The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Irish Batch Loaf

peckerdunne's picture
peckerdunne

Irish Batch Loaf

Any recipes for batch bread (or batch loaf) as made in Ireland.


AFAIK its known as Plain Bread in Scotland so probably different names around the world.


Its got a hard and dark top-crust. Baked in batches so soft at sides. Here's the best picture I could find on the web.


http://www.irwinsbakery.co.uk/filestore/images/product/280px/nk-half-loaf.jpg

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I looked at the ingredients of Nutty Krust bread--pretty simple list (Wheat Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast, Soya Flour, Emulsifiers (E471, E481), Calcium Propionate, Dextrose).


http://www.irwinsbakery.co.uk/products/product/10/irwins-nutty-krust/


Then I found this recipe:


http://www.globalchefs.com/recipe/dessert/web/des020brew.htm


--Pamela

peckerdunne's picture
peckerdunne

Thanks Pamela,


As you say, the ingredient list is not too exotic.


I wonder is it something to do with oven temperature as the texture of a batch loaf is different to a standard loaf, its a bit crumblier.


I'll try that recipe this afternoon and report back.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

The type of flour used might be important here too. I don't know what kind of flour differences there are between US brands and UK brands.


--Pamela

peckerdunne's picture
peckerdunne

Could be.


On this side of the pond, we use 'strong bread flour', as they call it. Typical protein content around 12.5g per 100g. I think a lot of it comes in from Canada so probably similar to what you can get. Although, because of the climate, Ireland wasn't able to grow wheat with a high protein content, so they milled plain flour, around 10g/100g, (hence Irish soda bread which doesn't need gluten for the rising process) so I might try a mixture of plain and bread flour.


I tried that recipe that you pointed me towards. I heated the oven to 250C and put in the dough for 10 minutes, spraying every 2 minutes. I then turned the oven down to 200C for 30 minutes. It turned out OK but didn't get the results I was hoping for. The crust was chewy but the inside was a bit moist. Next time I'll leave the heat up for 15 minutes.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I think you are on to something here. Try making it with just all-purpose flour (some brand that has a lower protein content).


I found a mail order UK site that lists various types of flour and their protein contents:


http://www.shipton-mill.com/shop/White-Flours.html


I have an old cookbook from England and it has a recipe for plain white bread (1/2 oz. fresh yeast, 4 cups AP flour, 1 1/4 cups lukewarm water, pinch of sugar, 1 T salt).


--Pamela


 

peckerdunne's picture
peckerdunne

Experiment #2.


I used 100g plain flour & 500g bread flour.


15 minutes at 250C, spraying every few minutes& 1 hour at 180C.


The crust was thick and chewy but the inside as a bit holey. Not exactly a batch loaf but pretty pleased with it though.


 

peckerdunne's picture
peckerdunne

Irish batch bread typically has a chewy top and bottom crust with soft sides. To replicate the soft sides, I made a wooden frame from 150x25 timber. The outside dimensions are 280x150mm.


Recipe:
1.25 teaspoon yeast
400gm strong flour
200gm plain flour
25gm butter
1.5 teaspoon salt
400ml water


Use the dough setting on your breadmaker.
Rub oil on the wooden form to prevent sticking.
Divide the dough into two pieces and shape into balls.
Place these in the wooden form on an oiled baking tray and allow to rise until doubled in size


Bake at 250deg C for 15 minutes. Spray the oven with water every few minutes.
Continue baking at 180deg C for 45 minutes until the crust is brownish.


See photos at http://www.flickr.com/photos/24241984@N02/

bmorrell's picture
bmorrell

What kind of wood did you use for the frame on Irish batch bread? I used pine but I got a hint of wood on the bread.

peckerdunne's picture
peckerdunne

I used pine as well. Your timber is probably a bit more resinous than the stuff that I picked up. It should dry up after a few times in the oven. You could always think of it as a bonus (if you like the taste, that is:-)


 

This Day's picture
This Day

Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book (Random House, New York) has a recipe for Scottish Sponge Bread.  It calls for proving and baking four loaves side-by-side in a 10-inch by 16-inch pan.  The loaves support each other while rising and develop the tall, thin shape characteristic of loaves of Scottish or Irish batch bread.  I tried it once and was pleased with the shape of the loaves.  I used a roasting pan that had approximately the same measurements as the pan suggested by the recipe.  I lived in Scotland for a year and loved the batch bread.


 


 


 

bmorrell's picture
bmorrell

I don't no what I'm dong wrong I'm using the same yeast as I do with know knead bread and I get a perfect rise. this is my 3rd attempt and the the batch loaf will only rise about 3" the taste is there. Can any one help I use fleischmann"s ActiveDry yeast.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

To use active dry yeast, you just dissolve it in part of the water contained in the recipe. The water should be lukewarm.


--Pamela

peckerdunne's picture
peckerdunne

Hi B.


I used Dove Farm Quick Yeast. 


This link might be of use to you.


http://www.dovesfarm.co.uk/detail.html?itemId=326&categoryId=141


Best of luck. It took about 5 or 6 tries before I got the results I was happy with.

bmorrell's picture
bmorrell

 Thank s guys for the replys.  I'm in the USA upper mid west Minnesota, I had to break down the recipe, and this is what I came up with.


   Strong flour is (Bread flour) over here


   Plain flour is   (All purpose flour) I have used tow different yeasts frist batch ActiveDry yeast I got a 3" rise 2nd try I used quick rise yeast the same 3", for the 3rd time yesterday I used ActiveDry yeast again and I disolved it in luke warm water like Pamela said to do a little better    I gained a inch my bread now is at 4". Still not sure what I'm doing wrong. I have even put he bread in the oven for a more stable temp for it to rise, the oven being off ofcourse.


  I'm wondering if I should try using selfrising flour instead of all purpose.


The flavor of the bread is like it should be, but it is a very small loaf.  My wife thinks I should double the recipe, but that would be a great amount of flour.


Thanks for the advise

peckerdunne's picture
peckerdunne

Hi B.


The batch loaf isn't as spongy as most types of white bread so shouldn't rise as much, I reckon. If the flavour is right, your wife might be right, increasing the ingredients might do the trick.


I don't have a loaf made at the moment and didn't take a photo of the loaf in the wooden form but from memory, it was around 5" - 5.5" in the centre of the loaf. It didn't come over the gunwales anyways.


Happy Independence Day, BTW.

tjkoko's picture
tjkoko

FWIW KA Flour sells an Irish Wholemeal Flour which is a coarsely ground, soft, red, whole wheat flour clocking in at 10.7% protein.  It's used for making Irish Soda Bread and is listed here:


http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/king-arthur-irish-style-wholemeal-flour-3-lb

bmorrell's picture
bmorrell

I think I found a better way to get a better rise out of my Loaf Pour warm water 400ml in bowl. Water should be just warm to the touch about 90-100 degrees. Add  yeast. Stir to disolve the yeast, let this sit about 10 minutes.Add butter Add 2 cups of flour and salt and beat until smooth. Gradually add the remaining flour until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl.Knead with a dough hook on a mixer or by hand until the dough is smooth and elastic.Now follow the recipe as before.