The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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gmask1's picture
gmask1

Rye Loaf 6

Well, I took all of your comments with me to the kitchen, and turned out the loaves you see below: 

Not too dissimilar from my previous attempt, however I did note some differences:

- They're hard to make out, but you might be able to spot the holes in the top of the left loaf where I tried to dock each of the loaves using suggestions on my last blog entry (this was done prior to proofing). I didn't have a pencil handy, but I did have a chopstick, and used it to make half-inch or so holes along the top of the loaves. The dough was still pretty sticky and clung to the chopstick, so I'm unsure whether they had any lasting effect, or if they just closed up again during proofing. The loafs tore along the side as you can see.

- The fermentation times were changed, in the order of 12 hours for the first rise, then about 18 for the second (including 9 hours at room temperature, 8 hours in the fridge while I was at work, and 1 hour returning to room temperature). Proofing was two hours. The final loaves are not nearly as tangy as my previous attempt, and taste much more like the loaves we buy from the grocery (the word that came to mind was 'mainstream', but I'm not sure that's appropriate!).

- On the suggestion of a friend at work, I used a spray bottle to moisten the top of the loaves immediately prior to loading them in the oven. The resulting crust is much softer than the previous attempt, and not as chewy. I'm not sure if there's a direct link there, but it certainly seems that way. 

chahira daoud's picture
chahira daoud

Fanoos Ramadan"Ramadan Lantern"

Fanoos Ramadan or Ramadan's Lamp or lantern is one of the Egyptian traditions however it is known in many other Islamic countries now. The tradition started in the year 358 AH (Hijri) on the 15th of Ramadan when the Fatimi leader El Mo'ez Le Deen Allah enered Egypt, and the Egyptians recieved him with lamps and torches. And since then the Fanoos has been known as one of the main symbols of Ramadan and most of the people own it and light it in Ramadan, especially children. There has been also varios songs related to Ramadan talking about the Fanoos and the Mesaharaty - some one who wakes people up at night in order to eat before fasting. The tradition fanoos contained a candle in it, while today's ones have different shapes and using battries and LED's instead of candles

During the competition , that i told you about it, i tried to make " fanoos" from " la pate morte" or the dead dough,i really do not like the idea of decorative stuff using eatable ingredients, so i made a small one, i do not like to consume a lot of flour and oil , just to decorate non eatable and decorative dish because some people die from hunger, anyway, here you are the pics of my fanoos,

In this picture, i put a real candle, the necklace also from the pate morte" actually it is not a necklace", muslims use it in praying and mention allah"I saw it also in the hands of christian nans, they use  it too, i saw it when i was in my christian nans school " la mere de dieu".

but i do not know its name in english " what a shame!!!"

I use my fanoos to decorate our dinning  room table during the whole month.

Anyway did you like my fanoos???

kconvey's picture
kconvey

Cinnamon bun recipe

Hi all, I am new here, and I hoping that someone will have the recipe I am looking for.  I used to work at a coffee shop while in college and we got these cinnamon buns in that we more like shortbread or shortcake dough, almost cookie like but cake like. They were dense and not as fluffy as a regular cinnamon bun.  They also didn't have any glaze od any kind.  Has anyone had something similar or made them?  Thanks for your help...

Marni's picture
Marni

What am I doing wrong?

So here's the thing, I'm no expert, but I can definitely bake a tasty loaf of bread. Most times, my bread comes out as I expect it to, or at least pretty darn close to it. I have always baked with *gasp* volume measurements, but since reading so much about how weight is better, I have tried following some formulas using weights. Without exception, they have failed. My recent attempt was not a total failure, but was not what I expected. I used the formula for Susan's loaf that David Snyder blogged about a few days ago. The bread hardly rose at all, had
practically no oven spring (I used a cloche), and is slightly rubbery and damp inside. The crust was not at all crisp by the time it cooled. The taste itself is quite good. Slightly tangy and sweet. Fragrant too.

I have to admit, I could not use those exact ingredients, so I substituted WWW for rye and added a gram or so of vital wheat gluten since I didn't have the high protein flour. That might be what caused the problem. Does anyone know?

Also would too few or too many french folds be a problem. The kids kept distracting me from keeping count. This was the first time I have used french folds ( I've been watching the videos posted on the site) and loved watching the dough develop. It's really a fun technique.

My last thought is that maybe I relied too much on weighing and didn't try to correct the dough at all. It was a pretty firm dough and usually
my sourdoughs are wetter and softer.

Thanks for any insights.

