The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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punkchef77's picture
punkchef77

sweet french bread

So this is my first post on this site. First I just want to say this site and all the members of the community are awesome. I am a school trained pastry chef and things have changed quite a bit sense I was last in the industry. Things like stretch and folds and autolysing were not used a decade ago when I was in school or in a commercial kitchen. This site has brought me up to date on quite a few things and for that I am thankful.

So on to my bread. I live in Sonoma County CA and also have lived in San Francisco. Growing up in the North Bay I have been very fortunate to have great bread everywhere. There are several great boulangeries in the area that produce what they call a sweet french bread. Being school trained I know that such a thing might be misnamed (and in France might get you some stern talking too). Normally french bread is a basic four bread ie flour,water,salt and yeast and sometimes starter. The bread in particular I am trying to re create also contains malt and shortening listed as ingredients. So in following with two of my favorite boulangeries I am also going to call this sweet french bread (all my chefs are probably going to yell at me for this lol). 

Cheers

Punkchef77

Note-I know I am going to catch flack for this but all my measurements are in volume (my scale is busted and I'm kinda broke)

Also I am super lucky to have Keith Giusto baking supply within 10 minutes of my house. Centeral Milling flour is awesome and if you have a Costco in your area I suggest picking up some of the organic APF. Its the same as the Bee Hive lightly malted organic APF and about half the cost.

Sponge 

1-1/2 c High mountian (bread flour 14%)

1/4 tsp Instant yeast.

1/2 tsp Diastatic malt

1 c cool water

Mix the above and let it do its thing for at least 4 hours 

Main dough

All of the sponge

1-1/2 c High mountian

2 tsp Shortening (melted and sloghtly cooled)

2 tsp Non Diastatic malt

1-1/4 tsp instant yeast

1 tsp salt

Mix all but the salt yeast and salt autolyse for 30min.

Add salt and yeast knead for 7-8 min speed 2 on KA

Let retard overnight in the fridge.

Shape into baguettes let proof in a couche then bake at 525F with steam for the first 10 min then lower the oven to 450F for about 15 more minutes.

I will post photos ASAP.

 

 

 

 

 

dazzer24's picture
dazzer24

Uk Flour

I'm baking crazy now. A few colleagues are buying loaves off me at work too so I'm considering buying in some larger sacks of flour-16kg seems to be the usual. I'm absolutely bewildered by the choice available. I've been using a very strong canadian white for my sourdough loaves which I like very much but its only available in the supermarket in 1.5kg bags. I recently ran out and used Allinsons very strong. It seemed less flavoursome but a little softer crumb. So perhaps I should be cutting one with the other to get the best of both worlds?

So I'd welcome any feedback from Uk based contributors on whom they use. I'm looking for someone whom I can order from online-unless someone knows a miller in North West England I can visit.

Marriages?Wrights?Doves?Shipton?Bacheldre? and there are many more I'm sure!

Help!(many thanks in advance for any contribution;)

Darren

Boboshempy's picture
Boboshempy

Pascal Pinaud Baguettes

Pascal Pinaud's baguettes in Paris are killer and I am wondering if anyone knows if his recipe/method is written up anywhere?

Here is a link to a picture of his baguettes:

 

Thanks!

Nick

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multigrain SD/YW Brown Bread with Aromatic Seeds and Multi-Grain Scald

This is yet another bread, and one still to go,  that resulted from the panettone bake where huge excesses of levain waste was required to build the Italian starter.  In this case we had some YW and SD levain hanging around in the fridge.  But the first thing we did was boil the scald for 5 minutes stirring all the time before covering and allowing it to cool on the counter.

  

The levain build was like a French casserole where any veggie in the fridge goes into the pot.  The two leftover levains, some more AP flour and some more YW and SD seed went into this levain casserole.   We’ve never zombied a levain like this before so it was fun, if not eventful, from a risen dead perspective.

 

The levain sat on the heating pad as we autolysed everything including the cocoa and instant coffee, except the scald and seeds, with the Guinness Black Lager- a beer we hadn’t tasted before.  This ended up being a 58% Whole grain loaf not including the whole grain scald and soak.  After two hours we deemed the autolyse ready for its zombie levain.

 

After mixing with a spoon to get things acquainted, we did 10 minutes of French Slap and folds to develop the gluten sufficiently.  After a 20 minute rest we incorporated the multigrain scald using a few S&F’s and a few slap and folds to get the dough back into shape.

  

The addition of the wet scald, that took the hydration up to what felt like about 82% or more, made the dough much slacker than its old self.  After another 20 minute rest, the aromatic seeds were incorporated into the dough with some more S&F’s and a few slap and folds which were more interesting with seeds and wet dough flying all over the place.

  

After another 20 minute rest we did one last set of slap and folds to get some shape into the dough and immediately  panned it into a large loaf pan that had been de-stickified with spray. We coverd the top with wheat adn oat bran and let it sit on the heating pad for about 3 hours until it had grown 3/4th of the way up the tin and then we retarded it for 12 hours.

