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ladyloree's picture
ladyloree

Loaves Loaves

I have been baking some loaves were good others not so good. I am getting better at temperture and prep.  I am having trouble with the oven spring. I have an electric oven.  I am so use to working with a gas stove and gauging temp with this oven is driving me crazy.  It starts out ok then when the element turns off my loaf suffers.  Any suggestions would be totally gratful.  Also I made a Challah bread, my mother says that its a difficult bread to make I had no problem doing that. I am not Jewish but love alot of there foods and breads. What I have a problem with is the simple recipe of white bread either its to hard or too crumbly or not white enough for me. My husband doesn't complain he eats it and there is leftover I give it to the birds. Living in virginia theres birds all over they benefit from my not so good loaves.


Well anyway just thought I check in and check the net world.


Thanks for all your help


Loree


 

crunchy's picture
crunchy

Loree, I also have an electric oven, but have no problems with it. As far as I know, electric ovens are superior to gas ovens because they maintain temperature better. What may be causing problems, though, is that the oven temp is not what the dial says it is. I have a cheap oven thermometer (http://tinyurl.com/a89rax) in mine to help me see what the real temp is. Believe it or not, my old oven was 50 degrees off!


To get the best oven spring the bread needs a steamy oven. Do you use any sort of steam? If not, give it a shot, it may make all the difference.


Hope this helps.

ladyloree's picture
ladyloree

Thanks Crunchy


I never consider the dial was off will invest in thermometer. I use no steam. Do i just fill a tray with warm water and  put it on the bottom rack?  Insight please....

crunchy's picture
crunchy

I use an old cookie sheet that I put in the oven during preheating. Then, after putting the loaf in, I pour a cup of water on the now hot sheet. Others use an old cast-iron skillet and ice-cubes, yet others use a spray bottle. If you search for "steam" on TFL, I'm sure you'll get a load of methods.

fairfieldbread's picture
fairfieldbread

This is more of a gee whiz question - but the people cooking with brick ovens or wood fired ovens.....how do they steam their bread?


thanks


Andy

crunchy's picture
crunchy

Andy, some people do and others advise strongly against it. See here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/1920/mud-brick-ovens-and-steam .

fairfieldbread's picture
fairfieldbread

This is the coolest website I've found in a while - thanks:)

ClimbHi's picture
ClimbHi

Wood-fired oven here. Mopping the deck with a damp towel starts the process. A shot with a garden sprayer on fine mist just after, and 30 seconds after, loading finishes it. Also, baking a full load helps keep the humidity high -- I generally open the door a bit for the last 7 - 10 minutes to let things crisp up a bit.


ClimbHi
Pittsburgh, PA


Edit: Note that the towel is damp, not wet, and the spray is very fine, so the bricks never really get wet. If they do, damage can occur over time due to rapid temp cycling. More is not better in this case!

fairfieldbread's picture
fairfieldbread

I've heard the moisture from a full load would nearly do it......how big is your oven? are you commercial?


thanks!
Andy