The Fresh Loaf

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varda's picture
varda

Borodinsky, Borodinsky, and Miche

Other people's obsessions can be dull.   That's what the back button, the scroll button and the  block this user button are for.    But if you'll bear with me I have more to say about Borodinsky.    First, misunderstanding a suggestion by eliabel, I searched high and low and found a Russian grocery in Allston, MA which carries Kvas.   So I made the trek over there, and discovered that they also carried Borodinsky.    I bought a loaf, prepared in a sliced sandwich bread format, thinking how good could this be?    The answer - extremely good, extremely fresh, extremely coriandery.   I consider myself corrected.   Then it turns out that eliabel was not suggesting that I buy bottled Kvas, but instead Kvas concentrate.   But I had my Kvas, and by golly (remember, this is a well-mannered site) I was going to use it.  

The Big Sky Borodinsky

The Kvas - It tasted like bread.

Borodinsky with Kvas

Again I followed Andy's Feb 6, 2012 post, but with enough deviations that it warrants specifying formula and method directly.

Rye Sour

 

2:00 PM

9:00 PM

 

 

 

Seed

50

 

 

 

 

 

Dark Rye

12

 

 

12

 

 

Whole Rye

15

75

125

215

 

 

Water

23

147

208

378

167%

 

 

 

 

 

605

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Rye

104

 

 

 

 

 

Malted Rye

 

 

 

 

 

 

Molasses

41

 

 

 

 

 

Boiling Kvas

272

 

 

 

 

 

Ground coriander

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

420

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sponge

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rye Sour

552

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

420

 

 

 

 

 

 

972

 

 

 

 

 

Final dough

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Rye

207

 

 

 

 

 

KA Bread Flour

138

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

 

 

 

 

 

Sponge

972

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final

Sour

Scald

Total

Percent

 

Whole Rye

207

196

104

506

 

 

Dark Rye

 

11

 

11

 

 

KA Bread Flour

138

 

 

138

21%

 

Water

 

345

 

345

94%

 

Kvas

 

 

272

272

 

 

Malt

 

 

0

0

 

 

Molasses

 

 

41

41

 

 

Salt

10

 

 

10

 

 

Coriander

 

 

 

3

 

 

Sponge

972

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

552

420

1327

 

 

Sour factor

0.91

 

 

 

 

 

Feed starter as above

At second feeding, make the scald

Leave overnight (15 minutes short of 10 hours)

Mix scald and starter

Ferment for just over 4 hours

Add final ingredients - mix by hand until blended

Ferment for 1 hour

Note that paste was very fluffy and aerated at this point

Spoon into greased bread pan.   Smooth down with wet spatula

Spray top with water and do so at intervals (Mini's suggestion)

Using spatula, separate top edge of bread from pan (Mini's suggestion)

Cover with Pullman top

Proof for 2 hours 5 minutes

Note -Very bubbly and starting to get holey on top

Oven preheated to 550F for 1 hour - steam pan for last 30 minutes of preheat

Put bread in oven and bring temperature back to 550  (Note I was too worried to cover it for first 15 minutes since it had risen so much during proof - I could have though)

Then reduce to 350F

Bake for 1 hour 15 min (without top for first 15 minutes with top for an hour)

then remove steam pan, remove bread from pan and bake for 30 minutes

Note that uncooked dough weight was 1275 so lost 52g in between steps

Tastewise, and despite the fact that I used canned Kvas rather than roasted rye malt, this was the best yet.   Absolutely delicious, with sort of a tart, tangy taste overlaid on the (freshly ground) coriander, malt, and molasses.   Addictively delicious.   Watch out.  

 

As for the miche, I have been wanting to follow David's SFBI miche for awhile now, but lacked what I thought was a suitable flour.   When push came to shove, though, my thinking and flour had deviated too much, so I'll just say that I was inspired by David's miches.

First the flour:  I don't seem to be able to find high extraction flour around here, short of milling it myself.   So I decided to sift.   My first try was unsuccessful and essentially I had whole wheat flour.   So I decided to buy a better sieve.  

That made a big difference.   For this miche, I started with 360g of whole wheat flour, generated 30g of bran, and 30g went missing.   So I can't calculate the extraction but it looked good.   Then I followed David in using only half high extraction.   In my case, I used KA Bread Flour as the other half.   

