The Fresh Loaf

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Przytulanka's picture
Przytulanka

Pear bread


I have never been a big fan of pears. I eat only a few per year. But when I saw those I decided to buy a few. They were delicious. Their beauty inspired me to bake this bread.



Soaker:
453 g water


283g whole rye flour-stone ground
453 whole wheat flour

 Mix the flours and water until the dough comes together and you have a sticky mass and put the container in the refrigerator for 12 hours 
Starter:
125 g water
125 g whole rye flour
25 g whole rye starter


Final dough:
all soaker from refrigerator
255 g starter
Mix the ingredients (it's not easy) and let rest 30 minutes.
Add salt work it through the dough. Let rest 30 minutes. Fold the dough and let rest 30 minutes. Repeat the procedure once more.
Allow the dough to ferment for 4 hours at room temperature.

Shaping:


Flatten the dough into a disc, put 100 g of pistachio nuts (toasted, salted) and pear cut in to pieces. Fold in each side, and then the bottom. . Turn the dough over and shape your pear. Try to shape thick neck to prevent from burning during baking. Use XL raisin or dried plum to make stem end of the pear. Place the pear on peel with parchment . Cover with plastic to avoid drying the dough.

After 3-hour proofing preheat the oven to 500F with a.baking stone. Prepare 1 cup of  hot water for steaming.Score the loaf.
Bake:
15 minutes-480 F
15 minutes -450F
Remove  the parchment, cover the bread with foil (it's brown enough) and bake 10 minutes in 400F.


 Adapted from the recipe from: Discovering Sourdough and inspired by http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2010/01/31/pear-buckwheat-bread/

 

hilo_kawika's picture
hilo_kawika

Citric acid as a preservative

I really have enjoyed baking ~ 3# size loaves of pane integrale (25% whole wheat, 75% bread flour, 70% hydration) using a pre-ferment that uses ~ half of the total amount of flour used.  But I've been having issues with the bread molding before I and friends could finish it.  Having read so much in TFL about sourdough breads that have longer keeping qualities but also having found the whole sourdough thing to be too much work for my personal bread baking style, I decided to do a small experiment.  I began adding food quality citric acid to the loaves I bake in increasing quantities until I reached a point at which the bread keeping quality was extended to 5-6 days but I still couldn't detect the flavor of the citric acid.  For me this was using 1/4 tsp of citric acid in a 3# loaf.  The citric acid is added to the dry ingredients (along with fine-grained salt) during the second day just before adding the water, yeast and pre-ferment.


If anyone wishes, I will post the complete recipe.


aloha,


Dave Hurd, Hilo, Hawaii

BNLeuck's picture
BNLeuck

Procrastinator's Sandwich Bread: Take 2

 


 


Procrastinator's Sandwich Bread: Take 2


Continued from Procrastinator's Sandwich Bread.


So, while I was impressed with the taste and texture of the previous PSB, I still don't like the idea of all white bread. I grew up on white bread; my mother bought sandwich loaves from the grocery store like most busy moms, especially since she had little talent in yeasted baking, and my grandfather's specialty was potato bread. And while tasty, and surely better than the store-bought loaves, it still wasn't any paragon of nutrition. It took me a long time to like the taste of whole grains, but now I seemed to have flipped the other way... I don't really like white bread. I'll tolerate it, but I prefer whole grain.


And to make it even more difficult, I don't really like wheat -- at least, by itself. I find it bitter, and frankly, I don't do bitter. But I love rye, and barley, and corn, and oats, and... well, you get the picture. I actually really like white wheat, because of its less-bitter taste, but it's much harder to find for a good price. Red wheat is plentiful and cheap, so I just find it easier to mix it with other grains, or sweeten it, etc. Even white wheat has a bold flavor, though. You notice it right away. This isn't a bad thing, but it isn't what I wanted in this bread. I wanted subtle, behind-the-scenes flavor. The kind that makes you go, "Hmm, what is this? This is different. This is good."


