent amputations!


David

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Formatting smaller photos might be a good idea.  I am not very talented as far as photo editing goes, but I'll try.


 


I managed to take a pitcure of the crumb, will try to post once I figure how to make them smaller


 


 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

You probably got some kind of photo editing software with your camera. If you open the image and change the size to 4X6 inches it will be much better for uploading. You can message me if you have questions about how to do it.


Eric

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Sometimes I just go to a free site called http://www.shrinkphotos.com  for a quickie photo shrink!  Does it all for you!


Sylvia

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Ok trying to post a smaller version.


 


The crumb

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Perfect!

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Great looking...love photos...the more the better!  A picture says a ........


Sylvia

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Very nice looking loaves!  They look like they would be very tasty! 


Sylvia

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Those are a thig of beauty!


Eric

rolls's picture
rolls

wow can i ask how long have you been baking? that looks amazing what did you use to score? did you say you covered the loaves while baking? thanks

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

My starter turned 1 year old this month.  I have been baking more seriously (well, seriously is not a good word, maybe "regularly") for about 6 months.


I used a baker's blade to score them - I realize that I had been cutting the scores too deep - now I do a very small cut and it works better.


I cover the loaves for 30 minutes using the bottom part of a cheap roasting pan, then uncover for the final 15 minutes, or until the bread is done.

gosiam's picture
gosiam

Sally, the loaves are superb.  Thank you for posting the pics.  Agree, the more pics, the better.


Gosia

rolls's picture
rolls

thanks ive never heard of a baker's blade before. i started a starter two days ago it already seems active. really love your loaves do  you have any other pics of breads you've made?

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Thank you!


 


as far as other pictures, I have way way way too many.


 


they are all in my flickr site -


http://www.flickr.com/photos/79167445@N00/sets/


 


some of my favorite sets are Pita bread, Roasted Garlic Bread (that was one of the best breads ever, I don't think the picture does it justice)


All sets that refer to bread baking have pretty obvious titles, feel free to browse through - you will see that not all projects have a very happy ending, but even the not so great breads tasted good enough to eat  :-)


Good luck on your starter - in the beginning it seems tricky to keep it going, but in a couple of weeks you won't even think too much about it, it will all becomes second nature

slimk23's picture
slimk23

I learned to bake bread from my grandmothers years ago, but am now baking again using SD starter I made a month ago.  Please explain baking in a covered roaster???  Are you referring to a metal roaster??  Here are some pictures of my 1st breads made with my starter.  Love this site!!!

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I'm using an oval turkey roaster to cover my SD bread during the first 12 minutes of baking. It is an alternative method to using a steam pan. I get a lot better oven spring using the turkey roaster than with steam.


I don't preheat the roaster, just fill it with hot water, load the loaf into the oven on the stone, cover the oven window, dump the water out without drying the pan, and cover the loaf with the roaster (David advised me how to do this).


--Pamela

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

That is a very good idea!


I am always burning myself with the roaster - I developed these wonderful little scars on the top of my knucles since I started to bake bread more regularly


 


I will try your method with my next loaf!

slimk23's picture
slimk23

Here is my other breads.

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Very nice!


 


I will post a picture for you of my roaster assembly in the oven - I think I got this idea from a website called "Discovering Sourdough" - but to be completely honest, I read so much stuff in so many places that I cannot be sure exactly where I got this from. At any rate, it made a huge difference in the quality of my breads


 


It is the bottom part of a cheap roaster, the kind people use when camping - hope you can see it well, the picture is a little dark in my computer

slimk23's picture
slimk23

Thank you...the picture really helped!!

rolls's picture
rolls

yes i can see where you'd get those knuckle  burns lol!