But before I could get to actually making a SFBI miche, I had to pursue a different line of thought.  I was somewhat startled the other day, when I made a Pain Au Levain with no Stretch and Fold whatsoever.   I am totally imprinted on Hamelman - he says Stretch and Fold, so I Stretch and Fold.    But my curiousity was piqued.     This time I decided to make up a very wet dough and develop it in the mixer for as long as it took and then again no Stretch and Fold.    So I made up an 83% hydration dough and mixed it in my humble Kitchen Aid - first at speed 1 for 35 minutes, and then at speed 2 for 10 minutes, with plenty of scrape downs along the way.   The dough came together quite nicely and strongly at the 45 minute mark.    Then I let it bulk ferment without touching it for  3.5 hours, and continued on my way.

Given the hazards of working with such wet dough, then I stumbled.   I proofed in a big ceramic bowl dusted with flour, but it was too big, so I had to basically drop the dough out of it onto the peel.   This compressed the bottom of the loaf a bit.   Worse yet, it snagged on the peel when I "slid" it into the oven.   To heck with the shape.   Despite all that, I think the crumb came out very nicely.   Undoubtedly it would have been quite different had I done a shorter mix, and a few stretch and folds.    But I kind of like this result.  

 

KateKat's picture
KateKat

Grain Suppliers in the UK

Hi,

I started home milling about 8 months ago now and have had trouble tracking down a decent supply of organic grain in the UK for home milling, recently I managed to link up with a very helpful, very friendly farmer and thought I would share the experience.

Whilst searching for farmers who might be willing to supply smaller quantities (where smaller = 25Kg) I managed to find the website for a UK cooperarive called Organic Arable and dropped them an email, they were very friendly and put me in touch with Howard Roberts at Hammonds End Farm near Harpenden. He was amazingly helpful and I've managed to buy about a years worth of grain, they sell in 25Kg sacks, all organic, soil association certified as well. (http://www.hammondsend.co.uk/)

They have wheat, spelt, oats & rye. Two varieties of wheat, Paragon & Amaretto, the 2011 crop has around 13% protein in both varieties. I've bought 25Kg of both Paragon & Amaratto and done some milling with the Paragon so far and that has a lovelly taste, on the taste front the Paragon is stronger than the Amaretto so I'm told. The grain itself was very clean compare to the previous grain I've had from a different source that had lots of chaff, stalk and grass/poppy seed and had to be hand cleaned before milling.

If you are in the UK and need some grain I can heartily recommend them.

Kate

 

Szanter5339's picture
Szanter5339

Kenyér élesztő nélkül, csak kovásszal.

Kenyér élesztő nélkül, csak kovásszal.
Én így készítem.350 ml víz       ( + -  2-3 evőkanál)3 kávéskanál só50 dkg BL 55 liszt20 dkg félfogós vagy (rétes liszt)1 evőkanál rozsliszt+ 25 dkg érett kovászEzt előbb olvassátok el a kovászról!!!!!Én is így készítem a kovászt.1. 
3 evőkanál teljes őrlésű búzaliszt vagy rozsliszt vagy tönkölyliszt 
3 evőkanál víz (kb. 40°C-os)
A vizet a liszttel elkeverjük és letakarva, meleg helyen (kb. 20-22 °C-on), 1-2 napot állni hagyjuk.

2.
3 evőkanál teljes őrlésű liszt 
3 evőkanál víz (kb. 40°C-os
Mindezt az 1. lépcsőben elkészített masszához keverjük, amely már kellemes, savanykás szagot áraszt. Ismét letakarjuk, és 20°C-on 1 napot állni hagyjuk.

3. 
10 dkg teljes őrlésű búzaliszt vagy rozsliszt
1 dl víz (kb. 40°C-os)
Az előzőekkel összekeverjük, és letakarva, 20°C-on ismét egy napig állni hagyjuk.Kenyérsütés, lépésről lépésre.Délután dagasztok, hogy  este tudjam a hűtőbe tenni.A vízből kicsit meghagyok és beleteszem a sót, lisztet, és a kovászt. Dagasztom, és ha szükséges még adok hozzá vizet, vagy lisztet. Minden liszt más-más, ezért nem mindig egyforma a víz mennyisége.Inkább kemény tésztát dagasztok, fényesre, hólyagosra.  Beleteszem egy tálba és kelesztem 2-3 órahosszáig.Mikor megkelt,kiborítom a tálból és kicsit tenyeremmel megformázom, nem nagyon nyomkodom,.ésbelerakom a szakajtóba.  Betakarom és északára beteszem a hűtőbe.Reggel kiveszem a hűtőből és 20-25 percet várok majd átfordítom a papírral bélelt beáztatott cserépedénybe ,bespriccelem vízzel, bevágom a tetejét éles pengével és ráteszem a tetőt .A cserépedény tetejét is papírral bélelem.210 fokos sütőbe rakom, és 50 percig sütöm, majd leveszem a tetőt, és tovább sütöm a piros szín eléréséigMikor kiveszem, bespriccelem vízzel. Először nagyon kemény a héja de mire kihűl,  ropogós lágy kenyerünk lesz! 