When we retrieved it from the fridge it had risen to within ½” of the top of the tin rim.  We let it sit on the counter, no heating pad this time, for 2 1/2 hours before heating up the mini oven with Sylvia’s steaming cup.

 

The dough had risen to the rim by the time it went into the mini for 12 minutes of steam at 450 F.  It sprang about 1/2 “under steam.  Then we removed the steam and turned the heat down to 375 F, convection this time.

We continued to bake the loaf until it reached 205 F on the inside rotating the loaf 180 degrees after 10 minutes and also de-panning it to ensure even baking.  After 10 minutes we rotated the de-panned loaf again.  A total of 45 minutes and the loaf was done.

It browned up nicely but we will have to wait for the crumb shots.  Once cooled we will let this bread sit for 24 hours before cutting into it for lunch tomorrow.  Here it is the following morning and I couldn't wait for lunch since there was breakfast first :-) 

Plain, toasted with butter or with cream cheese... this bread is tasty - just plain delicious.  The crumb is open, glossy and very moist with chewy bits.  The crust went soft overnight which allowed for very thin slicing without crumbling.   I could eat this bread every day and if stranded on a desert isle, it would be one of the 50 breads my apprentice would lug along.  Can't wait to try it toasted with pate.

Formula

Starter Build

Build 1

Total

%

Rye, Spelt & WW SD Starter

25

25

5.61%

Whole Wheat

12

12

2.69%

Dark Rye

13

13

2.92%

AP

50

50

11.22%

Yeast Water

38

38

8.53%

Water

37

37

8.31%

Total

175

175

8.53%

 

 

 

 

SD Starter Totals

 

%

 

Flour

87.5

19.64%

 

Water

87.5

19.64%

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

18.88%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Rye

25

5.61%

 

Spelt

25

5.61%

 

Oat

25

5.61%

 

Quinoa

25

5.61%

 

AP

150

33.67%

 

Kamut

25

5.61%

 

Red Malt

5

1.12%

 

Toadies

5

1.12%

 

White Malt

3

0.67%

 

Whole Wheat

25

5.61%

 

9 Grain Cereal

25

5.61%

 

Potato Flakes

10

2.24%

 

Ground Flax Seed

10

2.24%

 

Total Dough Flour

358

80.36%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.80%

 

Black Guiness Lager

250

56.12%

 

Dough Hydration w/ Starter

69.83%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald & Soak

 

%

 

Kamut

15

3.37%

 

Spelt

15

3.37%

 

Rye

15

3.37%

 

Whole Wheat

15

3.37%

 

9 Grain Cereal

10

2.24%

 

Toadies

5

1.12%

 

Red Malt

5

1.12%

 

Flax Seed

5

1.12%

 

Total Scald & Soak

85

19.08%

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Anise & Coriender

5

1.12%

 

Instant Coffee & Cocoa Powder

20

4.49%

 

Barley Malt & Molasses

20

4.49%

 

Black & Brown Caraway

6

1.35%

 

Total

51

11.45%

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

445.5

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

337.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

78.00%

 

 

Total Weight

927

 

 

% Whole Grain Not Including Scald

58.47%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cman710's picture
cman710

Chorizo-Asadero Bread

Hi all,

This past weekend, I made Chorizo-Asadero Bread from The Homesick Texan cookbook.  I enjoyed the recipe, but I would like to make some changes. Since I am a novice bread baker, I wanted to get some opinions from those of you!

The recipe is as follows (I plan to convert the recipe to all weight measurements, but have not done so yet):

    • 1 packet active dry yeast
    • 1/4 cup warm water
    • 4 tbsp butter (I think...may have been 5)
    • 1 cup whole milk
    • 1 large egg
    • 3 cups AP flour
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 8 oz. Mexican chorizo, cooked
    • 8 oz. Asadero cheese, grated
    • 1 chipotle in adobo, diced

 First, I added the yeast to water.  Then, I melted the butter and then added the milk and egg.  I then added that mixture to the yeast, along with the the flour and salt. I stired with a wood spoon and the dough remained very wet, so I added some additional flour.  After kneading a relatively short time, I put the dough in an oiled bowl and left it 2 hours untl it doubled in size.

After two hours, I slowly incorporated about 4 ounces of the chorizo and about 3 ounces of asadero. Then, I shaped the loaf as a sandwich loaf and put it in a 9x5 loaf pan, and let it rise for about 2 hours, after which it had crested above the edges of the pan.  I baked the bread for 35 minutes, and misted the oven at the beginning of the bake.  When I took out the bread, its internal temperature  was 190. 

We really enjoyed the bread, but we found that it was too sweet. Do you think the sweetness is coming from the egg or the milk, or both?  I would like to eliminate the sweetness and perhaps make the texture a little bit tougher, too.  My thoughts for possible changes are as follows:

  • Add more chorizo (definite change)
  • Make half the flour KASL to improve texture
  • Use water instead of milk (?)
  • Eliminate egg (?)

