The Fresh Loaf

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wood bread bowl

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c21judyg's picture
c21judyg

wood bread bowl

Hi, I love to bake bread and I have an very old round bread bowl that I used 20 yrs ago.  Its been in storage and I want to use it again but when I washed it, it is very sticky and gummy.  I think that is the oil build up from years that was never cleaned off.  Anyone have any suggestions to getting it back in shape to use again?  I had forgotten that I had it and have started baking bread again now that I am retired. 


Thanks for any help.


Judy

Wisecarver's picture
Wisecarver (not verified)

...It may seem odd but WD40 will do a good job.
What you need to do is breakdown the protiens.
This can also be done with a light oil but it will take more work.
Once you get it clean treat it with a light oil, like the ones for bamboo.

ClimbHi's picture
ClimbHi

WD40 would almost certainly remove the old oily build-up, but would NOT be good for the bowl. There would be no way to ever get it entirely out of the pores of the wood, and it would leach out into whatever is in the bowl -- forever. The formula for WD40 is secret, but they do publish the fact that it does contain refined petroleum oil, which ain't listed as an ingredient in ANY of my recipies. ;-)


ClimbHi
Pittsburgh, PA

Wisecarver's picture
Wisecarver (not verified)

...I've made wooden bowls, most of which are still in service.
I could have mentioned some of the other "penetrants", was just being honest.
You can even find it is still used in medicine, for people, because it will penetrate protein. (Do a search, you may be shocked.)
The idea with wood is to breakdown whatever has attached to it, typically light oils can be used for this as protein on protein.
If whatever you are using on the bowl penetrates the bowl itself there is a concern.
I would first consider the wood itself as most are made from tight closed cell trees.


If this doesn't seems right I'd suggest sticking to a light oil and a scrubbing pad.


btw, consider what we cool the bits with when cutting wooden bowls. ;-)


I am truely sorry this caused such a commotion.

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

You have to use something that is intended for food safety use....kitchen salt works great or greased lightning...the residue will come right off. WD40 is poisonous....c

c21judyg's picture
c21judyg

Thanks for all the replys.  I think the salt sounds like a great suggestion to try first. 

Wisecarver's picture
Wisecarver (not verified)

...You'll be using it as a tool, do not leave WD40 on the bowl.
That is why I mentioned cleaning the bowl with light oil.
WD40 is not approved for this but it is widely used for this method.

cleancarpetman's picture
cleancarpetman

Just a suggestion--  If it were me I would scrub it with a small amount of mild dish soap diluted with warm water not pouring the soap directly into the bowl.  I would thoroughly rinse it and rinse with a dilute of vinegar or lemon juice and water to cut the soap then air dry and use it.  whatever you do keep it food safe.

holds99's picture
holds99

Use fine grit sandpaper and that will remove all the buildup without using chemicals.  You may have to use a number of sheets, as they get gummed if the residue is heavy/thick, but it should work and work safely.


Howard

micki's picture
micki

Judy, do a google search here for "oil for a kneading bowl" written by edh.  He gave me some great help last summer in bringing an old bowl back to life.  I scrubbed mine well with soap and water (well known as a no-no), sanded it and soaked well with mineral oil (the kind you purchase at the drug store).  Enjoy!

ClimbHi's picture
ClimbHi

I do a LOT of woodworking, and here's what I'd do. Scrub it lightly (i.e., little pressure, but as much time as needed) with astainless steel "Scrubbie" and mineral oil. Then wipe it down with cheesecloth. Repeat as needed.


The oil should cut through the old build-up, and it's food safe so there's no problem if some remains. In fact, it's probably good for the bowl and I'd apply some once or twice a year after you get it back to usable condition. You can also use some coarse salt and cheesecloth with the oil instead of the Scrubbie if you want to be more gentle, but you may end up with a bit of saltiness leaching out of the bowl for the first few uses.


ClimbHi
Pittsburgh, PA