Marni

Flat loaves

Flat loaves

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Flat Loaf Crumb

Flat Loaf Crumb

chahira daoud's picture
chahira daoud

pumpkin yeast bread " recipe & preparation steps"

Hello everybody,

It was my first attempt to use pumpkin in baking ,i was totally amazed from the result, the bread was light , veeeery delicious, my kids could not wait even to fill its slice with any filling, so i will put the recipe and try it, you will not stop making it.

I got the recipe from a french book" i think that the original version was in english because the author is australian, i do not know exactly, her name is Ann wilson , the book name is " Pains et petits pains".

I love the book because 99% of the ingredients used are familiar in Egypt,except " Rye flour"< we do not have, can you send me some pleaaaaaaase, hahahaha,There is a pumpernickel recipe,and i can not do it ,do not you feel petty for me????

Anyway , i will show you the pumpkin kind that i used in the recipe,

That is the only kind we have in Egypt, and we use pumpkin rarely, that is a shame !!! we have very good pumpkin harvest.So i tried to use and create a lot of recipes " in which pumpkin is a main ingredient".O.K, i will start now, here is the recipe:-

7g. yeast" i used fresh yeast , about 1 tbls"

1/4 cup of pumpkin boiling water " in the recipe they boiled the pumpkin, i did not , i cooked it in the oven, i made it puree, and i left it in a strainer to get rid from its juice, and i used this juice to prepare the dough"

4-41/2 cups bread flour.

1 tspn salt

1 cup of pumpkin puree " about 300 g. raw pumpkin", it was different with me because this kind of pumpkin is veeery juicy, i got a lot of liquid from it"

1/4-1/2 cup pumpkin water.

1 beaten egg.

2 tspn water

pumpkin seeds for decoration.

instead of explaining i will let you with the pics, and feel free to ask about everythink , that you think it is not clear.

First the pumpkin from inside:

url=http://www.0zz0.com][/url]

Here is my lovely yeast" i am in love with yeast"

I gave it to eat " some sugar " i made for her some massage , then i cover her to take a nap,she became now very good and happy,

I started to prepare the ingredients, then making the dough.

I kneaded it for 10 mn,it turned soft and smooth like a baby skin.

I put 2 drops of olive oil on it to prevent it from sticking . then i covered it with a clean towel " of course"

shshshshsh, i warned all my family members, not to disturb my baby" i am fool , am not i???"

it is ready now , let us start the game,i re knead it for 2 mn.

I took 1/4 the dough,

then the remaining dough, i made with it a ball, and i put it in a sponge cake pan after oiling it and

sprinkle it with flour" i used corn flour"

I glazed it with the beaten egg, then i decorated it with the rubbon.

I glazed it again, i let it to rise.

My oven was too busy this day, so i let it more than an hour" it became like a monster" oh!lalala!!! 

url=http://www.0zz0.com][/url]

I forgot to tell you about the pumpkin seeds.

I baked it on 210c.

here it is:

url=http://www.0zz0.com][/url]

I forgot to take a pic for it after removing it from the pan.

So on my second attempt, with another shape , i did, voila,

And the Crumb??????

I will let  to you the judgment!!!!!????

Sorry for taking too much time, but i think the details will be so helpfull for beginners.

Thank you , and for all the yeast & bread making fans, a big hug from me to you.

Chahira DAoud , Alexandria , Egypt.

P.S: wait for my " pate morte" lantern & our feast cookies & biscuits.

sharsilber's picture
sharsilber

Diastatic Malt Powder

I have been baking challah bread for about a year and am planning to make about 30 next weekend.  In order to bake a few a day ahead I have been looking into some natural products that extend the bread's shelf life.  Has anyone used dastatic malt powder in their yeast breads?  Does it really help keep it fresher longer?

I would love some input.

Sharon

www.thebraidedloaf.com

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Susan from San Diego's Sourdough - I join the fan club

Susan from San Diego Sourdough


Susan from San Diego Sourdough


Susan's Sourdough Crumb


Susan's Sourdough Crumb

It was time to get back to basics. My wife and I love sourdough bread. I have been having lots of fun exploring other breads, especially rye breads and baguettes of late, but I was missing "plain old" sourdough bread.

 The formula that Susan from San Diego developed has been made by many on TFL, and, if there is anyone who has not loved it, they have kept it to themselves. So, Susan's sourdough has been on my "to bake" list for quite some time. Here is how I made it:

450 gms Giusto's Ultimate Performer (High Gluten Flour)

50 gms Giusto's (Whole) Rye Flour

340 gms Water

50 gms Active Starter

10 gms Sea Salt

 

Mix the water and flour in a large bowl until they form a shaggy mass. Cover tightly and allow to rest (autolyse) for 15-60 minutes.

