The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

IN SEARCH OF JEAN LUC POUJAURAN RECIPES

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renteriaboulanger's picture
renteriaboulanger

IN SEARCH OF JEAN LUC POUJAURAN RECIPES

IN SEARCH OF JEAN LUC POUJAURAN.


I am searching for  le gros capmpagne pain recipe from JEAN LUC POUJAURAN BOULANGERIE IN PARIS.


Got a recipe?


poujauran le gros campagne

leucadian's picture
leucadian

 The description in the website where you got the great photo makes this loaf sound very similar to the long slow sourdoughs that several members are quite expert at. Janedo, Dmsnyder, SteveB, MiniOven to name a few.


Stone ground wheat flour preserving the germ = high extraction flour, French 110?.
Levain = wild yeast (sourdough)
Sel de guerande is Jane's preference also, I think.
Slow kneading, double fermentation in bulk, 12-18 hours proofing after shaping all sound like the Anis Bouabsa method that Jane described.


In short, this bread might be very similar to the breads we're already making. Have you tried them?


What's your experience with the bread? It sounds as though the baker has retired, but maybe has licensed the name to another bakery?


Good luck
Stewart


http://www.lehautdupanier.fr/achat/produit_details.php?id=397


Here's the websit description:
Le pain de Jean-luc Poujauran pour le haut du panier.
Ce pain exceptionnel est fait à partir de farine de blé écrasée à la meule de pierre, pour conserver les germes de blés entiers, d\'eau osmosée non déminéralisée et de sel de Guérande.

Il est ensuite pétri très lentement et ensemancé de Levain naturel qui a subi une double fermentation en cuve.

S\'en suit un façonnage manuel et une longue fermentation (de 12h à 18h) et enfin une cuisson sur pierre de lave.

renteriaboulanger's picture
renteriaboulanger

Your information was very useful. Thanks for the suggestions you gave me- I'll have them in mind.


I own a Coffee Shop established in 1992 where I have been baking cakes and desserts on my own; though I only baked bread for me and my family and sometimes friends.


In the search for achieving better results in the last past 2 years I have tasted some Nancy Silverton's recipes, Eric Kayser's, Poilane bread and recently Peter Reinhart "Crust and Crumb Book Recipes".


Everynight is a blast inside my kitchen.


And in the mornings I have to get up very early to prepare deli-sandwiches that my daughters' friends taste and then order at school- that's something I'm enjoying a lot. Because I stay up baking bread at night and using this bread for the lunch's deli-sandwiches.


Bread is my actual passion, and at the same time it's a challenge because the mayority of the recipes ask for certain types of flours that in Mexico aren't available or that have different names or types.


I forgot to tell you that I'm mexican. I lived in the U.S for about 10 years working in Food Restaurant industry as manager and consultant.


These are some of the pictures I've taken of my own personal version of Pain Poilane.


Tomorrow I'll post my recipes.


Sincerely,


Rod Renteria.


 


 

leucadian's picture
leucadian

The pictures look great, and the crumb especially looks moist and tender.


What kind of flour can you get in Mexico? Is it softer than American flour? It's come up several times that flours are different everywhere, and our job is to make good bread with what's at hand. European flours are apparently softer than American flours, and tend to have higher ash content, so the techniques used for them are different from what an American flour requires. 


Where are you in Mexico? It would be interesting to hear more about your baking experience. The panaderias her in San Diego have such an amazing variety of breads, and I'd like to know more about them. Mexican baking is rarely mentioned in our baking books.

renteriaboulanger's picture
renteriaboulanger

 


some pics about my Pain Poilane version.


 


my pain poilane version


 



 



 



 


 


later I will post the recipe about this bread

pattycakes's picture
pattycakes

Where in Mexico are you?


I look forward to your recipe.


Patricia

judyinnm's picture
judyinnm

Do you have a recipe for bolitos?  We get some wonderful ones in Palomas, Chihuahua that have just a hint of sweetness (maybe cinnamon or vanilla?), but I've never found a recipe that turned out like those. 

renteriaboulanger's picture
renteriaboulanger

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FROM "THE BREAD BOOK" Linda Collister & Anthony Blake.

this is the recipe I been used for my Poilane tipe Miches, pictues above.

MICHE POILANE

FRENCH  SOURDOUGH   BREAD

INGREDIENTS:

STARTER

1 ½ cups whole-wheat bread flour (preferably stone-ground)

About 1 cup lukewarm water (95°F -105 F)

 SPONGE

½ Cup lukewarm water (95°F -105 F)

1 cup white bread flour (preferably unbleached and stone-ground)

DOUGH

¼ cup lukewarm water (95°F -105 F)

2 teaspoons kosher salt or flaked sea salt

About 2 to 2 ½ cups white bread flour (preferably unbleached and stone-ground)

 

TO MAKE THE STARTER:

Mix together the flour and enough of the lukewarm water in small bowl to make a very thick batter. Cover  with a damp dish towel  and let stand at room temperature , away from drafts, for three days, so it absorbs the yeasts in the air. Redampen the dish  towel when  necessary.  After three days, the starter should be smelly, gray and only slightly bubbly.