 

infidel's picture
infidel

Stalled sourdough starter

Hello all from Ottawa,

This is my first post here.  I'm a middle aged male from Canada, attempting my first sourdough starter.  I've been doing a lot of reading and learning at this excellent site for a few weeks now, but I have hit a seemingly brick wall that I could use some advice to get through.  My new starter has stalled, and I can't figure out why.

My first attempt using equal weights of white flour and spring water turned into a smelly mess on day two, so I tossed it and found my way to this site.  Found Debra Wink's pineapple method (what a great resource and nice person she is!), and had good luck with getting the second attempt going using wheat flour and pineapple juice.  All seemed to be going as it should, and on day four after feeding at 1:1:1, it almost doubled in about 8 hours.  It smelled good, and had lots of tiny bubbles.  I was sure I was on my way.  I began feeding every 8 - 12 hours.  The next feeding I switched to white flour, and went to a 1:2:2 feeding.  I'm using bottled spring water, and I do have a gram scale, so I am going by weight, not volume.  At this point it stopped.  No rise at all, though it does get some surface bubbles and a very few tiny bubbles.  Several feedings later, and still no rise.  I thought maybe I was overfeeding it, so I let it sit for a day with no feeding.  It started smelling like nail polish remover, so I knew from some research here that it was getting hungry, and overfeeding was not the problem.  Fed it again at 1:1:1.  Nail polish remover smell went away, but still no rise.  Fed it at 1:3:3.  Nothing.  Fed it again at 1:2:2.  Zip.  Tried using tap water instead of spring water.  No difference.  It smells okay, no stink, no acetone smell, no hootch.  It's like stiff pancake batter, and very stretchy.  So my last feeding an hour ago, I switched back to the wheat flour to see if that would give it a boost.  It's been 2 hours and so far nothing.  All this time I have had it in a beaker with a graduated scale, and I set up a camera to take a pic every 5 minutes while I am at work, so I know it is not rising and falling before I come home.  I have a thermometer right beside the beaker, and it averages 74 degrees.  I would attach pics if I could, but that doesn't seem possible unless the pics are online.  Any advice much appreciated! 

Dean

superczech's picture
superczech

McCormick & Schmick's Seafood restaurant BREAD

I LOVE McCormick & Schmick's bread. Not sure if their bread varies by what state they are in... This one is in Chicago on Wacker.

This lovely bread has soft golden brown crust and is nice and fluffy. It has a sour dough/vinegar taste to it.

I have baked sourdough bread before, but the crust has turned out to be very hard.... How do I get the crust to be softer?

And does anybody have any idea what kind of bread McCormick & Schmick's in Chicago bake???

Thank you!

superczech's picture
superczech

McCormick & Schmick's Seafood restaurant BREAD

I LOVE McCormick & Schmick's bread. Not sure if their bread varies by what state they are in... This one is in Chicago on Wacker.

This lovely bread has soft golden brown crust and is nice and fluffy. It has a sour dough/vinegar taste to it.

I have baked sourdough bread before, but the crust has turned out to be very hard.... How do I get the crust to be softer?

And does anybody have any idea what kind of bread McCormick & Schmick's in Chicago bake???

Thank you!

 

Pioneer Foodie's picture
Pioneer Foodie

Rustic French dough trough

A while ago I saw a link here to a video (in French) about a rustic French wood-fired bakery. In the video one baker worked up about 50 lbs. of dough by hand in a wooden trough in about five minutes. 

I can't find the link now. Does anyone have a link?

