The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

photography and cameras

  • Pin It
ques2008's picture
ques2008

photography and cameras

I"m itching to "show off" my creations (I'm a newbie at bread baking) and was wondering what kind of digital camera I should purchase to be able to post on TFL.  Also, here's another question.  Can a camcorder be used also as a camera?  The reason I ask is I'd like to be able to create videos as well one day in the future.  Are some camcorders designed for easy upload to YouTube?


Thanks for any advice!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I am extremely thrifty and couldn't pass up this deal I found on hot deals club:

Dell.com - Kodak M763 Digital Camera for $52.50
Kodak Easyshare M763 Digital Camera in Blue for $65 with free shipping. Coupon code 46PS59J6STVMLC gives $15 off and code T7DJTNQ21PS33B gives $2.50 off, making it $47.50, plus $5 shipping. They are likely clearing out this discontinued model, but still a great deal since most other stores sell it for $87 to $120, and it has decent reviews.

My camera just got here and it seems very nice.  Certainly not the latest or the fanciest, but for 50 bucks I can't complain, and quite adequate for posting here.

ques2008's picture
ques2008

Thanks, Floydm for the heads-up.  Will have to check it out.  Not sure though if they would ship to Canada, or if that hot deal is applicable to non-US residents.


Will ask.


Thanks again.

bassopotamus's picture
bassopotamus

I used to work in a camera shop and many people had that same video/still question. The bottom line is that at least as of what we were selling a year ago, nothing did both particularly well. Most video cameras did stills, but the resolution was much lower (though probably adequate for the web). They were also, In my opinion, kind of clunky for using for stills. Still cameras, OTOH, almost all have video modes now, unless you are looking at SLRs, where only a couple do. On these, the video images weren't bad, but the sound was usually awful. I'm not sure about the youtube issue. Casio was selling camreas with a "you tube video mode" but I think it was more a marketing thing than anything real

ques2008's picture
ques2008

Thank you bassopotamus for your advice.  What does OTOH mean?  Sorry, I'm a newbie at almost everything - bread and photography!  And what does SLR mean?


Thanks!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

OTOH - On the other hand


SLR - single-lens reflex.  See wikipedia for more info.


You might be better off starting at someplace like CNet (check out their digital camera buyer's guide) and getting a better idea of the right kind of digital camera for you before walking into a store.  I agree with suave that if you walk into an electronics store and say "someone on the internet told me I should look for an SLR with good optics" you're going to be marked as a sucker right off the bat.


A nice SLR with good optics is far superior to what I recommended, but then again the camera I got for 60 bucks is superior to what people were paying $1000 for three years ago, and it is plenty good for posting 400x600 72 dpi images on the internet.

ques2008's picture
ques2008

OK, Floydm, good idea.  CNet Reviews are reliable.  I will start reading!  I guess my ignorance came out loud and clear!


Thanks again.

leemid's picture
leemid

Several years ago I purchased a digital camera for the family. One criterion was that it had to be easy to use; another that it had to take GOOD pictures. I studied up on it and concluded that the Panasonic had the best optics among 'cheap' cameras. I personally wanted an SLR because they typically come with better optics. Why do I keep mentioning optics? Because that is what takes a good in-focus picture. If you have a steady hand, or mount the camera on a tripod, the best picture the camera can take is based upon the quality of the lens not the resolution of the camera. A 10 megapixel camera with so-so optics will take a less clear picture than a 5 meg camera with superb optics. The problem is that good optics cost money. To justify good optics, manufacturers only offer the good stuff on more expensive cameras.


If you are shooting pictures of the ocean, or your family, a cheapie will do nicely. But if you want stunning pictures of bread crumb, my opinion is that you need to get one of the cheaper SLRs that have good optics.


All of that said, I post pictures here occasionally, taken with my Panasonic, without too much embarrassment...


Lee

ques2008's picture
ques2008

thank you leemid for your comments.  Will bear that in mind.  I'll look into the panasonic line.  So if I tell the store clerk that I need good optics, he'll know what I'm referring to?

suave's picture
suave

I'm afraid what he'll know is that he has you over a barrel.


Mike.

ques2008's picture
ques2008

I guess so!  Thanks for opening my eyes!

ehanner's picture
ehanner

The problem with discussing which camera is better than another is that if you don't establish the intended use, budget range and ability, you really are not all talking about the same thing. For example, one persons idea of "easy to use" might be anthers "hard to use". One persons idea of value may be coming from a totally different income level. Would you purchase a stand mixer just because it was a "cheapo" and worked on cookie dough  when you bought it?


I contend that you should give some thought to your budget first. Then as suggested above, find a camera with good glass optics in your budget that will do what you want. Here is an example of a camera that would suit the needs of almost everyone not intending on printing on paper, larger than 5x7 inches. This camera will sell on ebay for a very low price since it is no longer in favor with the large Mp crowd, but will easily take family pictures, beaches and food as well as any of the modern cameras. Take a look at ebay and scan for digital cameras then sort from cheapest descending. Any working camera with a lens the size of a half dollar that has a macro mode in the 3-5 mp range will be fine, if you are budget conscious. If you don't mind spending $100 or $300 or $1500 there are options in all of those price brackets. If you shop for technology that has passed in favor for a few years there are great deals to be found.If all you intend to do is upload and or email images and not print them large, save your money and find an older quality camera.


The same is true with computer hardware. Your kids might want/need a high performance fast processor and a zillion htz of bus speed with the latest graphics card, but, you don't need anything more modern than say 1999-2000 to run a web browser and MS Office. And that is all most users run.

ques2008's picture
ques2008

good points ehanner.  I'll check out that camera.


Many thanks, much appreciated.

JIP's picture
JIP

Alot of good points have already been made but I will add a few.  I think the most important thing to consider when purchasing a digital camera is budget.  I worked many years selling cameras and this was the first thing I would always discuss with someone as you can't discuss cameras till you know what you want to spend. 


What you want to use it for is probably the next most important thing.  If you just want to shoot some images to post on the web and/or this forum you do not need an expensive camera.  If you want to use it for prints you might look into something a little more expensive even up to a DSLR.


As far as video goes if you want video buy a video camera if you want stills buy a still camera.  That being said posting a video from your digital still camera is generally easier than from a camcorder but of course the quality is lower.  The other thing you have to contend with is some digital still cameras video settings limit you to around 30 seconds worth of video.


Sorry for the diatribe I hope this helps some.


 

ques2008's picture
ques2008

Thanks JIP for adding your comments.  Well, I finally got around to buying an inexpensive camera - one of the cameras that was posted by floydm:  kodak easy share.  99 canadian dollars.  in fact bought it at the supermarket which has an electronics section, as i didn't want to go to a camera shop and be bombarded with recommendations from the sales people.  for now, it will do.  i'm a complete novice and if i choose to get more sophisticated later on, i might graduate.


as for the video, i'm eyeing the canon flash100 or something like that for my summer vacation.

michalraise's picture
michalraise

It's good corner...I'll check and read out that camera...


 


--------------------
voucher codes