TO MAKE THE SPONGE:

Pour the starter in to  a large bowl, then add the lukewarm water. Stirring to dissolve any lumps in the starter, Add the white bread flour, beat with your hand or a wooden spoon for about 1 minute to make a thick batter . cover with a damp dish towel  and let stand at room temperature , away from drafts , for 24-36 hours or until it is spongy and slightly bubbly.  Redampen the dish  towel when  necessary. The longer you leave the sponge, the more pronounced the sour taste will be.

TO MAKE THE DOUGH:

Stir down the sponge, beat in the lukewarmwater and the salt, then mix in enough white bread flour about one handful at a time to make a soft but not sticky dough.

Turn out the dough onto a  lightly floured  work surface and knead for 10 minutes  until firm, smooth, and elastic, adding more flour as needed.

Return the dough to the bowl  (no need to wash or oil the bowl). cover with a damp dish towel  and let rise at room temperature, away from drafts, until almost doubled in size 8 – 12  hours.

Punch down the dough, cut off 6-8 ounces of the dough (about 1 cup) and set aside for making the next starter. Shape the rest of the dough in to a ball and put into the clothed-lined basket, if using or  onto the prepared baking sheet. The basket gives  the loaf a nice round shape) Cover  with a damp dish towel  and let rise at room temperature , away from drafts, until  almost doubled in size, about 8 hours, subsequent  batches may take less time to rise.

TO BAKE:

Heat the oven 425F if you used the basket, invert the loaf from the basket onto the prepared baking sheet. Using a sharp knife slash the top of the loaf 4 times or make 2 diagonal slashes across the top if you are baking the loaf in a pan sprinkle with a little flour. Bake for 20 min. then lower the oven temperature to 375F  and bake 35-45 min longer or until the loaf sounds hollow when tapped underneath . transfer the loaf to a wire rack and cool completely.

ENJOY  IT  !!!!!!!

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

Did you bake this on a stone? It looks wonderful!

renteriaboulanger's picture
renteriaboulanger

 


BOLILLO MEXICAN STYLE


in some way this is our version of the french baguette, but smaller, faster, in fact our bakers who make this bread are called "FRANCESEROS"


Ingredients: Weight (gr.)
Wheat flour (Esponja, Espiga, o Francesera)
1000
Vegetal grease
30
Water 600– 650
Fresh yeast (*)
30
Sugar
30
Salt
20
Improver 10

 

(*) If you wish you can use the instant dry yeast, only that the quantity will be 1/3 part of the amount of fresh yeast.

How to prepare:

A) Kneading:

1. Place in the blender, mixer or machine to be used all the ingredients.
2. Incorporate the ingredients during 1 minute at low speed
3. Knead at higher speed (depending on the machine used) until getting a waxed and fine mixture (This point can be determined when the mixture begins to separate from the walls of the pan). In this process the refinement is already included.
4. Once the kneading and refinement are finished place the mixture over the working table previously sprinkled with flour.

B) Shaping:

1. Divide the mixture in parts of 85 to 90 grams according to the size required.
2. Shape the desired varieties according to their technique ("Bolillo", "Telera", "Zeppelin", "Baguette", etc.)

C) Fermentation:

1. Let the mixtures, already with the shape of the selected variety, to ferment until they reach twice the original size.
2 fermentation processes can be used, controlled process (Temperature of·32° C to 35° C and Relative Humidity of 70% to 90%) and the room temperature process (Covering-up the trays with a plastic sheet to avoid they get dried and deformed).

D) Finishing:

1. Let the trays to air so they can loose on little bit of moisture.
2. In the case of the "Bolillo" and "Baguette" varieties, incisions (sajado) are made to the surfaces of the mixtures according to their technique.
FOR THE BOLILLO, THE INCISION WILL BE IN THE CENTER, I INCHE FROM THE EDGES, 45° INCLINADED.


E) Cooking:

1. Cook the bread to a temperature of 250° C and 10 seconds of steam (If there is no steamer in the oven, a containers with water can be introduced previously in the oven or sprinkle the bread directly). Cooking time will be of 14 to 17 minutes.


judyinnm's picture
judyinnm

Thank you.  My husband will be delighted to have these beautiful rolls without the day trip. Just the pictures make us hungry for them....