The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Mixers, Ovens and Bread Slicers

Gluten Free Pam's picture
Gluten Free Pam

Mixers, Ovens and Bread Slicers

I'm starting a local bakery, and would be glad for anyone's input on equipment.  I'm making gluten free breads and cinnamon rolls.  My sweet great-niece was diagnosed with celiac disease just over a year ago and she missed having baked good so much that I had to do something about it.  After months of experiments (my dogs have gotten fat off the rejects) I've worked out some recipes.  The folks in the local celiac support groups want more of my stuff and local stores would like to carry my bread, so I'm taking the leap forward, but could use some opinions on equipment.


Years ago I baked with stacked gas deck ovens, 12" cavity height, and loved them.  I think they were Blodgett, but not sure I'm remembering right.  I don't know whether I should stick with what I've known and loved, or if there's something else I should be considering.  Can you bake loaf bread in 7" pizza ovens?  GF dough does not make a big, puffy loaf, only about 4 1/2" height.  I have a gas convection oven at home and find it useful for some applications, but not others.  Never baked in electric. 


I figured I'd get a hobart mixer; a local place rebuilds and sells used.  I'm working with a 12qt in the rental kitchen I'm using now, and it is nowhere near large enough.


I need a bread slicer and used an old Oliver when I was working in the bakery years back.  The Omcan looks about the same and is much less expensive, but I can't find any reviews or commentary about them online.


If anyone has input on these items or other words of wisdom, please share!


Thanks,


Pam


 

kumitedad's picture
kumitedad

I would be interested in the formulas you are using.  The first bakery I worked at tried out Spelt as a gluten free alternative.  Will you have your own space or will you be sharing a bakery space?  I ask because I used to be paranoid about the spelt being contaminated by the other products we made in the bakery. 


How does the bread slice.  I imagine that being gluten free its a tougher slice than regular bread.  That probably means to go as high performance as you can afford.


Let everyone know when it opens.  We all should support our local bakeries


ray

Gluten Free Pam's picture
Gluten Free Pam

Hmm.  My understanding from the GF community is that Spelt is not GF.  I am using other flours and starches (rice, tapioca, potato, corn).  I thought I was going to have to set up my own space, but now may have an option to use a bakery area that a local restaurant is no longer using.  I'll have to get my own mixer and slicer, but the ovens, work tables, pantry, etc will be part of what I rent. 


I think you were right to be paranoid about cross contamination.  As long as there is anything containing gluten being made or used in the same facility, my program will be to sterilize work areas before use, even though they are not the same areas used by the restaurant. 


The bread slices very easily, since there is no gluten to "toughen" things up.  Guar gum and xanthan gum are the most available ingredients to help the dough bind, but certainly do not do the job that gluten does.



Thanks for sharing your thoughts!


Pam

kumitedad's picture
kumitedad

What method are you using for the bread dough.  When I made the Spelt we used a modified sponge method.  I am interested in how you do it.


My boss did not put in the Guar dum or Xanthan gum, which may explain our difficulties with the dough.  I also (in my paranoid mode) made sure to tell customers to ask their doctor on whether the bread was right for them.  Looks like that was a good idea on my part.


 


 

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

While spelt has a lower amount of gluten than other wheat varieties it is NOT gluten free and should be avoided by those with celiac disease.

Gluten Free Pam's picture
Gluten Free Pam

GF bread dough is more like thick cake batter than dough, so traditional bread methods do not apply.  In addition to the batter-type dough, there is no gluten to develop, so multiple rises are not needed.  I've tried multiple rises a few times, just to see if it affected the dough in some other way, but could not see that it did. 


Thanks, flourgirl, for posting very clearly about spelt. I didn't want to sound like a know-it-all about spelt, since I certainly don't know it all, but I have never heard a Celiac talk about incorporating spelt into their diet.  I am very careful about the types of flour used for GF baking as well as the source of the flour, to eliminate cross contamination.