The Fresh Loaf

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Sweet Potato Pugliese Bread

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breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Sweet Potato Pugliese Bread

Hey everbody,


This is my first posting here on this forum.  I'd like to share this recipe that I have been working on for the past week or so...  Lemme know what you all think, and let me know how it works out for you.  Thanks.


Tim



Sweet Potato Pugliese Bread


This is an 85% hydration dough.  Crumb is very light, airy, and moist...


Makes two approx. 500g loaves.


Time Required: 5-6 hours with 30 minutes active work.

Ingredients:
400g all purpose unbleached flour (70%)
100g bread flour (17%)
60g whole wheat flour (10%)
20g rye flour (3%)
493 grams of water (85%)
14g kosher salt (2.5%)
1 tsp active dry yeast (1%)
125g mashed sweet potato (see instructions) (22%)

Tools required:
Large mixing bowl with cover, or plastic wrap
Wooden spoon
Kitchen Scale
Baking Stone
Peel
Tea towels, or linen baker’s couches
Small pot
Immersion blender


1. Peel sweet potato and cut into small chunks and measure out 125g.  Place sweet potato in small pot with just enough water to cover.  Bring water to boil and cook sweet potato until it can be mashed easily with a fork.


2. When sweet potato is cooked, remove from heat and separate sweet potato from cooking liquid.


3. Using a kitchen scale, add the sweet potato cooking liquid, and add room temperature water to make 493g of total liquid.


4. Add cooked sweet potato to the liquid and process with stick blender until there are no chunks of sweet potato.  Make sure the liquid mixture is less than 100 degrees Fahrenheit.


5. Using a kitchen scale, measure out dry ingredients (flours, salt, yeast), place in large bowl and mix well with wooden spoon, then add sweet potato liquid mixture, and mix into choppy dough, and let rest covered for about 20-30 minutes (autolyse)


6. After rest, mix dough again with wooden spoon until dough becomes smooth and wraps around wooden spoon.  Turn dough out onto heavily floured work surface, and turn dough using the fold and stretch method, returning dough to covered bowl between turns.  Repeat at 20 minute intervals 4 times.  At last turn, let dough rise in covered bowl undisturbed for another 90 minutes.


7. After final rise, turn dough out onto heavily floured work surface, gently stretch and fold dough into thirds with the last fold overlapping the first and divide into two loaves. (approx 630g). 


8. Form loaves by gently stretching them out and folding them in thirds with the last fold overlapping the first, and place seam side down on heavily floured tea towels or linen baker’s couch with a wall between the 2 loaves.  Be careful not to handle to dough to much to preserve the air pockets.  Be sure to flour the loaves well so they don’t stick to the tea towels or couche.  Cover with remaining couch or tea towels and let proof for about 45 minutes or until they are well expanded and barely spring back when touched.


9. Place baking stone on middle rack of oven and turn on to 500 degrees Fahrenheit and preheat for at least 45 minutes.


10. Turn loaves onto peel (seam side up) and place directly on to the baking stone.  Turn oven temperature down to 450 degrees Fahrenheit, and bake for 40-45 minutes turning them 180 degrees half way into baking time.  Loaves are done when they are a deep golden brown and the internal temperature is between 205F to 210F.


11. Let loaves cool completely before cutting and eating.






Floydm's picture
Floydm

Sounds good.  How'd it turn out for you?  You happy with the results?

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

The turned out great.  This is the 2nd time I have tried this recipe this week, just to see if it would turn out as the 1st time, which was great also...  This is the lightest bread that I have ever baked...


I just changed photo hosting sites, so hopefully the pictures show up...  Lemme know if you can see them...

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Yes, I'm seeing them now.  Beautiful. 


Would you mind if I feature this up on the front page?  I've got two of David's posts up there right now.  David's stuff is always beautiful to look at, but it is fun to feature different people's recipes.

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Sure, absolutely!  Thanks.

RFMonaco's picture
RFMonaco

Can you taste the sweet potato or just dough? Thanks.

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Maybe there's a very slight hint of sweet potato, but not really.  It does turn the dough very slightly orange.  I think it has more of an effect on the texture than the taste...

almoguy's picture
almoguy

The sweet potato has a unique property in that it contains an enzyme that converts the sweet potato's high starch content into a sugar called maltose which is about a third less sweet than table sugar.* This natural sugar would certainly provide an "eat fest" for the yeast, thus producing more carbon dioxide, thus producing the impressive crumb that this bread has. I found when I made this bread that the dough at first was quite sweet, but that sweetness disappeared as the gluten was developed and the yeast did its thing (I always envision "Pac-Man" gobbling when I think of yeast activity) When the loaves fully cooled, the flavor was surprisingly neutral, lacking in the complex flavors of loaves using a biga or poolish. However this is nit picking and this recipe produces a great product... perfect for dipping into world class olive oil (which Puglia is renowned for.) This formula is a great addition to the home bakers arsenal.


* Info from Harold Mcgee's "On Food and Cooking"

Barkalounger's picture
Barkalounger

Sounds delicious.  I love sweet potatoes -- even the mushy stuff covered in mini marshmallows.  I think I'll try this recipe tomorrrow.  Thanks!


