The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

granola

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

granola

Was the hot word back in the mid to late 70s


many bakeries wanted to jump in the trend of the day and not miss out on the starting of a new market.  Trend seems to live here as i am seeing more and more posts about multy grain breads.


well in those days i was called in to do R & D to develop such products.  The problem  getting a product that will meet the requirments of being multi grain (granola) but tasting good enough to get someone to come back and buy it over and over again


below is the formula that was deloped for granola bread (it is a small shop formula. since many of the members here know me i woun't explain why)


Brown Sugar  6 Oz
salt 3 Oz
Dry skim milk 4 oz
wheat germ 2 oz
soy flour 3 oz
Potato flour 4 oz
rolled oats or bakers bran  or a combnination of oats and bakers bran 10 oz
corn meal (yellow course) 6 oz
Pumpernickel flour 10 oz
Malt syrup (non diastatic) 3 0z
Molasses (dark) 4 Oz
Water 4 lb


Mix and let sit for 10 minutes


water 2 Lb
yeast fresh 10 Oz (or 5 Oz Instant)


Whole wheat flour 1 Lb 2 Oz
bread Flour 11.5 to 12.6 proten) 6 lb


start the mixer and add the yeast and water solution on top of the flour or crumble in fresh yeast with the flour
when a dough is formed ADD Shortening 6 oz


raisins optional to taste


and mix to a smoth dough


temp out of the mixer should be no hoter than 80 F.


one rise then shape into loafs or rolls
proof in a moist place because this bread will dry on the surface alow 3/4 proof


wash with water and top with seeds, oats , bran, a combination, or leave plain


bake at 390 to 400 with steam 

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

Hrm. I'd LOVE this in baker's percentage. Granola is one of my favorite things.

RFMonaco's picture
RFMonaco

Flour = 100%, salt = 2.1%, brn.sugar = 4.3%, Sk.milk = 2.8%, Oat or bran = 7.2%, malt syrup = 2.1%, molasses = 2.9%, yeast, instant = 3.6%, water = 69%, shortening = 4.3%

Klutzy's picture
Klutzy

I love multi-grain breads. How many loaves does this make? Can I substitute butter or oil for the shortening? Are the liquids measured in fluid ounces or weight? I think a pound of water the same as 16 oz/2 cups, but I'm not sure about the malt and molasses. Thank you.


I wonder if someone has a recipe for granola cereal that is fairly low in fat but crunchy and clumpy?

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

any fat will do if using oil add it at the start.


this is a shop formula and will make about 16 1 lb breads so reduces it to your needs