Jonas's picture
Jonas

White sourdough bread with a little spelt

White sourdoughbread with a little spelt (hydration 71%)

500 grams of white levain 100% hydration
500 grams of organic roller mill bread flour 11% protein
150 grams of organic stone ground bread flour 10% protein
100 grams of organic stone ground whole grain spelt flour ( I like a bit of whole grain in my white bread)
465 grams of water
18 grams of organic sea salt

Mix everything but the salt by hand for a couple of minutes. Autolyse for one hour. Add salt and knead by hand for two to three minutes.
Put the dough in pastic box with a little oil. Stretch and fold and rest for 30 minutes, repeat and rest for 30 minutes,
repeat one last time and rest for one hour. Pre-shape two loaves and rest 10-15 minutes. Shape batards and place in benettons.
Rest overnight in refrigerator, about 11 hours. Take out the dough and let it rest in room temperature for about 45 minutes.
Then place in pre-heated oven with baking stone. Steam for the first 15 minutes.

Rather pleased with the crumb which came out soft and airy. Lots of holes, but not the really big ones.
I´m finding it hard to achive big holes in the crumb whith the flour I am using. Maybe the flour is too weak?
We don´t have bread flour with 13-14% protein content like you do in the USA. 11% protein is considered strong here in Sweden.



Didn´t get much oven spring with this bread. I´m gonna have to work on that. I find it harder with higher hydration dough.

The crust is rather thin, would like it a bit thicker. Wondering why I get those cracks on the outside of the crust?
I don´t normally get those with other recipes. Also getting some pockets of air between the crust and the crumb.



Any help and ideas would be much appreciated. I hope you can understand my "english".

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Still baking - now with proof box

Hi,

As many others these days I mainly baked my tried and tested formulas, with not much new to blog about.

With exception of my proof box - the parts were on top of a cupboard since last summer, but now I am putting them to good use.

I think the quality of my ryes have greatly improved since.

The parts for the proof box

1. cheap picnic cooler

2. reptile thermostat

3. reptile heat mat

4. cooling rack

Here a photo:

Just a few photos from last weekend's bake, which was mainly for restocking the freezer:

1. Some ITJB Vienna Bread and Hamelman's Sunflower Seed Bread with pate fermentee

2. Some Challah (DiMuzio's sweet challah) for a school function:

3. Finally my weekly batch of 40% Rye with caraway seeds, and Russian Rye a la Andrew Whitley

Keeping myself busy ...

Juergen

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

Pecan-Maple Scones

I didn’t think I’d want to be tied to the kitchen for bread-baking this weekend.  I did want to use up part of a large supply of pecans.  So I started looking for Pecan Scone recipes and found what looked like a great one in The Cheese Board Collective Works, the source of the wonderful Curry-Onion-Cheese Bread I’ve blogged about before (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22549/some-spice-breads-–-one-sweet-and-one-savory).  And indeed the scones were about the best I’ve made (and some of the best I’ve eaten).

These are free-formed scones with a maple glaze.  They come out very crunchy on the outside and moist and tender on the inside.  The Pecan and Maple combination is outstanding.  I think the secret to success—besides the great recipe—was keeping everything very cold and minimizing handling of the dough.

Here’s the recipe for 12-15 scones:

1. Preheat oven to 375 F. Prepare two sheet pans with parchment or silicon mats.

2.  In a large mixing bowl, sift together:

  • 3 ½ cups AP flour
  • 1 Tbsp Baking Powder
  • ½ tsp Baking Soda

3.  Mix in:

  • ½ tsp Sea Salt
  • ¾ cup Granulated sugar

4.  Cut ½ pound of cold sweet butter  into ¾ inch cubes and cut it into the dry ingredients with a pastry cutter or two knives until butter bits are about pea sized.

5.  Then stir in 1 ¼ cups rough chopped toasted pecans.

6.  Make a well and pour in ¾ cup of heavy cream and ¾ cup of buttermilk.  Mix until just blended.  Form gently into 2 inch balls (don’t worry if they’re not very spherical; minimize handling).  Place the balls 2” apart on sheet pans.

7.  Bake for about 30-35 minutes, until golden brown.

8.  About 5 minutes before the scones are done baking, pour  ½ cup of real maple syrup into a medium sized bowl and gradually whisk in 1 cup of sifted powdered sugar until the consistency is a thick glaze.

9.  When  the scones are done, transfer them to a wire cooling rack on top of newspaper or something like it to protect your counter.  After about 10 minutes of cooling (so the glaze doesn’t just melt off the scones), spoon the glaze over the scones (I used about ¾ of a tablespoon for each).

10.  Let cool until the glaze sets (about 10 impatient minutes).  Enjoy with a hot beverage.

One more photo from today.  A Flicker defeating the cage around our bird feeder.  They have very long tongues.

Glenn

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