The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Focaccia Genovese

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hazimtug's picture
hazimtug

Focaccia Genovese

Second time I tried focaccia, using Reinhart's Pain a la Ancienne technique at about 77% hydration. Even though, I could bake on the same day, I further retarded the proofing stage overnight in the fridge. This was our Sunday treat. I was impressed with the airy crumb and the natural sweetness that came with the cold water technique. Herb oil just topped it off...


ehanner's picture
ehanner

Both of your posts today are fantastic! The photos of the Focaccia are beautiful, especially the close up of the edge. It looks good enough to eat.


Eric

SourdoLady's picture
SourdoLady

Nice bread, and absolutely gorgeous pictures! It looks just like I am holding it in my hand, ready to take a bite!! I'm going to have to make some of that, for sure.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Im drooling on my keyboard..this is wonderful focaccia.  I have a very large deep dish pizza pan 14"X1 1/2".  What size pan did you use?  It is very encourageing to see all the new bakers coming to TFL shareing thier gorgeous bakes and photos.  Welcome hazimtug!


Sylvia

hazimtug's picture
hazimtug

Hi Sylvia, cool to see that I can create the same effect over others... That's usually how I feel when I start going through so many wonderful posts on TFL, and I get inspired to try out new breads... This weekend, I tried Hammelman's rustic bread with a little bit of rye and ww flours. I am not impressed. Right now, I am proofing the same ingredients using Reinhart's C&C formula for his award-winning sourdough. I have higher hopes for that one.


Sorry, I digress... This focaccia used 26 oz of flour. For that, I used a circular pan of about 14" in diameter. Reinhart recommends use of a half sheet pan, i.e., 12" x 17". Hope this helps...


Hazim

blackbird's picture
blackbird

very interesting, good photo presentaion

hazimtug's picture
hazimtug

Thanks all for all the nice comments... Taking photos have become part of bread making for me, which I have only started last Fall. In the US, I was really into pizza making after having the opportunity to take a class from Peter Reinhart while living in SF Bay Area. Now that I have some more time on my hands in Cyprus, I've started exploring breads.


I'll keep them coming... May your bread rise :)

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

That looks magnificent!  Now you've got me drooling and longing for a bite!  The focaccia I used to make had mashed potato in it and looked quite similar; does this have potato in it?

hazimtug's picture
hazimtug

Hey Paddy,


Thanks for the comments ;).. No potatoes, only water & some olive oil. I only made this one once. I should try it again sometime soon, see if I can reproduce the results.


Hazim

mmdione's picture
mmdione

Bonjour Hazim,


The bread looks awesome. Could you please post the recipe?


 


Dione

Nancy Baggett's picture
Nancy Baggett

I absolutely agree that using the ice cold water, or Pain a l'Anciennne technique (which Peter actually credits to French baker Phillipe Gosselin) delivers wonderful results: You get great browning, plus a noticeable sweetness and nuttiness of the bread with no extra work. (Food chemists account for this by saying the initial redarded fermentation allows for more enzyme activity due to the yeast being temporarily slowed way down.) The results are so good, I think that eventually it's going to the standard method, and not just for lean doughs like Pain a la Ancienne. I used it to make everything from peasant-style broa and focaccia to enriched home-style white bread and coffeecakes in Kneadlessly Simple, and now it's the only approach I use. Try it, you'll like it!