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hanseata's picture
hanseata

Olive Bread - Don't The Andersons Hate Olives?

There are two things members of our patchwork family have in common - we love good food and we hate olives!

Even the pickiest of our kids, Valerie, producer of the famous "square mouth" whenever I made her try at least one bite before she said she didn't like it; and Francesca who ordered "just white rice" when we ate at a restaurant, ended up as foodies. Valerie even became a chef!

The Andersons and their offspring pick olives off pizzas, and leave them untouched in the salad bowl. They don't order tapenade and don't drink martinis. But then something strange happened...

Knowing that a lot of people are olive fans and crave them in all kinds of foods, I looked for an olive bread recipe to satisfy those die-hards among my customers.

I found one in my favorite "Brot aus Südtirol" and decided to give it a try, tweaking it a bit (using a preferment and overnight refrigeration).

It was quite a struggle to force the slippery olives into the dough (maybe they sensed my negative vibes).

I also found it not very easy to roll the dough into the right shape for dividing it into equal sized pieces, without a lot of leftover cut-offs.

No wonder, my first batch of "Pane di Olive" looked like misshapen scones, with dark bruises (from my abuse?), but they didn't smell bad.

                Chef Valerie and proud Mom

With some misgivings and no great expectations I bit in an olive studded roll. Took another unbelieving bite and was deeply shocked - the olive bread tasted good, really good, incredibly good!

I gave one to Richard, the most willing guinea pig of all husbands (but, also, staunchest olive hater of us all) who eyed it with visible distrust. "You should probably call that "Malfatti" (Italian for "badly made") he suggested, but then, just to please me, nibbled gingerly at one corner.

IN NO TIME THE OLIVE BREAD WAS GONE!

Making the olive bread again and again - it proved to be a big hit with my customers at the natural food store, too - I learned a few tricks to make the mixing and shaping easier.

It is very important to use good quality olives, like Kalamata. The bread's taste depends on those olives, so don't skimp on this essential ingredient.

Good quality olives are a must!

Not only draining, but letting the olives dry for several hours on kitchen paper towels, makes them less slippery, and much more willing to embrace the dough. Killing two birds with one pit stone,
this simple measure also takes care of the ugly "bruising" of the bread.

Instead of using a preferment, I find it easier to work the dough with stretch and fold, with an overnight stay in the fridge. This method requires less yeast, so I reduced it a bit.

A template makes rolling the dough to the right size much easier

And, finally, a bit of calculation (not my strongest point) and a paper template made the rolling and cutting of the dough a cinch!

OLIVE BREAD   (adapted from Richard Ploner: "Brot aus Südtirol")
(10 pieces

250 g/8.8 oz Italian 00 flour
250 g/8.8 oz all-purpose flour
    4 g/0.14 oz instant yeast
    9 g/0.3 oz salt
    5 g/0.18 oz honey
  30 g/1.6 oz olive oil
100 g/3.5 oz Kalamata olives, pitted
240 g/8.5 oz water

TOPPING
12 g/0.4 oz milk
12 g/0.4 oz whipping cream
7 g/0.25 oz sugar

 

DAY 1:
Drain olives in a strainer, chop coarsely, place on kitchen paper towels, and let dry for several hours.

Drying the drained olives kills two birds with one stone

Mix all ingredients, except for olives, at low speed (or with large wooden spoon) for 1-2 minutes until all flour is hydrated. Let dough rest for 5 minutes.

Knead at medium-low speed (or by hand) for 2 minutes, adjusting with a little more water, if necessary (dough should be a bit sticky.) Knead for another 4 minutes, while feeding olives slowly to dough. It should still be somewhat sticky rather than just tacky.

Starting with the top, fold dough in thirds like a business letter

Transfer dough to a lightly oiled work surface. With oiled or wet hands, stretch and pat it into rough square. Fold from top to bottom in thirds, like a business letter. Then fold the same way from both sides. Gather dough into ball, and place, seam side down, into lightly oiled bowl. Cover, and let rest for 10 minutes.

After folding you have a neat little dough package

Repeat this stretching and folding 3 more times, at 10-minute intervals. After the last fold,  place dough, well covered, in refrigerator overnight. (It doesn't have to warm up before using.)

DAY 2:
Preheat oven to 410º F/210º C.  Cut parchment paper into a 24 x 30 cm/12 x 9.5" template. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.

Over night the dough has doubled in the frigde

In a little bowl, mix topping ingredients, place in microwave, and bring to a boil. Remove, and set aside.

Rolled out and marked


On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough to a square (24 x 30 cm/12 x 9.5"), using the template (about 1.5 cm/0.5" thick). Trim edges. Using pizza cutter or knife, cut dough square first lengthwise in half, then each half into in 5 equal pieces. The dough will be very soft.

Brush with milk mixture and dock with wooden spoon, so that the breads can't inflate.

Transfer pieces to parchment lined baking sheet. Brush with milk wash. Using the handle of a wooden spoon, press deep holes in the dough, evenly spaced. Cover, and let it rise for 30 - 45 minutes, or until breads stays dimpled when poked with finger.

Bake breads (no steam) for 10 minutes, rotate pan 180 degrees, and continue baking for another 10 minutes, until they are golden brown (internal temperature at least 200ºF/93ºC),

To this day we are still amazed that we Andersons do like olives - when they come with Olive Bread!

