The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

First "Italian Loaf"

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joem6112's picture
joem6112

First "Italian Loaf"


I usually make bread in a square loaf pan because when I attempted a free form long loaf the dough rose but spread out which made for a wide short almost flat loaf. Expecting coal in my sock, I was pleasantly surprised when  Santa brought me an Italian bread loaf pan. Pictured here is my first attempt. I may never go back to being “square”.


SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

A great start to the New Year ahead!!


Sylvia

benjamin's picture
benjamin

I saw those pans in the store today... how was the loaf, was it crustier than usual?


regards


ben

joem6112's picture
joem6112

Yes! and remained crusty. My square loafs would come out of oven crusty but soften after cooling. The dark brown crust I discovered is caused by the use of honey in teh dough rather than sugar.

MommaT's picture
MommaT

Hi,


I have one of these pans and most frequently use it with my cloth as a type of couche for long loaves.  I haven't ventured to use it for baking (its real function).


You seem to have done well with this so I have a couple questions....




  • When do you move the dough into the pan?  Do you proof in the pan or move it in after proofing?

  • If you move the dough after proofing, do you pre-heat the pan with your oven?  Or does the dough go in at room temperature?



Thanks!


MommaT

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Perforated baking pans can be used to proof in but I have had the dough stick to the surface from the holes allowing the dough to squeeze through. The professional grade variety has smaller holes and the dough won't fill the holes.


I use my baguette pan when I want to bake on both shelves on occasion. Usually I proof on a couche ( floured linnen) then place the dough on the pan, cold. The pans deliver a nice crust all around.


Eric

joem6112's picture
joem6112

Try usng a baking spray on the pan. It works for me.

joem6112's picture
joem6112

I proof the dough in the pan after I have sprayed it with a baking spray. I place the pan and dough in an unheated oven with a container of hot water to botn warm the space and keep the air moist. After proofing I remove the dough in pan and preheat the oven. This causes the surface of the dough to dry  a bit making slashing difficult. I haven't had much luck moving a proofed dough to the pan. Clumsy, I guess (lazy too)

Klutzy's picture
Klutzy

I plan on proofing the loaf in the pan on parchment and then removing it, preheating the pan, and sliding it paper and all back onto the hot pan. Hoping this will be a good substitute for a baking stone. I'm glad to know you like your pan. Your loaf is gorgeous! I found a used 4-loaf professional version at a restaurant supply shop for $3, then discovered it's too big for my oven! So I will hacksaw it in half, fingers crossed that it holds together (the whole thing is held together by a horizontal band that the pans are riveted to).

joem6112's picture
joem6112

After sawing, file the rough edges or use emery paper to remove burrs. Sawing can leave dangerously sharp edges. GOOD LUCK (and baking)