 


Tim

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

I especially love sweet potatoes with pineapple and those mini marshmallows...


Lemme know how yours turns out.  I'm very curious...


Also, this recipe does not include any preferments so it is a very clean and light tasting bread...  I'm sure you can convert this recipe to use a pre-ferment, but I like it as I have made it...

Wisecarver's picture
Wisecarver (not verified)

...Awesome recipe.
I called my kids in here to look at those images and they gasped.
Told them they have no idea how delicious this would be. ;-)

I'm an Espresso addict and this recipe would be perfect with Espresso. Mmmm
  All the best,
   Mark

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Thanks.  Lemme know when you try it out...


Tim

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

Those loaves are beautiful, crust and crumb! Thanks for sharing. Looking forward to seeing more of your work!


Betty

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I love their rustic look and the flavor sounds wonderful.


Sylvia

Barkalounger's picture
Barkalounger

My plan was to follow this recipe to the letter.  It didn't quite work out that way -- I overcooked the sweet potatoes, which meant there was more liquid, with meant more flour -- but I'm still very happy with the outcome.  It really is a light, flavorfull, good-looking bread.  Thanks for sharing it.

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

You are very welcome.  I'm glad it worked out for you reasonably well.  You should post pic of your version.

almoguy's picture
almoguy

Tim:


I tried out your recipe today (with some variation due to 20 years of bread baking... sort of like food jazz...playing with the notes) Very impressive. The loaves have phenomenal texture both inside and out. My trial loaves have been out of the oven for about an hour, are still a wee bit warm, so the true taste has not fully developed, however what I am tasting is big league. I just returned from Puglia and there is nothing like this in the Bakeries there... It is closer to the bread typical of Rome. I am curious how you went about developing this recipe. The sweet potato is a brilliant discovery. Bravo!!!!!


Paul 

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Paul,


Thanks so much for trying out my recipe, and I'm glad yours turned out well...  I've actually been baking bread for about 16 years myself, so it's natural to experiment and stuff...


Basically I have 2 books, the BBA, and Artisan Baking Across America...  My recipe is based on the Pugliese from the BBA, and the Tortano from Royal Crown Bakery in the Artisan Baking Across America book...  I had a sweet potato lying around, and a general idea about the hydration level because I was baking a lot of ciabatte at the time, so I made up this recipe...  I was as surprised as you were about how well this recipe worked...  I am always worried when writing recipes and how they work for other people because everybody has their own way of doing things...


Thanks again for trying it out...  Please post some pics of your version if there's any left and feel free to pass on this recipe...


Tim

almoguy's picture
almoguy

Tim:


These loaves turned out so well that I actually photographed them. However I am such a Ludite I will need help posting the photos.


I want to encourage everybody on this site to try Tim's recipe verbatim. His instructions are extremely accurate and easy. These hight hydration doughs are a little intimidating at first (brings a whole new meaning to gluttonous mass) but as you sequence through the stretch and fold technique (easy), the glutton development will start to make the dough much more manageable and so much fun. Your family and friends will bow down to honor your efforts.


Dancing welcomed! 


Paul

Noel Linback's picture
Noel Linback

Well, been lurking for a while and have been wanting to try this since I saw it a few weeks ago.  I had a few mishaps along the way but the final product was delicious. 


  A few changes I had to make:


  -Substituted chapti flour for whole wheat flour when I found I had none on hand, I figured it was about the closest thing


  -After mixing everything I put the dough coverered into the refridgerator for about 12 hours, I hadn't intended on this but I had to make a surprise trip to the emergency room..


So this morning I pulled the dough out, let it come up to room temp and proceded to follow the directions from the first folding on.  It worked out ok but I had a difficult time working the dough, this is the first dough I've made with hydration this high, I found my self using a lot of flour to keep the dough workable, don't know if anyone has any tips for easier working with wet doughs.. So.. here is the final product:


Sweet Potato Pugliese


Sweet Potato Pugliese


 

silentspoon's picture
silentspoon

Reply to Noel -


Your bread looks great. 


Yes, you can see by the crumb comparison that you probably worked some additional flour into the dough while handling it.  I think the most important thing that stands out in the OP's recipe is the high hydration.  85%!  Knowing that, you should take extra effort not to take away from that hydration by adding flour while working. 


To manage high hydration dough, I use dripping wet hands.  Occasionally putting my hands back under the tap water as necessary.  More water isn't going to alter this crumb much, but less water can.


Here's a great post with tips on handling wet dough:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/lessons/tentips_7_wet

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Noel,


Your bread looks great!  Especially for a first try.  This bread gets easier the more often you make it.  Wet doughs are tough to handle, but once you get the hang of it, it's a lot of fun!  Work with wet hands, and work quickly!


Tim

alliezk's picture
alliezk

I need to try this as soon as I go buy a kitchen scale. Hopefully sometime in the next week or so, it looks wonderful.


Have you made any changes on the recipe since this post?

dollhead's picture
dollhead

Your bread looks wonderful!  I've got to try this!