The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Slow Rising Bread

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purpurea's picture
purpurea

Slow Rising Bread

Hello


 


I am a complete beginner in the sourdough world. I am a low budget mamma and can't really buy a established starter; moreover, The Netherlands is a rather difficult place to get nice flours (can you imagine they don't sell WWFlour in the supermarket?!?!?!). Therefore, i started my own, with the instructions of Mike Avery in his site sourdough home, 2 weeks ago. Started feeding it every 8 hours, on a basis of Rye and WW, and from the beginning it always smelt so good. So far it has been bubbly and happy, and after the first week I switched to feeds every 12 hours with rye and AP Flour. It started to double its volume by then. With all these signals of health I decided to jump in the pond. I took a recipe of Pain de Mie I found in the Sourdough Companion site, because it seemed easy. It prompted to make a sponge with 1 T of starter (I used 3, though, just to "give more power") and 100gr flour and 100gr water. I left it overnight, and this morning it had bulked considerably. I proceeded to mix the dough ingredients, amongst which there is milk and butter, I kneaded 3 times with intervals of 5 min, 5 min each kneading, then fermented for 3 hours with a fold each hour, until it seemed to have doubled even though I had my doubts. Here things started to seem slow, since in the recipe it said that it would take 2 hrs the first rise. I punched down and shaped in a tin the half and the other in a "log". It's been 3 1/2 hrs and my loaves seem to be so slow...! They haven't doubled so far, and I am wondering if this is normal. Is there anything I might be doing wrong?? I am patient, but I wonder about the average rates of rising for sourdough. I hope anyone can help me with some answers.


 


Grateful in advance,


P

gaaarp's picture
gaaarp

P-, patience is a virtue, especially when it comes to sourdough, which rises more slowly than commercial yeast.  But don't be too patient.  You don't necessarily want to wait for your formed loaves to double.  If they do, you may not get much oven spring.  The poke test seems to be the best way to tell when your loaves are properly proofed.  Poke the loaf with your finger.  If the indentation fills back in slowly, your loaves are properly proofed.  If the dough springs back immediately, give it more time.  If the indentation remains, you've overproofed.


A lot of sourdough bakers like to retard their loaves overnight (some even for a few days) in the refrigerator before baking.  This allows a nice, long, slow proof and gives the bread more flavor.

purpurea's picture
purpurea

Thank you for your response, gaaarp. I decided to bake them little after I wrote the first post. They turned out very good! In the oven they sprang beautifully and the taste was oh-so-delicious. For my first loaves I think I made a good job, eventhough there are many things to learn yet! I took a picture of the crumb but when I was about to post it, the cam ran out of batteries...:-(


Thanks, anyway!

purpurea's picture
purpurea

Recharged batteries...never before have posted a pic of my bread. I guess I've never been proud enough.


 


Crumb of my first sourdough loaf


 


Crumb Pain de Mie