So I chose barley. Mild, slightly sweet, and a perfect backdrop for the flax already in the recipe. This time, I chose to use only 1 cup of barley flour and 4 cups of bread flour. I need to know the threshold of the bread, when it goes from just enough whole grains to too much. I intend to gradually step up the amount of barley flour I use until I find it negatively affects the texture, flavor, and/or ease of use of the bread. I don't want to have to coddle this bread because it has whole grains. If I have to coddle it, I won't make it regularly. And that sort of defeats the purpose, doesn't it?


I show the recipe below for one loaf, though I doubled it this time around and made two loaves. Honestly, this dough is so easy to handle even by hand, I would make massive batches at once, but I only have one oven and two loaf pans. I'm sure if you scaled this out and made a baker's dozen it wouldn't be much more work than it is for one. I scaled back the yeast some this time, to see if it still rose quickly -- I noted little difference in rise times but a big difference in taste. Also, I used half buttermilk, half 1% milk this time around, and sprinkled with barley flakes instead of the 7-grain cereal. Very tasty! Though the barley flakes like to fall off some...


Procrastinator's Sandwich Bread: Barley Edition


 



  • .25c butter

  • 1c 1% milk

  • 1c reduced fat buttermilk

  • 2tbsp granulated sugar

  • 2tsp kosher salt

  • 4c bread flour

  • 1c barley flour

  • 1tbsp instant yeast

  • 2tbsp vital wheat gluten

  • 2tbsp ground flax seed

  • more milk for brushing

  • 1-2tbsp barley flakes (or topping of choice)


 


 



  1. Melt butter in microwave in a large measuring cup or bowl. (1 min on HIGH for me.)

  2. Add milk and heat to lukewarm. (1 more min on HIGH for me.)

  3. Add sugar and salt and stir to dissolve.

  4. Combine flours, yeast, gluten, and flax in a large bowl/the bowl of a stand mixer.

  5. Add liquid and mix to "shaggy mass" stage.

  6. Knead by hand or mixer until elastic. Dough will NOT clean bowl or form a ball; this is fine.

  7. Let rise until double, about 35 mins.

  8. Shape into a loaf, and put in greased 9x5in pan.

  9. Preheat oven to 350F; let dough rise 25-30 mins.

  10. Brush with milk and sprinkle barley flakes on top, then score loaf as desired. (I always do mine diagonally, corner to corner.)

  11. Bake for 25 mins uncovered, with steam, then cover with foil and bake another 20-35 mins, until internal temp is 190F.


Pictures to come tomorrow, when I un-lazy enough to upload them to my computer. LOL

 


 


 

BellesAZ's picture
BellesAZ

Pane Siciliano - BBA interpretation

On Saturday, I began making Peter Reinhart's Pane Siciliano formula from the Bread Bakers Apprentice.  When I first started it, I thought it was a 2 day bread build.. lol.  Needless to say I had to pitch something else real quick for Sunday dinner - thanks Jason's Ciabatta!  Nope, this dough takes a full three days, but I have to say.. it was absolutely worth it.


The direction and assistance in the book is so well written that it made it easy to follow along.  I just love how this book really guides you through every step.  I started with his Pate Fementee and on day 2, I was able to add the remaining formula ingredients, including 1 TBS of honey.  Yesterday afternoon, I was able to shape the dough and the only big mistake I made was to try and shape this dough on a lightly floured surface.  This made shaping the dough into 24 inch ropes a bit tricky, but with a 10 minute rest, they ended up rolling out just fine.  What I didn't realize is that with that slight amount of flour adhered to the dough, my shape didn't stay tight.  Lesson learned.  During the rise and oven spring, they came a bit loose. 


This "S" Shaped bread is beautiful though.  The smell from the oven, after three days of building flavor, was incredible.  The bread was so creamy with a slight bit of sweetness from the honey that actually enhanced the flavor, not really made it sweet at all.  The color of the crust is a beautiful bronze - thanks to the semolina flour.  Seriously, this just melts on the tongue and is well worth the three days.


