The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Newbie baker

m2scq's picture
m2scq

Newbie baker

Greetings from my kitchen...

To begin with, I am fascinated with the rich information this site has.  I know it seems overwhelming to process the information that can be had, but, as with good bread, I'm trying to take my time to digest the topics one by one. 

I cook and bake, but bread-making was something that I did not think I would venture into...that was until I got a homesick craving for a bread that was a staple at the breakfast table as I was growing up - the pan de sal (pandesal.)  I could not find a decent pandesal from our area.  Most of the pandesal copycats did not have the crusty exterior and chewy interior I fondly remember.  Hence, I took it upon myself to research how to make them for myself and my family.  While I have not perfected the recipe, I have been able to produce decent looking and tasting ones.  I hope this site will help me in my quest to do that. 

I resolve to make this year the year I devote to improving my bread-making.  Aside from pandesal, I hope to make a decent sourdough bread. 

Cheers,

m2scq

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, m2scq.

Welcome to TFL!

You will certainly find lots of good information here on sourdough baking. Some TFL members also have their own blogs or web sits devoted to bread baking.

I'm not familiar with pan de sal (Salt Bread?). Please tell us more about it.

David

m2scq's picture
m2scq

Thank you.

Pan de Sal has its origins from Spain and you are correct in it being Salt Bread (literal translation is Bread of Salt.)  I think its ancestor is the Bolillo.  Pan de Sal are shaped as rolls and are rolled in breadcrumbs.  The exterior of the bread is crusty and the interior is soft.  Though it is named bread of salt, it is sweeter than it is salty.