The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Newbie baker

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m2scq's picture
m2scq

Newbie baker

Greetings from my kitchen...


To begin with, I am fascinated with the rich information this site has.  I know it seems overwhelming to process the information that can be had, but, as with good bread, I'm trying to take my time to digest the topics one by one. 


I cook and bake, but bread-making was something that I did not think I would venture into...that was until I got a homesick craving for a bread that was a staple at the breakfast table as I was growing up - the pan de sal (pandesal.)  I could not find a decent pandesal from our area.  Most of the pandesal copycats did not have the crusty exterior and chewy interior I fondly remember.  Hence, I took it upon myself to research how to make them for myself and my family.  While I have not perfected the recipe, I have been able to produce decent looking and tasting ones.  I hope this site will help me in my quest to do that. 


I resolve to make this year the year I devote to improving my bread-making.  Aside from pandesal, I hope to make a decent sourdough bread. 


Cheers,


m2scq

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, m2scq.


Welcome to TFL!


You will certainly find lots of good information here on sourdough baking. Some TFL members also have their own blogs or web sits devoted to bread baking.


I'm not familiar with pan de sal (Salt Bread?). Please tell us more about it.


David

m2scq's picture
m2scq

Thank you.


Pan de Sal has its origins from Spain and you are correct in it being Salt Bread (literal translation is Bread of Salt.)  I think its ancestor is the Bolillo.  Pan de Sal are shaped as rolls and are rolled in breadcrumbs.  The exterior of the bread is crusty and the interior is soft.  Though it is named bread of salt, it is sweeter than it is salty. 


 

Don Bigote's picture
Don Bigote

An aunt and two cousins of mine each engage in bakery business.. and my girlfriend's family used to run a panaderia. They all mainly produced pandesal, baked in big wood-fired brick ovens.


I bake my pandesal in a broiler oven the size of a microwave.. yet, according to my aunt, it's texture is closer to the old-style Spanish friars' pandesal than the buns made by her traditionally apprenticed panaderos from Batangas.


What works for me is using bread flour for higher gluten content, 60% hydration, 10% oil/butter/shortening, kneading the dough a little extra to fully develop the gluten, 10 minutes rest, divide, roll, a single rise to about 3x the volume (2 hours).. then steaming the pre-heated oven before putting in the risen dough.  I hope there's something here that might help you get the authentic pandesal texture you want.


 

m2scq's picture
m2scq

I'll give this a try.  I knead for about five to ten minutes and then cover and rise.  I punch down, divide, and let rest for second rising.  I'll post again when I get the chance to make this.  


By any chance to do you have a recipe for monay?


Thanks again.

Don Bigote's picture
Don Bigote

Kneading time may vary depending on the flour, hydration, temperature, manual or mechanical, etc.  I normally use a bread machine to mix and knead and it took me quite a number of trials and errors before I got to what works for me.  Anything less than 10 minutes of kneading often got me some buns that puffed up during oven spring then somewhat deflate.  When I increased knead time to 15 minutes, the buns inflated nicely and kept their domes throughout.


Whether to go single or multiple rise, really depends on the yeast used.  I use instant yeast mainly because its what's available around here - it gives only enough for a good first rise.  With better acting yeast, I guess I'd be punching down and doing a second rise.


Anyway.. you might find this useful too..


http://breadmaking.googlepages.com/howtomakepandesal


 


As for the monay recipe.. you may want to try these..


http://breadmaking.googlepages.com/hardmonay


http://www.recipezaar.com/Hard-and-Soft-Monay-192841


http://www.recipezaar.com/Monay-Putok-193232

m2scq's picture
m2scq

Thanks for the links.  I do my pan de sal pretty much the same way except I don't use egg, and use oil instead of butter (I assume that since butter is more expensive than oil, panaderias would not be utilizing them to produce the rolls.)  I am going to give the monay a try.


Here's my pan de sal with homemade cheese (quesong puti.)  Personally, I leave my rolls in for a few more minutes as I want them darker. My kids, however, want them lighter.