The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

scoring and spreading query

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rolls's picture
rolls

scoring and spreading query

hi im new to this site but not new to baking bread. what i want to know is, how are you all getting that lovely spreading on your boules and baguettes? i had a look at the scoring tutuorial and it answered all my questions but when i put it into practice the scorings on my baguettes made them look more like sausage rolls. i would really love a little feedback as my main goal these days is to achieve that lovely spreading on the crust (not sure if its referred to as an 'ear' or 'bloom' thanks heaps for any help or tips. by the way im not sure this makes a difference but lately ive been baking with a very moist no knead dough from 'artisan bread in five mins a day'. the bread tastes wonderful but im just working on making it look more professional.

mcs's picture
mcs

rolls,


It might be because you never developed the strength of the dough enough in the first place.  Even with a very wet dough, it's important to have your dough strong enough to hold its own shape.  I haven't used the book you're talking about, so I can't speak specifically to the recipe.  However...
...check out Le Petit Boulanger click on "videos", then on "la coupe classique", and "la coupe des batards"  The videos will download as .wmv files.  You can see what the dough should look similar to when it is scored.  Of course every recipe is different, but this will give you an idea anyway.  It should open up slightly from the scoring, and not just blob out.  Hope this helps.


-Mark


http://TheBackHomeBakery.com

Yundah's picture
Yundah

I've been making this bread for about a month now. It will score pretty nicely and blooms nicely as well. But, I've found that the longer it sits in the fridge the better it blooms (gives the dough time to develop?) 

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

I agree with Yundah, that older ABin5 dough seems to do better with regard to scoring.  It's also harder to get the correct angle with a serrated knife rather than a razor blade or lame, but the serrated knife works better than a razor blade in the very wet ABin5 dough.    I find that scoring is just plain hard because of the wetness. 


Don't score straight up and down, you have to hold the blade at about a 30 degree angle from the bread. 


It does work, I had a lovely "ear" on a loaf last week.  I used the roasting pan method of giving steam (covered the bread for the first 15 minutes with a foil roasting pan instead of water for steaming) and got a beautiful ear, plus a delicious, crackly crust that "sang" for a few minutes when removed from the oven.  Don't know if the ear was because I got just the right angle, or the steaming method had something to do with it. 

Yundah's picture
Yundah

I haven't used the roasting pan method yet.  I'll have to give it a try.  I've been making this a lot using the 6-3-3-13 method; my family inhales it, and, as my work schedule dictates that I experiment on weekends, it lets me keep the guys in fresh, home-made, bread.  (nota bene, I like my weekend stuff the best but... what the heck, I need the pay check.) 

rolls's picture
rolls

is that 'ear' ur talking about like the ones you find on those lovely french baguettes they make like lovely diamond patterns . il try to keep it a little longer in the fridge. ive been looking at lots of videos and they're really helpful. i don't have a lame though or a razor to make those lovely artisanal designs what i have is a good serrated bread knife and a tomato knife.


i tried the folding and stretching technique for the first time when i added some olives and cheese and black pepper to my olive  oil dough that i had left in the fridge. the inside was beautiful in looks n taste but i wasn't too sure about the outside appearance. il try to show pics if i can figure out how to get them on.