The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Newbie question

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greg.re1234's picture
greg.re1234

Newbie question

At first, I am sorry for my bad English.


I have seen the videos on this site and have no idea why the bread shown there is puffy, but the dough is so "hard"(i mean not liquid-like) that it can be easily cut into dry pieces. If I will do such dough, the baked bread would be ideal for glue.Usually I bake at 200-240 degrees(Celsium).


Gregory.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Welcome to the site!  Tell us more about your bread and in what country do you live?


Mini

greg.re1234's picture
greg.re1234

Thank you! I'm from Ukraine. Eastern Europe.


I took this recipe


http://www.elise.com/recipes/archives/004274georges_light_rye_bread.php


I had no molasses, so the brad had more light colour than at the photos.


Actually I want to make the bread as shown at the videos. But if I make the dough, that can be cutted as at


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/2461/video-tutorial-shaping-sandwich-loaf


,i'll get the gluish bread.


To make a puffy bread I have to make the dough, which is very soft and does not keep the shape i want. The bread cames out flat, 30 sentimeters in diameter and 5 sentim. high in center.


 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Differences in flour could be making the differences, try holding just a little water back and mix in only when needed. 


Holding shape has a lot to do with gluten structure in the dough and letting the dough rise.  If the dough is soft, you might need a form to hold the shape.  Folding the dough and letting it rest for 30 minutes and then folding again, helps to build gluten structure in soft bread dough.  This can be done 3 or more times before shaping into loaf to bake.  Do let it rise before putting into the oven.  There is also a danger in letting it rise too long before baking and it will really come out flat!


A stiffer dough needs more time to rise.  Rising is important for a fluffy bread.  So either put soft dough in a form or let a stiffer dough rise longer.  A lot depends on the room temperature.  A cold dough will also take longer to rise.  In winter it can sometimes be hard to find a warm place to let the dough rise.


Do you normally use a soft liquid dough for bread?


Is that what you wanted to know? 


Mini

greg.re1234's picture
greg.re1234

First I'll try other flour.


Then, I'll use a form... Hmm... Sounds good. Thank you.


Offtopic. It's pretty cold indeed.

Manyfeathers's picture
Manyfeathers

Hi! 


I've been making bread at home without a machine for several years now.  Prefer multigrain and flying by the seat of my pants.


If my loaf of everything but the kitchen sink didn't rise very well, can I work in some sugar, re-knead and expect some good results?


I left it in the loaf pan overnight, but it didn't grow any taller.


I suspect the sea salt was too much, 1 tsp to 2 3/4 dry flours.


Help!

arzajac's picture
arzajac

Did it rise before you put it into the loaf pan?  WHat are you putting in the bread?


Also, I probably use 1 tsp of salt per two cups of flour, so I don't think you are using too much salt.  A lot of salt will slow down the yeast, but not stop it completly, unless you use a cup of salt or something...


 

Manyfeathers's picture
Manyfeathers

I put in a cup of white flour, a cup of graham wheat flour, 1/4 cup or so of rye flour and a 1/4 cup or so of oatbran.


A tablespoon of gluten, 1/4 cup of molasses/cane syrup, a teasp sea salt, about 1 1/2 teasp quick yeast, 2 tablesp powdered milk, a cup of warm water, 2 tablesp butter.


It rose the first time, but not much, maybe just under double.


I was thinking of feeding it some sugar?

Manyfeathers's picture
Manyfeathers

Oh yes and 2 tablesp of milled flax seed and 2 tablesp of flax seed whole.

Manyfeathers's picture
Manyfeathers

Can you rework the dough?  Feed it something to improve it?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Give it some more water and white flour, and a little salt.  try mixing it up first into a dough and then sandwich the two together and knead.  There should be enough yeast already to work.  Try not to let the dough get too stiff.   Try using 1 1/2 c flour and slowly add 3/4 cup water, a acant teaspoon of salt.  Once the two doughs are mixed well, let rest about an hour, then shape and let rise, bake.


Mini

Manyfeathers's picture
Manyfeathers

Thank you so much!  I'll give it a try.  :)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Did you notice little holes or cracks on the surface of the dough where maybe the gasses were escaping instead of raising the dough?


Mini