The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Substitute freshly milled flour?

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sbeddo's picture
sbeddo

Substitute freshly milled flour?

Hi,
I use freshly milled wheat. I use mill hard-white wheat berries for bread and soft-white wheat berries for cookies/cakes. Can I use a normal Betty Crocker recipe and just substitute my flour for "all purpose" flour? I have gluten/lecithin/dough enhancer to add if needed.

Also, I don't want to use white sugar if possible. Can I just use honey (same measure as sugar) or sucunat (again same measure as sugar)?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I don't see why not. I'm an experimental type. I substitute all the time. Try it and see what happens. Check your packages for equivalents (that's a good one, I can't even read my packages) just in case. Many times I reduce the sugar in recipes. Honey will change flavor so will most sugar syrups, and you might have to reduce or eliminate fluids in the recipe or add more dry ingredients. I avoid sugar substitutes myself. (When it comes to picking my poison, I want to know what I'm dealing with.) Maybe someone else here has experience with sucunat. Have fun... and Welcome to the site! :) Mini Oven

naschol's picture
naschol

Actually, honey doesn't necessarily change the flavor if you use raw, unfiltered honey. What most people associate as taste in honey is actually the burned flavor of pasturized honey. That being said, honey from some flowers is stronger and depending on amount being used in the recipe, may have a slight flavor.

Sucanat has a bit of a brown sugar flavor, so may flavor whatever you are making, again, depending on amount.

Agave nectar is a good sugar sub, too, but it is more liquidy than honey, so you may want to reduce liquid by half the amount of agave nectar used.

As far as the flour substitution, you can sub the freshly milled for AP, but you will need to use more, if measuring by volume. Freshly milled doesn't have a chance to settle like old flour has...

Nancy

sbeddo's picture
sbeddo

Thanks for all your comments! Good to note that freshly milled flour is fluffier as it hasn't had time to settle and pack down like store-bought flour. I will add a bit more to my recipes.
One side note: Sucunat is not a sugar substitute. It is sugar, just not as processed as white sugar. I use it in choc. chip cookies all the time and can tell NO difference. Sucunat comes as plain sucunat (which is more like brown sugar) and Sucunat with Honey which has more of a white sugar taste. Just FYI.

Again, thanks for taking the time to answer.

Shannon, a beginner but loving it!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Now you got me curious and I looked it up. Sucunat is made from cane sugar juice only dehydrated instead of cooked the traditional way. It contains more trace minerals and vitamins and sounds like a lot healthier too. Only the name is it's biggest sales problem, sounds synthetic. Glad to hear it's not. If the process catches on, we will run out of molasses. :) Mini Oven

sbeddo's picture
sbeddo

Hi,
Yes, that's why I use Sucunat with honey, it's more nutritious. I substitute it one for one in any recipe and even use it in my morning coffee. It looks a bit different; it's light brown very small balls. There is no difference in taste in cooked items. If you tasted white sugar and Sucunat-with-honey side-by-side you would notice it's not quite as sugary-sweet as white sugar.

I'm trying to make healthy changes in our diet without any complaints (or better, without them even noticing!) So far I've made 3 changes all with rave reviews: (1) I make all our bread products with freshly milled flour (2) I use Sucuant in place of sugar and (3) I use Real Salt (all natural sea salt) instead of Morton's white salt. (It also has more trace nutrients than regular salt and isn't processed.) I also like the Real Salt, especially in breads. I find it has a more intense salty taste so you need less.

Shannon

Shannon, a beginner but loving it!

tangybread's picture
tangybread

Good changes (:  Do you find the Real Salt to be gritty? I like to use sea salt for the trace minerals but can't get past the feeling that I dropped my bread on the ground when I'm eating it LOL. Some bites are very gritty. I have also used pink Himalayan salt, which doesn't seem to be so gritty and has all those good minerals...BUT it's expensive, so I don't use it all the time. It is absolutely divine sprinkled on a sliced, freshly-picked heirloom tomato, btw...