If anyone else has made this, I'd love to hear what you think.



veeanoo's picture
veeanoo

Zucchini Bread

Hi...can anyone please give me a recipe for zucchini bread..but not the sweet version....I would like a savory version....thanks

amolitor's picture
amolitor

Oatmeal bread -

 


My wife likes oatmeal and things made with oatmeal, so she requested a bread made with oatmeal. This is the result:


bouillie



  • 1/4 cup oatmeal (would have used more, but that's all we had)

  • 1/4 Bob's Red Mill 7 grain hot cereal

  • 1/4 cup barley flour

  • 1 cup boiling water


Mix, let stand overnight, covered.


poolish



  • 1/8 tsp rapid rise yeast (it's what we have -- I'd prefer 1/4 tsp regular dried yeast)

  • 1 cup bread flour

  • 1 cup warm water


Proof yeast in water, mix in flour thoroughly. Let stand overnight, covered.


In the morning:


Proof 1/8 tsp yeast (rapid rise, I'd use 1/4 tsp dried yeast if I had it) in about 2 T warm water.


Sprinkle 1 T salt on the bouillie (I will use 2 tsp next time, see notes below) and mix, then add poolish and yeast mixture above to bouillie and mix. Mix in flour until it looks like the right hydration (I was aiming for 66 percent or thereabouts -- but see notes below!). I was assuming this would come out to 1 1/2 cups or so, but it was somewhat less, perhaps 3/4 cup, before things started to look like the sort of moist dough I wanted. Autolyse thirty minutes, then knead for moderate dough development. During kneading, something began to give water back -- the dough rapidly turned into a very moist dough, and felt like 70 to 75 percent hydration. I kneaded it wet for a time, just to see what would happen (if something suddenly gace BACK a bunch of water, I didn't want to panic, add a bunch more flour, and then have whatever it was suck the water up again!). I wound up adding 1/4 to 1/2 cup more flour in towards the end of kneading.


Bulk rise 2 hours with S&F every hour. Retard in fridge for a couple of hours, this was purely for scheduling reasons. Warm for an hour, S&F, warm another 30 minutes, form a boule. Proof until ready.


Bake at 450 for 20 minutes, reduce heat to 425 for 25 minutes. The result:




 


The flavor is wonderful. The crumb is a sort of alarming grey, but that's just the oatmeal. You can't feel the 7-grain cereal (which is a hearty cracked grain thing) but you can see it in there. I was looking for a more open crumb, but I probably wound up overworking it in my struggles with apparent hydration. As you can see it was a trifle underproofed (frankly, it may still have been cool from the fridge inside) and my scoring.. sucks.


When I do it again:



  • less salt, 2 tsp not 1 T as indicated. The flavor is wonderful, and also salty!

  • more flour initially (in the mixing pre-autolyse)


It seems as if the whole grains absorbed more liquid than I expected, which is partly why I wound up oversalting. Also, I can't do arithmetic well. Anyways. ALSO I think that when I started to knead the oatmeal started to give up the water it had soaked up, so my apparent hydration shot up (i.e. it started feeling REALLY WET). The lesson here is to mix it to quite firm in the bowl, I'm going to try for more of a 55 percent hydration "feel" in the bowl, a firm American Bread kind of feel, then autolyze, and then knead. I am hoping that the oatmeal (or whatever it was) will give up water again, and bring me back to my nice moist dough for the bulk rise.


I think I will also proof my second yeast (the yeast that goes into the dough mixture in the morning) in 1/4 cup warm water, to allow for more bread flour to be mixed in to hit my target hydration. I wanted a somewhat larger loaf than I got, since the whole grains soaked up more water than I expected. I'd really like to get that 1 1/2 cups of bread flour into the dough, and I simply need more water than I had. So, the next version of this recipe I will be using uses the bouillie and poolish as above, and:


Proof 1/8 tsp rapid rise yeast (or 1/4 tsp regular dry yeast) in 1/4 cup warm water. Sprinkle 2 tsp salt onto the bouillie and mix, then mix in the poolish and the proofed yeast. Next, mix in flour to get a firm dough (approx 1 1/2 cups). Autolyse 30 minutes, knead to moderate development. Bulk rise 2-3 hours with S&F hourly. Retard a couple of hours in the fridge (or not, as you like, really). Warm to room temp with hourly S&F for a couple hours, shape, proof, bake as above!


