The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pierre Nury's Rustic Light Rye

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gosiam's picture
gosiam

Pierre Nury's Rustic Light Rye

is my new favourite sourdough bread.  I have just baked it for the third time and though I think that my second attempt was better than this one (airy and delighfully sour), today's loaf still performed O.K. at lunch time.


 



It takes me three days to make this bread from creating the stiff starter,through retardation, and baking.  At the end, I feel, I end up with too little bread (two small loaves at 518g) for the amount of work and time devoted.  Therefore, I am intending to double the weights and form 3 x 690g loaves.  Do I have to change any of the timeline - the bulk retardation, proofing, baking.  Would someone help me with these questions, please?


Thank You.


Gosia

Davo's picture
Davo

Same times, I reckon. Just be careful though if your amounts expect you to recover a certain amount of starter from your levain. If you say double everything, but don't double your recovery amount, you may end up with a higher ratio of levain to bread dough, which will then ferment a bit faster than planned, and may lead to overproving if all the times are kept the same...


I usually make 4 loaves at about 900 or so grams, mine are usually 20% wholemeal rye and 80% bakers flour. I find they freeze really well and if left a few hours to defrost are pretty much identical to a loaf that's been baked and left a day or two before eating (which is how I like it best - better than the day of baking when it's too "fluffy" - so you could think about that (bake even more and freeze some).

MommaT's picture
MommaT

Wow, despite the small quantities, your bread looks marvelous.  


Not to mention the photo-styling and the SOUP!


Mmmmmm....


Should have eaten lunch!


MommaT

Soundman's picture
Soundman

Hi Gosia,


First of all, that's very beautiful bread, artfully photographed. Maybe you took a tip from Eric Hanner?


To your question: the beauty of baker's percentage is it's scalable (no, not that way! ;-)). You should be able to double, triple, halve, or whatever and the recipe should otherwise stay the same. Timings won't need to change unless temperature changes.


I do find one problem with just increasing everything: my KitchenAid can't deal with all that much dough at one time! This may not matter to you, if you hand knead or have a large mixer. In the end, this limitation turned into a virtue, as lots of dough means less machine mixing and more slap-and-fold for me.


Show us your next loaves?


David

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Nice bread, soup, and photo! --Pamela

glora's picture
glora

Can any tell me what is the best thermometer for a wood burning oven?  One that is built in or a traditional oven thermometer?


Gena Lora


 

gosiam's picture
gosiam

David (soundman), thank you for the reminder - certainly, I need to use the baker's math to work out the formula for the larger amount of this bread.  Though I have been reading on it and understood the concept, when it came to revamping the recipe, it did not stay with me.  Thank you for bringing this to my attention.


Indeed, I took hints from Eric concerning picture quality.  His suggestion to shoot at ISO 600-800 made all the difference, so Eric, all the credit goes to you for this briliant idea.


Many thanks to Everybody who commented so positively on this post.


Gosia

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

I have an online spreadsheet set up to do Pierre Nury's Rustic Light Rye.  The spreadsheet can be found here.  When that page opens select the tab at the bottom of the sheet that says "Light Rye".  The only thing you will need to do is change the grams of the "Desired amount of Dough" to what you want and the rest of the spreadsheet will calculate the amounts for you.

gosiam's picture
gosiam

Hello LeadDog, love the tool, thanks for turning me to it.  I've seen it before, but was not sure which breads the formulas were representing.  Now it's all clear.


One question though, I cannot see olive oil in Daniel Leader's original.  Do you add it to your own version?  If so, why and how do you find it?


Thanks.


Gosia

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

I forgot about the olive oil.  Anything in blue in the spreadsheet you can edit.  Just change the olive oil to zero and then it will be Pierre Nury's Rustic Light Rye.  I make a loaf bread using that formula in a cast iron roasting pan and use the olive oil in that formula.  The spreadsheet is set for me to play what if to different formulas.  Anyone can use the spreadsheet to do the same just change the blue cells and the spreadsheet will update based on those changes.  The other nice feature that I like about the spreadsheet is once you find a formula you like or want to try out, you can enter it into the spreadsheet and change the "Desired amount of Dough".  Now you have a formula that works for the volume of dough that you want to make.  I found many formulas that I wanted to try were just a little bit to small for the equipment that I'm using.  This makes it easy to scale them up to were I want them.

The olive oil make the crumb nice and soft and tender.  If I was making Pierre Nury's Rustic Light then I would leave it out.  That formula is wonderful just the way it is.

By the way the spreadsheet is set up for the way my brains thinks about how to look at bread formulas.  There are other spreadsheets that other people have made that look at formulas differently so if mine isn't to your liking keep looking around.  Also any good ideas can be added to the spreadsheets.  Maybe I should have the first sheet be the directions on how to use the sheets.

Soundman's picture
Soundman

Hi LeadDog,


I think your grid should be added to the existing spreadsheets in the Tools tab. Maybe an email to Floyd on the subject is in order?


David