The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Rocky Mountain Milling Flours?

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ryeaskrye's picture
ryeaskrye

Rocky Mountain Milling Flours?

Has anybody had experience with any of these flours from Rocky Mountain Milling?



  • Aspen - An all purpose organic wheat flour made from a chosen blend of hard red winter wheats; produces quality results in a variety of baked goods including quick breads, flat breads, tortillas, soft rolls, breading/batters, and biscuits.

  • Boulder - A superior high gluten organic wheat flour made from select hard red spring wheats; ideal for hearth breads, bagels, hard rolls, croissants, and thin pizza crusts.

  • Columbine - A premium organic bread wheat flour milled from a blend of hard red spring and winter wheats selected for their gluten quality; excellent for variety and pan breads, hard and soft rolls, thick pizza crusts, and puff pastries.


I'm going to be driving past their mill and thought I would stop and purchase a 50lb bag of one of the flours. Any input would be appreciated.


 

maurdel's picture
maurdel

I've used both Boulder and Columbine. Both are very good. I was making mostly sandwich loaves of 50/50 with whole wheat, and often (which means all Summer long) in the bread machine. I appreciated the high gluten content of the Boulder for that blend. I also did some country french boules (nice and chewy) and both were also great for pizza doughs.


 I believe those organic Rocky Mtn. Milling were  the most flavorful flours I've used yet.

ryeaskrye's picture
ryeaskrye

If you had to choose one, mostly for white sourdoughs and baguettes, which would you choose?


The Boulder with 13% protein is interesting, but the Columbine is still 11.4% and has a higher ash content. It is available in an "untreated" state, meaning it has no added minerals, vitamins or other ingredients...just straight flour.


John

maurdel's picture
maurdel

Yes, I think the Columbine for baguettes and such.


When you say it is available "untreated", is that only true for the Columbine, or all those organic selections?


Sure wish I could find that flour in the stores, and in smaller bags.....well maybe 25lbs.

Strawbale99's picture
Strawbale99

Hi!

I just now found this post.  I used to be the specialty bread baker at Rocky Mountain Milling.  I can tell you that it is very good flour.  It is still what I use for white flour.  I only use organic flour and for whole wheat I mill my own.  All of their organic line is untreated (no added ascorbic acid, or vitamins added back in after they were killed off...).  They have a really low protein pastry flour ( I'm having a brain cramp for it's name) that is nice for a true french loaf; Then Aspen which runs about a 9-10 in protein, then Columbine which is about an 11 -12, then Boulder which is about a 14.  They are a nice natural creamy color and I have loved them for 11 years now!!  As far as I know they are only available in the 50 lb. bags.   And I love The Fresh Loaf!  Happy Baking ~

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

If it's the same Rocky Mountain Milling I'm thinking of, they were bought by Bay State Milling.

http://www.bsm.com/rockymountainmilling/ 

amish_hooligan's picture
amish_hooligan

Thanks for your post.   I'm located in Colorado and am searching for organic whole wheat berries.  The sources I've found so far want as much or more than the cost of already milled flour.  Can you suggest places to look?  I even asked at RMFM but they only sell milled flour, not whole berries.

Thanks again.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

They have just about every grain I want in conventional and organic.

http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/buy_wheat_whole_grain_red_white_wheat_berries_making_bread_flour.aspx

They're located in Nebraska, so Zone 1 shipping rates (i.e. cheapest shipping) apply for Colorado. They have regular sales on both grain and grain shipping too.

As for where to buy them locally in Colorado, I don't know. I just buy milled flours from Vitamin Cottage. You'll find 20 or so of them in the refrigerated section, including spelt, rye, and buckwheat.

WyBuckskin's picture
WyBuckskin

One of the best sources in Colorado is Golden Organics, in Golden, Colorado.  They have a web page, goldenorganics dot net, where you can look through their catalog and locate what you need.  Most big cities have groups who order regularly from them, thus saving on shipping costs. 

If you use a large amount, there is a good source in Nebraska, a farmer owned mill.  A group of us bought a ton of organic wheat and split it up, sharing the shipping cost, and getting a discount for a large order.  Try John at fehringerfarms dot com.

Dragonbones's picture
Dragonbones

We've sourced some bulk flour here in Taiwan labelled  "Organic Columbine 830900", Product of the USA, with no info on protein content, although it does list fortification ingredients (niacin, iron, Vit. C, etc.). I'm wondering whether anyone can tell me whether this "Columbine" is a generic term which could have been produced by more than one mill, or whether it is a proprietary name, indicating that it came from a specific mill such as the above-mentioned Rocky Mountain Milling? I'm trying to get the protein info, in particular, but the local provider only said it was medium-low gluten, which conflicts with the "premium organic bread wheat flour" and "11.4%" info in earlier posts.

amish_hooligan's picture
amish_hooligan

I'm not aware of any other mills using the name Columbine.

I have the data sheet.  The product code matches what you have (830900) and the reported protein level is in fact 11.4 +/- 0.4.

You might ask them to email you the data sheet. 

 

Dragonbones's picture
Dragonbones

Thanks, Amish -- I've emailed them, and just received the data sheet. Protein is 11.4 +/- 0.4%.

WyBuckskin's picture
WyBuckskin

I have been using Columbine for many years, mainly for sourdough bread, and have been very happy with it.  I keep my starter with it so that the starter is neutral, then after refreshing and saving back my reserve, I can mix the neutral natural yeast with rye or red wheat or kamut or whatever I want.  The results are great.

My problem now is where to purchase the flour.  There used to  a small organic co-op in Colorado Springs which would order RMM Columbine for me.  That store closed permanently, and I am trying to find a replacement.  I asked at Natural Grocers and Whole Foods, and neither wants to handle that type of ocassional order.  Do any of you know an outlet in the Colorado Springs or Denver area?

Thanks.