The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Panettone Mould

shi's picture
shi

Panettone Mould

I was planning on trying a panettone recipe but it uses a paper panettone mould which I dont have. Can anyone suggest any other alternative - can I use greased brown paper bag or is there any way of making one at home.

Ricardo's picture
Ricardo

A flour pot or Spanish glazed terracotta pot, smear butter in the inside and cover with baking paper pour the mixture and let it rise covered then bake

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Try using a round deep cake pan. (Check out camping gear, maybe there is a deep round pan, or a very large coffee can.) If you have baking paper or parchment, you will need round piece with the diameter: width of pan plus 2x depth plus 1 cm. If you fold the paper like a paper napkin (keep track of the middle) and keep folding like for cutting out a snow flake, you can cut a circle and have most of your folding done for you. A panettone paper is like a giant muffin cup. After you have a large circle cut, invert it onto your cake pan and to establish the bottom, and fold to mark. Now with the circle folded in half, make small tapered fan folds from the base line to the outside edge (like a paper fan, back and forth). Open and carefully put into cake form. Use a few clothes pins to hold if you don't have enough hands. Another way would be to cut a base and then the sides to line. If I had no parchment paper, I would butter and crumb the cake pan. :) Mini Oven

shi's picture
shi

Mini thanks for the help. I have cake pans and bread pan but will the dough rise properly. I saw a recipe for an italian sweet bread in which the dough rises up a lot i mean like a flower pot shape and this was achieved with the help of a paper mould.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

You could be right, the paper might keep it from shrinking back down or falling. I know the dough sure does stick to the paper. I have lots of good memories of chewing the dough off it to get every crumb. I would make a road trip to Italy just to get one. (It goes well with a dark sweet red wine.) I know that with Angel Food cake the sides are not greased so that it sticks and when cool, a knife is used to release the cake. I was thinking about your paper bag, is that a lunch type bag? I would still be worried about the glue. ( you could cut off the bottom) I take it your recipe calls for yeast. Rising shouldn't be a problem. Do you add stiffly beaten egg whites as well? Cake Flour? I take it you have no paper... Do what you think best. I would use a proper casserole before a flower pot, the glazes may contain lead, something you might not want in food. The following site might be useful:

http://www.novacartusa.com/mold.html
Looks more modern now... these molds are designed for bake sale, a very popular Italian tourist item, the forms make transportation of the cakes much easier. I wouldn't get too upset if I didn't have one unless you're selling them. Do you deliver to China? :) Mini Oven

shi's picture
shi

CHINA! lol no Mini I live in India thats why I have problem in finding proper baking equipments. In fact i had to wait for 3 months to get my bread pan. All I can find are round or square baking pans. Have been wanting to make muiffins but no muffin pans not even cupcake moulds :( I think i'll try finding parchemnt paper and with cake pan as base make a mould with the paper :)should i butter the parchment paper. Do you think butter paper will do. I am very new to bread baking but thanks to this site I have always been able to turn out a good loaf. Since the panettone recipe is real time consuming and needs lots of dried fruits etc. so I want to be absoultely sure bout every thing before I try it out. There is a recipe at www.abellecuisine.com by Nick Malgieri have you seen it. If you have any good recipe do share it with me.
shi

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Gosh, I hope we're talking about the same thing. My baking paper or parchment is designed for the oven. I don't have to grease it and nothing sticks to it.
If you insist on using paper, I would stick to the brown paper bag, bite into it and see if it has an after taste. Butter paper might work, you could go around and around to make it stiffer and then fold over a cm to make a nice edge. No butter, or are we talking about the paper off the butter package? What about aluminum foil? While we're winging it, do you have an aluminum shop near you? Maybe you could get a piece to collar your cake pan, or have one made. The muffin cup thing is easy, use coffee cups or small bowls and smear 'em good or use foil, doubled and shape over glass, grease and crumb. My last loaf was in a stoneware casserole with a lid on. It still browned under the lid. I can only guess at how large your mold must be. There must be some kind of guide. Just thinking about your project makes my mouth water. I can't open the site by Nick but that doesn't suprise me, we're often censored as to what we can pull up. Do you have a sauce pan that might fit the bill? (removing handles) Important that the sides be straight or slant out for easy removal.
I think Grease and crumb (use bread, cookie, or grated nuts) is your best bet for the pan. Forget the paper. You can always use two pans, keep your eye on them, your baking time will be shorter. Use the wooden pick test. Place a dish towel over the pan to catch the cake and gently roll over and see if it falls out. If it doesn't let it stand 10 minutes and try again, then set it down gently to cool on a rack. When cool, it can go into a plastic bag if it lasts that long..... Bye, :) Mini Oven

shi's picture
shi

hi there I think u are online right now. lol have I confuded u. I think I'll be able to get butter paper(no not the paper in which butter is wraped, the real thing) and i have aluminium foil at home Then its settled that when i make panettone ill use aluminium foil to make a cylindericaL shape using my cake pan(its i think what is called 8 inches in diameter)as base and i'll butter the aliminium foil and if this not work out I can always use two cake tins. Mini I and for that my husband have never tried panettone;) so even if it does not turn out as good as the real thing it will be ok and there is always next time. Hope every thing goes fine: )
shi

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Sounds good! No, I'm not confused. (But I could picture butter wrapper stuck on the bottom, lol! I probably did it once.) Nice thought, thanks. You could even use a combination butterpaper and aluminum foil. Panettone always reminds me of butterflies and being barefoot.
... Nanjing China but a little north-west. Most of the countries I've been in were very rustic, but it is modern here, much more than I expected. I can't really call this camping. (knock on wood) But If this typhoon comes here, I'll have to bake ahead before the power goes off and I have to evacuate to the mountains. Hope it stays out to sea. Enjoy :9 Mini Oven

jkandell's picture
jkandell

Any round small container that can take the oven will do.  Coffee cans are great.  Line it with parchment paper--cut a circle then a tube.  The tube can come out over the top of the container quite a bit and still hold it's shape.  Paper clip to hold in place.  Or buy panettone molds by mail.

issaquahbaker's picture
issaquahbaker

I haven't read through all the comments, but in case no one else has mentioned it - use a coffee can, well buttered.  I think this is by far the most common thing to use in place of regular panettone pans, be they paper or metal.  For a large panettone, you can get a 2-5lb coffee can(s) and empty it(them) - if you don't plan on using the coffee, buy the cheapest you can so it's not such a waste.  It'll still be cheaper than buying a regular pan or paper pans in the long run.  If you use 2lb cans, simply make several panettone.  A 5lb can will make a huge one and will end up pretty dark on the sides due to longer baking.


If you can't find coffee cans like this, what about making mini panettones in used and thoroughly cleaned soup/vegetable cans?  I see this done all the time and unless you never buy and use these types of cans, they're free.  Just make sure you don't use ones that are coated on the inside.  They should be metal inside and out - soak in soapy water and clean off the labels.  Grease well and plop in small amounts of dough that come up to about the halfway mark of the can.  You'll get a nice rise and they will puff up over the edge of the can.


If you want your panettone to be light and fluffy like commercial ones, turn the cans upside down after removing from the oven like you would for angel food cake.  This can be tricky to do, however.  Most of the panettone pans I've seen have a lip or handles on the side that can be placed on something to hold them up for cooling.  I'm not sure how you'd do it with soup cans or a big coffee can, though.  Even if you don't do this, it should turn out tasty.  Just not quite as fluffy.