The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

high gluten flour

tgw1962_slo's picture
tgw1962_slo

high gluten flour

Hello,


I recently read that using a high-gluten flour (KAF's Sir Lancelot Hi-Gluten, or Giusto's "Ultimate Performer") is better for making pizza crust than an AP or bread flour as it produces a chewier or firmer crust.


Anyone here ever use high-gluten flour for pizza crust? What was your experience? Did you like it more or less than using AP or Bread flour?  


I also understand that High-gluten absorbs more moisture, so you supposedly need to add a small amount more of water than if you used AP or bread flour? 


 


If you could let me know, I'd appreciate hearing from you. Thanks.


 


Tory 

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

hi gluten flout is the way to go if you realy like thin crust pizza


once the dough is conditioned you can get it paper thin without tearing it  and it will bake crispy


hi gluten flour is also used for strudel dough and you know how thin that is

tgw1962_slo's picture
tgw1962_slo

Hello,


Ok, now I'm really confused. I got the impression that if I wanted thin crust pizza, I'd be better off to use a low-gluten flour (KAF "Italian" style is 8.5%). And they indicated to me that a low gluten flour is what I should use for thin crust.


And that if I wanted a thicker "chewier" crust, High Gluten would be what I should use.


 


Tory

makingbaking's picture
makingbaking

I like to go Caputo 00 for your pizza dough if you like the neopolitan / roman thin pizza variety. 


I'd go high gluten if you want NYC style thin


My fave is the Caputo - order it online at Surfas


Lemme know what you think


 


 

ema2two's picture
ema2two

Norm


Pardon my ignorance (at least it's curable--I just keep asking questions)


What do you mean by "once the dough is conditioned . . ."?


I read about dough conditioners (additives to dough that often include lecithin, milk, vitamin C) and also noticed something on the KA site called "dough relaxer" that they recommend for pizza dough.  Not sure what's in a dough relaxer.


Thanks for always sharing so much of your baker's knowledge and experience (and good laughs with that Wierd Al Yankovich clip).