The Fresh Loaf

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new mill, need advice

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Karen the Mouse's picture
Karen the Mouse

new mill, need advice

I was thrilled to find a Magic Mill II for $15 at a yard sale. I've started milling flour and baking breads with the freshly milled flour and am amazed at how much better the taste and texture are with fresh flour. I also find that I can make a 100% whole wheat loaf which isn't gritty or heavy, something I've never succeeded in doing with whole wheat flour I've bought at the store.


I was able to download a manual for my mill, but it left me with some questions:


1) How fine do I want to grind my flour? I know this depends on the kind of bread I'm making, but if someone would give me some general guidelines, I'd appreciate it.


2) What can I grind in the Magic Mill? I've done wheat, barley and spelt. Can I do corn? What kind of corn? Chickpeas? Any other beans? Anything else?


3) Where can I find some good recipes for breads made with freshly ground grains? Can someone direct me to a good website or a book? I've baked breads for years, so I'm pretty comfortable with experimenting, but I'd like some new ideas, especially ideas for incorporating less common flours like chickpea or barley.


4) Any warnings on what to do or what not to do with my Magic Mill?


I'd appreciate any guidance or suggestions anyone has.


Karen

sharonanne's picture
sharonanne

I was thrilled to find a Magic Mill II for $15 at a yard sale. [Congrats on your found treasure! I've owned mine for 30 years, so I don't know if yours is the same as mine. So I will speak in generalites.]


1) How fine do I want to grind my flour? [Facing MY grinder]


a) Bread Flour: dial back lever STRAIGHT UP [12:00]


b) All Purpose: dial back lever to the LEFT [10:00]


c) Pastry Flour: dial back lever to the LEFT [all the way]


d) Coarse Rye: aka pumpernickel, dial back lever to the RIGHT [2:00]


e) Cracked Grain: dial back lever to the RIGHT [not quite all the way]


f) FULLY opens the stones: dial lever to the RIGHT [all the way]


 


2) What kind of corn? [buy popcorn] Chickpeas? [yes]


Any other beans?  In place of 1/4 cup of the bread flour, [small white beans] but add extra vital wheat gluten also. How about [black beans, garbonzo beans, or pinto beans, etc.] to make instant bean dips!


Anything else? You name it [kamut, lentils, millet, oat groats, Vitamin C - 250 mg per loaf] Clean your stones, by grinding wheat, thereafter.


 


3) Where can I find some good recipes for breads made with freshly ground grains? Can someone direct me to a good website? [KingArthurFlour.com]


or a book? [The Bread Bible, by Rose Levy Beranbaum & Bread Baker's Apprentice, by Peter Reinhart]


I've baked breads for years, so I'm pretty comfortable with experimenting, but I'd like some new ideas, [visit my website sharonanne.com and drop me an email - I SHARE a free online class, which you will LOVE]


especially ideas for incorporating less common flours like chickpea or barley. [email me, I know of a nice Oat & Barley Bread]


 


4) Any warnings on what to do or what not to do with my Magic Mill? [You DON'T want to harm your stones, i.e. glazing is caused by moisture or fat content.


a) ALWAYS clean your stones, by grinding 1 cup of wheat after each [combined] cup of ANYTHING else, besides whole grains [barley, kamut, oat groats, spelt, .


b) NEVER grind soybeans, too high in moisture and fat.


c) NEVER wet your stones.


 


I'd appreciate any guidance or suggestions anyone has. [Happy to help]


Warmly,


Sharon Anne


http://sharonanne.com

Karen the Mouse's picture
Karen the Mouse

Thanks for the suggestions. I ordered The Bread Bible from the public library, but haven't gotten it yet.


I'm eager to try some corn for cornbread, but have a bit of cornmeal in the closet I want to use up first. I'll try popcorn when I'm ready.


I'll try your guidelines for how fine to grind.


 


Karen

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

NEVER USE A TWO-STEP MILLING PROCESS WITH A MICRONIZER MILL


...like your Magic Mill. It will damage your mill.


Some TFL members, such as proth5 and bwraith, mill grain twice and sift some of the bran out after the first milling. This approach mimicks some of the speciality whole grain flours that remove some of the outer part of the bran. It should never be attempted with a micronizer mill.


GRINDING BEANS


I would avoid soy beans unless the manual explicitly says they may be milled (due to the high oil content). Garbanzos (aka chick peas) are large so make sure they can flow through the hopper. You might experiment with milling ordinary brown lentils into flour (coarse grind) and adding a small amount to bread. Lentil flour gives an interesting flavor but don't use too much, as it can make for a heavy bread.


GRINDING CORN


Some micronizer mills cannot handle field corn (aka dent corn). Check your manual. If you want corn flour try using popcorn kernals instead (the manual for my Nutrimill recommends this and another TFL member has done it and reported excellent results). You should set the mill to the coarsest setting for grinding popcorn.


GRINDING WHITE RICE


Rice flour great is for dusting a couche or cloth-lined rising baskets (aka bannetons). Mill your own rice flour using any brand of inexpensive white rice. Short grain white rice (sometimes called "pearl rice") is a little better than long grain white rice for milling rice flour, since the grains are slightly softer.


If you need to clean the mill, I would suggest using the cheapest (refined) white rice you can find. It serves the same purpose as using grain.


==================


Check out Mike Avery's discussion of micronizer mills in this TFL post http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/3793/kernals-or-berries#comment-24400

Karen the Mouse's picture
Karen the Mouse

Okay, I'll avoid grdining soybeans and I like the idea of using cheap white rice to clean the mill.


