The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Fresh Garlic

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Gail's picture
Gail

Fresh Garlic

What is the limit to the amount of fresh minced garlic I can put in a loaf of whole wheat bread. The loaf contains 4 1/2 cups of flour.  We love garlic but I seem to remember reading somewhere That too much and it won't come out right.


 


Gail

baltochef's picture
baltochef

As a general rule, onions and garlic will fare much better in breads if they are sauteed in some oil first..Garlic, especially, will have some of its raw pungency ameliorated by cooking it before adding it into a recipe..I have never wanted to add garlic into the dough of a bread, but I would think that 1-2 large cloves, cooked, would be a good starting point per standard 9" x 5" x 2.5" loaf pan..


You might consider roasting an entire head of garlic in the oven, squeezing out the roasted garlic from the skins, and then weighing out, or accurately measuring the paste in measuring spoons so as to be able to keep accurate notes on the amount of garlic that you like in a particular size loaf of bread / batch of bread dough..


The limit will be what your, or your family's, taste buds and digestive tracts can withstand..


Bruce

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

Roasted garlic in a sourdough is about as close to heaven on earth as I'm ever going to get. Add some sundried tomatoes (the ones packed in oil, thoroughly drained and patted with a paper towel) and some asiago cheese and it's even better.

arzajac's picture
arzajac

I amost fell over after reading that....

gosiam's picture
gosiam

Hi Stephanie, this sounds too wonderful to not inquire.  Would you be so kind and post the recipe for this bread?  Thank you very much.


Gosia

SteveB's picture
SteveB

This sounds very close to TARRP bread:


http://www.breadcetera.com/?p=155


SteveB


http://www.breadcetera.com


 

gosiam's picture
gosiam

Steve, thank you for the link.  I found it on your site a few days ago and quickly marked it for the one to test and taste.  However, I have to use my overly active sourdough mother starter.  Due to time constraints, I bake only on the weekend these days.  I feed the starter on Wed and it is plentiful by Saturday.  Would the recipe for TARRP suffer if I used the sourdough starter instead of the yeast.  And if such a substitution were to work, how much of the starter would I use.


I have seen the thread in regards to yeast:sourdough starter conversion and it suggests:


1 package of active dry yeast = 0.4 oz = 11.3 g


to be replaced with 140 g of the starter minus 70 g of flour and 70 g of water taken from the dough ingredients.


Would you say that this formula should work for your recipe for TARRP?


Many thanks.


Gosia

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Gosia, I don't see why using a starter would be a problem, although with such a full-flavored bread, the flavor imparted by the starter would probably be lost.  I would use anywhere from 30-35% (baker's %) fermented flour so, if my calculations are correct, that would come out to 140 g fermented flour or 280 g of a 100% hydration starter.


SteveB


http://www.breadcetera.com

gosiam's picture
gosiam

Thank you for your prompt reply.  Would you mind explaining to me what you call "fermented flour" - I am still very new to this site and the bread-baking terminology is one of my challenges.


Thank you once more.


Gosia

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Fermented flour, in this case, is the flour portion of the starter you are using in your recipe.


SteveB


http://www.breadcetera.com


 

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

I was going for a crusty, simplistic loaf of sourdough that would work well with a hot turkey, fresh mozzerella, and tomato sandwich.  I used a large amount of roasted garlic (about 6-8 cloves, smashed into a paste), a small amount of the well-drained and patted sundried tomatoes (a little goes a long way when you're wanting it to just flavor and not overpower the bread), and about a scant cup of cheese for 2 long loaves that made about 3 square sandwiches each.


The dough was the basic 1-2-3 sourdough, but the sour got lost as I thought it would. I did some rethinking and the starter at 100% hydration now accounts for half the weight of the flour in the recipe, which gives it more sour flavor. You want the dough to come in at about 75% hydration.  It also needs to be very well developed. My favorite way to do this, since I don't have a stand mixer, is to use my right hand as a dough hook and my left hand to rotate the bowl. It works well, though slowly, and you get good gluten development. Stretching and folding is also necessary. I do it about once an hour for the full 4 hour fermentation period I let this loaf have.  I then proof until just under double on a makeshift couche (natural linen fused with some heavier material) and then bake on a stone until golden brown.


I don't really have an exact recipe yet as I'm still working on the bread, but that's the jist.

Yumarama's picture
Yumarama

KAF has this page on roasting garlic, suggesting (if not used in a presentation) to separate the cloves and roast them whole in 20 minutes, faster and less wasteful than the (albeit better looking on a plate) chopped top whole garlic head.


http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2008/05/01/roasting-garlic-more-than-one-way-to-get-a-head/


If you did a bunch of garlic heads at once, you could squeeze out the garlic and then freeze it in measured amounts (i.e. in table or teaspoon full). Seems like a very handy way to have roasted garlic available all the time. I'd imagine scooping spoonfulls onto a parchment, popping it in the freezer, then once frozen separately, drop them all into a freezer baggie.

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

If you own a cast iron dutch oven or chicken fryer with a tight fitting lid you can use it to "roast" garlic on the stove top. Click on this link - http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f17/easy-stove-top-roasted-garlic-using-cast-iron-30024.html - if you're interested in how to do it.


This method uses less energy than heating my oven (I don't own a toaster oven or microwave).


One caveat - don't use enameled cast iron - the dry heat could crack the enamel coating.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Gail,
I usually roast the garlic in a toaster oven in a foil packet with a little olive oil poured over the cut off top. The trick is to mash the roasted cloves lightly and add them in the early stages of mixing along with the oil and maybe some extra oil for the softness of a savory loaf. I tried leaving the cloves whole but they create a pocket during baking and fall out after slicing. Much better mashing . I have used a whole head of roasted garlic in a single 1.5 Lb loaf.


Another thing that tastes great is infusing rosemary in a few tablespoons of warmed Olive Oil overnight. Garlic rosemary savory loaf is all you could ask for in life IMHO.


Eric

gosiam's picture
gosiam

Hello All,


I have freely asked questions, on this thread, even though the questions were not directly related to Gail's inquiry about fresh garlic in bread.  I hope people did not mind my taking everybody off topic.  On another note, Stephanie and SteveB - thank you for your patient answers to my questions.  You are all such a wealth of knowledge.


Best Regards,


Gosia