 

qahtan's picture
qahtan

cheese fabulous cheese

these are the most fabulous cheese cookies ever.


http://saltandserenity.com/2010/08/13/les-fougeres-cheese-biscuits/


 


Les Fougeres Cheese Biscuits
SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Den Lepard's Roasted Potato Focaccia

I am saving Txfarmer's 36 hour baguettes for next weekend, when I'll be home (for a few days) with my dear, powerful oven... ;-)


 


In my present situation, I opted for a simpler baking adventure, and made Lepard's focaccia, which turned out DELICIOUS!   I include a photo here, and for those interested in the description, a link to my blog


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.com/2010/10/03/roasted-potato-and-olive-focaccia/


 


Good thing I went for a tough run this morning, it's the only way to counteract the calories packed in this baby... :-)


 



 


 

BerniePiel's picture
BerniePiel

Tartine Basic Country Loaf with raisins and pistachio

I have really become enamored of late with Chad Robertson's Tartine Bread, particularly his basic country loaf which is a combination of APF or BF and WWF.  I had to experiment with some raisins and pistachios that I had on hand.  The methodology was identical to Robertson's given in the text, same proportions, same times and so forth.  My only variation is that I use spring water, I mill local Oklahoma winter hard red wheatberries, and perhaps my method of folding the bread and the number of times that I fold versus the text.  I fold 4 or more times depending on what kind of structure I see developing; Chad states he folds three times every 25 minutes during the bulk rise.  I add one of two extra folds.  Also, I do not use all of the 50 g of water that he calls for when addiing the 20 g of salt after the inital 20 minute autolyse.  I usually just end up adding 25 g rather than the entire 50 because I feel it makes my dough to wet.


I have also discovered that his temps of water and air environment called for at various locations in the recipe should be adhered to.  He states using water at 80 degrees and he's right.  I tried using my ambient temp water at between 65 and 72 and the dough behaved differently.  The bulk rise and final rise temps should also be between 78 and 82 which is conducive to good yeast activity and providing a proper amount of time for the flavors to be created in the dough.


In this bread I added 1 1/2 cups of currants (a smaller dark raisin) and 1 1/2 cups of unsalted pistachio nuts, added at the first folding following  the 20 minutes autolyse or rrest.  It took several minutes to incorporate these two items evenly throughout the dough.  If you skimp here, the raisnins and nuts will be along the inside of the crust edge rather than scattered throughout the loaf.


Also, as the recipe states, it will make two loaves.  During this bake, I cooked the first loaf immediately ater the final rise.  The second loaf I allowed to ferment in the fridge for 12 hours just to see if  there was a difference in taste.  There is and its quite good.  But, even without that fermentation period, the bread was also very good.  But, the time in the fridge did improve the flavor.


Finally, I baked these two loaves in a round clay couche that I soaked before puttiing into the oven and I added  them as tthe oven was heating.  The oven was up to 360 degrees when I added the couche (normally I put my cooking vessel in when I fire up the oven, but I forgot this time.)  The clay vessel had been soaking in water for 15 minutes just prior to going in the oven to preheat befoe i added the boules.


I put the loaves in when my temp reached 515, put the top on and after 10 minutes, turned the oven down to 450.  After a total of 20 minutes had elapsed from the time I first put the dough in the clay pot, I took the lid off and baked for another 20 minutes at 450.  The crust becomes harder, good carmelization, and the interior crumb is chewy and flavorful.  I really, really like this bread.


Here are the pix:


 


from the oven couche


 


troutski's picture
troutski

Jim Lahey's no knead

Just baked my first basic loaf from the book. Aside from being a little scorched on the bottom (Note to self:oven runs hotter than advertized at higher temps...)


This was the simplest and one  if the best loaves for texture that I have made. good thing I held on to that ancient dutch oven of my grandmother's....


 


I can't wait to try it again in sourdough version.


 


Just gloating....


 


Mark


 

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