What do you think? I only took one photo of the finished bread, but will post it later tonight.  Thanks!

 

jamcraft's picture
jamcraft

Apple Yeast for the first time

     

     

Today’s Bread [2013.2.4_5]

・100g Apple Yeast Leaven
・150g Lys d'or (bread flour)
・35g Super Fine Hard (whole wheat flour)
・3g Sea Salt
・115g Water (total 70% hydration dough)

  • 9 hours at room temperature (16~18C) bulk fermentation.
  • Baked covered steel cans.


by jamcraft, on Flickr

kap1492's picture
kap1492

Multiple Starters

Is there any benefit of having two different starters? I have a AP and WW, from what I have read is eventually they will become the same over time. Any difference in taste? Both are doing extremely well in the 10 days that they have been alive.

wayne on FLUKE's picture
wayne on FLUKE

Hoagies - Why is one so different?

 

Made a batch of hoagies this morning. I have baked these many times. Recipe is from http://www.pizzamaniac.com/archives/2005/08/10/grinder-hoagie-roll-recipe/

I mix, rest 20 min, add salt and OO, knead in Bosch compact 10 min, mostly on 2. Rise about 90 min (room temp 66 F)

All four were 195-196 grams,  pre-shape to logs, rest 10 min, shape, rise about 45 min, slash, mist bread and oven, bake at 450 in Chicago Metallic pans.

Any ideas why the one didn't open up like the other three?

Since it was cooler than usual they may have been a little underproofed relative to what passes for normal.

wayne

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Super Bowl Pizza – Great Pizza For a Lights Out, No longer a Blow Out Game

This crust was super for the Super Bowl.  Our best and most simple one to date – here is the recipe.

Biga

1/8 - tsp of active dry yeast

1/2 - tsp of sugar

120 g- AP flour

100 g- water

Mix yeast with sugar and water and let it sit for 5 minutes.  Then mix in the flour and let the biga sit on the counter overnight – 10 hours

Dough

300 g- flour

185 g- water

7 g– salt

This makes for 68% hydration dough with 1.5% salt.

Do 10 minutes of  French slap and folds and let sit in an oil covered bowl for 1 hour,  Do one set of S&F’s 4 quarter turns, and let it sit for another hour before refrigerating.  2 hours before you want to use it, take it out of the fridge and let it warm up.  We always par bake out crust for 3-4  minutes at 500 F on a stone before yaking them out to load them up with toppings.

 

I told Ian that I would tell him where the word crust comes from one day and since this was such a good crust, now is the time.

There is an old bread joke that Americans learned to bake bread from the French and the Brits.  The French and the Brits learned all they know about bread from Romans and the Romans learned all they know about baking bread from the Greeks.  The Greeks learned bread baking from the Egyptians and the Egyptians learned all they know about bread from a small artisan Jewish Bakery run by a Chinese baker in Jerusalem.

 

Paint with Mojo de Ajo and dock before par baking for 3-4 minutes.

There is way more truth to this than most want to admit.  An example is toast.  The Italians will tell you they invented garlic toast (and pizza too but that is another story), what we call bruschetta today , but this isn’t really accurate and historically correct.

 

There was a really famous Greek baker, at least as famous bakers could be before television, named Paximos who baked bread long before there was a Roman Empire for Greece to be conquered by.  He invented toast by roasting sliced bread on an open fire – a fairly simple recipe even then.  Paximos found that his sourdough toasted bread not only sold well but kept for an unusually long time, even for sourdough.  This allowed the Greek people people to travel with a food that was light weight and just the perfect road nosh.  It allowed the Greeks to open up over land and sea new trade routes to far away places.  Toast changed the world. 

 

Paximos called his toast Paximadi, after himself.  To this day you can travel all over Greece where in nearly every bakery, or outside it, you will see a sign proudly advertising Paximadi - toast.  Some is sweet for breakfast and some has garlic on it for warding off conquering Roman hordes and vampires  no doubt.

 

So, when the Romans finally invaded and conquered the Greeks, they discovered to their horror, that the Greeks had been making garlic toast – for centuries.   Something as good as Paximadi just couldn’t have a Greek name in the vast, all consuming Roman Empire.   So the Rimans changes the name of Paximadi; Greek garlic toast, to something way more Roman – Crustulum – the Roman word we take our word for crust from today.  But, we really should be calling crust Paxim if you ask me.

 

As a further note, when the Roman Empire fell, Italians stopped speaking Latin and picked up Italian as their daily vibe, they changed the name of Paximadi again - this time from Crustulum to Bruschetta.   Americans too use this modern word for Greek garlic toast today but Americans prefer an even more ancient Egyptian name for wheat and yeast based sustenance on Super Bowl Sunday - Brewskies!

FloridaBreadMan's picture
FloridaBreadMan

First "No Salt Added" Bread

This is my first Low Sodium "No Salt Added" Bread.  It came out better than I expected.

 

 

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