I'm making bread for subs for Superbowl Sunday today!


Karen

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

Karen the Mouse on February 1, 2009 wrote:
I'm making bread for subs for Superbowl Sunday today!

Are you using home milled flour for them?


Let us know how they came out.


Thanks - SF

Karen the Mouse's picture
Karen the Mouse

Yes, I used mostly wheat, but at the end of the milling I tossed in a handful of barley and quinoa. This is the first time I've used quinoa and I thought it gave a slightly "off" flavor to the bread. It wasn't noticeable in the subs; the sub fixings overwhelmed it, but when I tried the bread plain, I thought it was a bit off.


The subs were good, though, and I appreciate being able to make them with fresh, whole-grain flour.


Karen

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

Karen the Mouse on January 25, 2009 wrote:
Where can I find some good recipes for breads made with freshly ground grains?

The recipe links below all use a substantial amount of whole grain flour(s). Many (but not all) are specifically for home-milled flour.


Multigrain and Whole Wheat Recipies from TFL Members
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/9115/new-recipe-whole-wheat-sourdough
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/3057/sourdough-whole-grain-sandwich-loaf
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4277/multigrain-struan
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4737/finally-10
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4927/100-ww-dinner
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/1299/supermarket-whole-wheat-bread#comment-3923 (100% spelt bread)
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4737/finally-100-whole-grain-hearth-bread-i039m-proud
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/5136/success-jmokney039s-formula-100-whole-grain-sourdough-hearth-breads
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/6345/multigrain-oatmeal-sandwich-bread
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/5500/pierre-nury%E2%80%99s-rustic-light-rye-leader
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4927/100-ww-dinner-rolls
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/7507/grinding-own-wheat#comment-38209 (recipes using home milled flour)


Whole Grain Breads from Elsewhere
http://www.applepiepatispate.com/bread/honey-wheat-sandwich-bread-whole-grain/
http://www.breadtopia.com/whole-grain-sourdough/
http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2007/09/11/sourdough-english-muffins/


A Few Recipies for Arabic Whole Grain Breads and Snacks
Recipes culled from the blog arabicbites.blogspot.com. The authors used to post in TFL.
http://arabicbites.blogspot.com/2007/11/sambosa-bel-joben.html
http://arabicbites.blogspot.com/2008/02/al3ish-albalady-egyptian-flat-bread.html
http://arabicbites.blogspot.com/2007/10/meedos-funky-flat-bread.html


General Discussion of Bread Baking with Whole Grain Flours
This link is from the San Franciso Baking Institute Newsletter, Winter 2007. It requires Adobe Reader (or similar pdf reader).
http://www.sfbi.com/pdfs/SFBINewsWI07.pdf


 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Was touring a Korean Folk Village and ran across this gem. 


It is gray granite (typical of the region) and hand powered.  The dry soybeans are first soaked and the mixture is slowly added through a hole in this two-stone mill.  By rotating the mill in a clockwise direction, the slurry is then pressed out sideways and runs down the wooden form where it is caught in another container.   I personally tested this model.


Korean Soybean Mill

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

...did you make bean curd from the soybean slurry?


In his book The Book of Tofu W. Shurtleff talks about these. I think there's an illustration also.

100percentwholegrain's picture
100percentwholegrain

Hi Karen,


Congrats on getting a mill - I think you'll love it!  Here's a recipe I've used for raspberry pastry using 100% whole wheat (soft white) and it turns out great every time.  Perfect for something a little fancy, too!


Here's the recipe: whole wheat bread


Have fun :)

cctiger2's picture
cctiger2

Hey everyone,  


I also recently aquired a MagicMill stone grinder.  So far I've only done Hard Red Wheat, but I'm thrilled with it!!  :)


My question is:  Will grinding flax seed cause any problems?


I believe flax seed has a higher oil content than many things, would this be a problem?  Has anyone tried it?


Also - is there anything maintenance wise I should know about this machine?  The one I have is very similar to the one pictured here:  http://img388.imageshack.us/img388/2959/df4f20rh0.jpg


White rice to clean the stones makes sense to me.  Is there anything I need to lubricate, clean, etc. anywhere else?  


Thank you!


 

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I don't have this kind of mill, but I think flax seed is pretty high in fat. I think you might be better off trying to grind it in your food processor. Ground flax seed seems more like a "meal" to me than a flour.


--Pamela

Troy Larsen's picture
Troy Larsen

I realize that my Nutrimill is not a Magic Mill.  But, I like the taste and smell of the flaxseed in my WW bread.  I always use a food processor to break up the flaxseed, except about two weeks ago.


Two weeks ago, I had the bright idea of adding the flaxseed to the wheat in the grinder.  It was mixed in, but was in a specific area of the overall amount of grain in the hopper.  When the grinder got to the flaxseed section, the motor speed changed and it started making a different noise.  Thankfully there was wheat passing though after the flaxseed to clean it out.


Although it worked well for the bread, I will not try that again.


I think that if I had been milling flaxseed only, I would have made a mess of the Nutrimill.  Flaxseed is probably too high of an oil content.

SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

Usually I only need a small amount of flaxseed meal (and it is more of a meal than a flour due to the oil, as mentioned above). I find that my cheap-o $10 coffee grinder does the job if I only need 1/4 cup or so. Granted, you can also do multiple batches. Flaxseed and spices are the only thing I self-grind as I don't use either fast enough for them to not go rancid (flax seed meal has a short life once opened) or lose their oomph.