The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

1 lb or 1.5 lb Loaf Pan - Which is more versatile? (Also metal vs. Pyrex pans)

Petrol's picture
Petrol

1 lb or 1.5 lb Loaf Pan - Which is more versatile? (Also metal vs. Pyrex pans)

I'm debating whether to buy a 1 lb or 1.5 lb loaf pan (Chicago Metallic specifically). Is one size more common than the other for sandwich bread recipes? I already have a 8.5 x 4.5 x 2.5 Pyrex loaf pan but I'm not sure what size that equates to in terms of pounds.


Also, can anyone shed some light on metallic vs. Pyrex loaf pan bread baking? I'm new to baking bread (I'm focusing on basic wheat sandwich breads at the moment) and I'm not sure if there are noticeable differences b/t the two, specifically when it comes to bread. I know a lot of it comes down to preference but I'm wondering about adjusting baking temperatures and such when following a recipe. I always seem to have disastrous results when I mess around w/ recipes.


Thanks for the advice!

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

forget glass unless you want a light (very light) crust.  the glass is a poor conductor of heat anf you will not get the same level of carmerazation on the sides of the loaf.


to get a one pound bread wiegh the dough 1 pound 2 ounce and when finished the bread will wiegh 1 pound.


the general rull is the thicher and larger the protuct the lower the oven should be that is so that the crust will not burn before the center is done since it will take longer for the center to reach the finish temp


example using cake a 8 inch cake baked at 375  and the same batter in a 10 or 12 inch pan would bake at 350


breads are the same a one pound open pan baked at 400 and the same dough at 2 and a half in a pullman pan would bake at 375


metal pans are the way to go buy a professional one and you will pass it down to your childern. taken care of it will last for a hundred years.


 

barneyl's picture
barneyl

It's also worth mentioning that because metal pans expand slightly as they heat up in the oven there's less of an issue with the loaf getting stuck in the pan.

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

I use mostly 9x5 inch pans but have found that different manufacturers make 9x5 pans but they are actually different in size which can be frustrating. There can be a good half inch difference in length and width from different sources. I also prefer seamless pans.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I light using pyrex for sandwich bread because I like sandwich bread to have a light crust. I use an assortment of metal and glass pans depending on what I'm baking.


--Pamela

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I also like aluminum pans--I've been using the same inexpensive assortment for over 20 years. I'm not very fond of Chicago Metallic--I've owned a cake pan or two from them and find that whatever I cook in them browns too dark and too quickly. I'm sticking with glass and aluminum.


--Pamela

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I like Pyrex for most breads but I have an assortment of both. Like Norm (nbicomputers) says, the metal transfers heat better and will usually give you a better color on the sides. On the other hand, that's the reason I like the Pyrex, because it slows down the heat rising in the dough, I get a better oven spring than with metal pans. Especially with whole grain loaves or a mix that isn't at least 50% bread flour or AP, I find giving the dough a few extra minutes of spring time before the yeast is killed helps deliver a slightly lighter loaf. Works for me.


Eric

100percentwholegrain's picture
100percentwholegrain

Most of the bread I bake is 100% whole wheat for sandwiches and toast - I like pyrex pans.  I bake 6 loaves at a time at 325 degrees for 35 minutes.


I guess everyone has a preference - do you have a friend you could borrow from to see which you like best before buying pans?


Enjoy checking it out!

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

"I'm debating whether to buy a 1 lb or 1.5 lb loaf pan (Chicago Metallic specifically). Is one size more common than the other for sandwich bread recipes? I already have a 8.5 x 4.5 x 2.5 Pyrex loaf pan but I'm not sure what size that equates to in terms of pounds."


Your 8.5 x 4.5-inch is a 1.5-lb loaf pan, meaning that the dough is scaled at 1.5 pounds for this size pan. Of the two sizes you're considering, it is more commonly called for in recipes. However the 1-pound pan size is nice for sandwich slices if you like them about the same dimensions as store-bought sandwich bread, or can't finish a larger loaf before it goes stale. Mine are 7.5 x 3.75 x 2.25". I reach for them more often than the 1.5-pound pans, but use at least two at a time. I found them at my local Ace Hardware---inexpensive, and aluminum, which is what I prefer for baking pans.


Another size you might like is the Danish loaf pan (KA used to sell it---they also refered to it as a quick bread pan). It is 12 x 4 x 2.5" and produces a loaf about the same size as store-bought sandwich bread. It holds roughly 2 pounds of dough (the same as a 9 x 5" pan). The beauty of this size is that you get more full-size slices and less heals than 2 1-pound loaves.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Mini

enaid.old's picture
enaid.old

The instructions with my oven recommend not using shiny, non-reflective pans.  My pans are dark metal but they are over 40 yrs. old and are probably dark with age.  I never use anything else and they have always been totally satisfactory.  I have never even contemplated using pyrex pans to bake bread.  It's all a matter of personal preference, I suppose.  I like to see the lovely dark crust of a home made loaf.  The pale crust that comes  from a loaf baked in a pyrex pan looks too much like a store bought loaf to me.

suave's picture
suave

I never use pyrex pans for bread, for me it is important for the loaf to have pleasing apperance, and the ones that come out of pyrex just don't look right to me.