Add the starter to the autolyse and mix it in. Then add the salt and mix it in.

On a lightly floured bench, do 4 or 5 French folds. Cover the dough for 30 minutes. Repeat the folds and resting for 30 minutes. Then, do the folds a third time. (At this point, I had moderate gluten development.)

Place the dough in a clean, lightly oiled bowl and cover tightly. Allow to rise until doubled. (I used my favorite Anchor Glass 8 cup/2 liter glass pitcher with a tight-fitting plastic cover. My dough doubled in 6 hours.)

Divide the dough into two equal pieces and pre-shape as rounds. Cover and allow to rest for 10-20 minutes.

Shape as boules and place in floured bannetons. (I used French linen-lined wicker ones.) Spray lightly with oil and place in food-grade plastic bags or cover with plastic wrap.

Proof for 1 hour, then place in the refrigerator over night (8-12 hours).

Take the loaves out of the refrigerator at least 4 hours before you plan to bake them. Allow them to warm up and rise to 1-1/2 times their original size.

45-60 minutes before baking, pre-heat the oven to 450F with a baking stone on the middle shelf and a cast iron skillet and metal loaf pan on the bottom shelf.

When the loaves are ready to bake, bring a cup of water to a boil and place a handful (4-6) ice cubes in the loaf pan. Shut the oven door.

Sprinkle semolina on a wooden peel. Transfer a loaf to the peel. Score it, and load it on the baking stone. Do the same with the second loaf. Then pour the boiling water into the skillet, being careful not to scald youself, and shut the oven door.

After 10 minutes, remove the two water recepticles from the oven. Bake another 10-15 minutes, until the loaves are nicely colored, the bottoms have a hollow sound when thumped and the internal temperature of the loaves is at least 205F. When they are done, turn off the oven but leave the loaves on the baking stone with the oven door held open 1-2 inches for another 5-10 minutes to dry the crust.

Remove the loaves from the oven and cool them thoroughly on a rack before slicing. (2 hours, if you can stand it.) You are allowed to smell the loaves and listen to them sing while they are cooling.

Notes
1. My sourdough starter is "1:3:4" (starter:water:flour). If your starter is more liquid or more firm, you should adjust the amount of water you use in the dough accordingly.
2. The 2-pan oven humidification and steaming method is from Hamelman's "Bread." Susan bakes her loaves under a stainless steel bowl for the first 1/2 to 2/3 of the time. I would have done this, if I had made a single large boule. But Hamelman's method gives me the second best oven spring and bloom.
3. With overnight cold retardation, this bread was moderately sour when first cool. The crust was thin but crunchy. The bread had a firm chewiness but was in no way "tough." It was, in short, what I regard as a "classic San Francisco-style Sourdough." Since this is precisely what I wanted, I am delighted with this bread. I am moving it from my "to bake" list to my "bake often" list.

David

JIP's picture
JIP

Metal lame handle???

I am currently using the coffe stirrer + razor blade method and would like something more permanent.  I have seen these somewhere before from what I can remember there were 2 one was a straight one and one was curved.  I am totally lost as to where I did see them and just did a search on Google and came up with nothing.  So can anyone remind me where I did see this item as I am getting tired of having to carve my coffe stirrers to fit throught the razor blades.  Also I have tried the plastic disposable lames that they sell alot of places and have found them to bee quite dull compared to the traditional double edged razor.  

Cendrillon's picture
Cendrillon

No knead... French style

I found the no-knead recipe on a French cookery forum a couple of years ago.

Slightly overcooked, but I was so pleased when I saw! I never expected the wet sticky dough to do wo well!

 

Cendrillon

Larry Clark's picture
Larry Clark

Is this actually working?


I checked Hamelman's  "Bread" out of the library, mostly because I wanted to learn to braid the Winston Knot. While thumbing through the book, I came across a section on scoring loaves and according to him I've been doing it all wrong. He insists that the slashes start on the left end of the bread and work toward the right AND the slashing stroke should be done left to right - backhanded. How could this possibly make a difference?
Well, yesterday I needed a "quickie" baguette and after the final proof decided, "What the hey?" and tried Hamelman's technique. The first cut I tried was too deep and just dragged the dough, so I lightened my touch and sort of scratched the surface. Disappointed in my attempts, I put the bread in the oven and this is what came out.

 

 This morning, I tried it again on some Anis baguettes:

 

 Both of these were 75% hydration doughs and I've never had this kind of success on wetter doughs.

I don't understand it, but I'm going to keep doing it until something better comes along.

 

 Larry

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