Post was completely updated 7/16/13

Submitted to Panissimo:  Bread & Companatico

                                         Indovina chi viene a cena                                            

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Sourdough Psomi after Greenstein's "Psomi Bread"


SD Psomi after Greenstein's "Psomi Bread"


On page 151-153 of Greenstein's “Secrets of a Jewish Baker,” there is a recipe for what he calls “Psomi Bread.” He says he had this from a bakery in New Hampshire and made his own version. His formula is as follows (The weights are my estimates. Greenstein only provides volume measurements.):



Sponge (150% hydration)


½ cup warm water (120 gms)


2 packages active dry yeast


1 ½ cups buttermilk or sour milk at room temperature (357 gms)


3 cups whole wheat flour, preferably stone ground (384 gms)


 


Dough (67% to 82% hydration, depending on am't of AP flour added)


4 tablespoons honey (84 gms)


2 tablespoons butter or shortening (24.5 gms)


2 to 3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour (266-399 gms)


2 teaspoons salt (9.24 gms)


½ cup toasted sesame seeds


Flour, for dusting work top


Oil, for greasing bowl


Additional sesame seeds, for topping (optional)


Shortening, for greasing pans


Procedures




  1. Dissolve yeast in water. Add other sponge ingredients and mix. Cover and ferment for 45 minutes.




  2. Mix dough ingredients into sponge using 2 cups AP flour. Mix and add more flour as necessary. In stand mixer, dough should clean bowl sides. Mix 8-10 minutes. Dough should be smooth and elastic.




  3. Transfer dough to oiled bowl. Cover and ferment until double.




  4. Divide dough into two equal pieces and preshape. Rest 10 minutes.




  5. Shape into pan loaves or free form.




  6. Proof until doubled. Score with 3 diagonal cuts and brush with water.




  7. Bake in pre-heated 375ºF oven 35-45 minutes.




  8. Brush again with water and cool on a rack.




 



Now, over the past year, I've been trying to find recipes that would produce the kind of Greek bread that my daughter-in-law has described having in Greece. About the first thing I learned is that the Greek word for bread is … Psomi. So, Greenstein's formula surely was for a bread of Greek origin. I gather he had no clue that he was making “Bread Bread.”


I also learned that the typical Greek village bread was always made with a sourdough and that it used whole-grain flour. Inclusion of fat – either lard or olive oil – was common, as was the addition of honey. Sesame seeds and at least some, if not all, durum flour were also commonly used.


So, looking at Greenstein's formula, I see he uses a yeasted sponge made with buttermilk or sour milk. I think it's safe to assume this was to acidify the dough to taste somewhat like sourdough would. I see Greenstein uses both AP and WW flour, but all the WW is pre-fermented. I decided to take Greenstein's recipe a step back towards it's presumed origin. More steps may follow in the future.


I also decided to apply some of what I'd learned about whole-grain bread baking from Peter Reinhart's books and used both a soaker and a levain and pre-fermented 25% of the total flour. Following Reinhart's formulas in “Whole Grain Breads,” I divided the whole wheat flour equally between a soaker at 87.5% hydration from milk and a levain at 75% hydration, with the seed culture 20% of the flour. I used my stock sourdough starter which, as it happens, is kept at 75% hydration. I also followed Reinhart's guidance and used 1.8% salt for the total dough, with some of the salt in the soaker (to inhibit enzymatic activity).


So, this is the formula I developed:


 


Levain

Wt. (gms)

Baker's %

Whole wheat flour

192

100

Water

144

75

Active starter (75% hydration)

38.5

20

Total

374.5

195

 

Soaker

Wt. (gms)

Baker's %

Whole wheat flour

192

100

Milk

168

87.5

Salt

3.35

1.7

Total

363.35

189.2

 

Final dough

Wt. (gms)

All of the levain

374.5

All of the soaker

363.35

Bread flour

384

Water

241

Honey (4 T)

84

Olive oil (2T)

24.5

Salt

10.45

Toasted sesame seeds

½ cup

Total

1481.8

 

Procedure

  1. The night before baking, mix the soaker. Cover the bowl and leave at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours. (If not then ready to mix the final dough, the soaker can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.)

  2. Mix the levain and allow to ferment until ripe (at least doubled and volume, with a domed top) – 4 to 6 hours. (This can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.)

  3. If either (or both) the levain and soaker were refrigerated, take them out to warm to room temperature (about 1 hour) before mixing the dough.

  4. Cut the levain and the soaker into about 12 pieces and put them in the bowl of a stand mixer together with the other ingredients. Mix with the paddle until they form a shaggy mass (1-2 minutes at Speed 1).

  5. Switch to the dough hook, and mix to achieve moderate gluten development. (7 minutes at Speed 2)

  6. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, cover the bowl, and ferment until increased 50% in bulk with folds at 50 minute intervals. (About 2 ½ hours)

  7. Divide the dough into two equal pieces and pre-shape into balls. Let the dough rest, covered for 10-15 minutes.

  8. Shape the pieces into boules, batards or pan loaves and place them in bannetons or pans or on a couche.

  9. Proof until increased 50% in bulk. (2 hours, 15 minutes in my kitchen at 72ºF)

  10. While the loaves are proofing, pre-heat the oven to 425ºF with a baking stone in place and your steaming method of choice. (If baking pan loaves, the stone and steaming are not necessary.)

  11. When the loaves have proofed, transfer them to a peel. Pre-steam the oven. Optionally, brush or spritz the loaves' surface with water and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Score the loaves. Traditional scoring for a boule is 3 transverse cuts. Transfer to the oven.

  12. Steam the oven, turn the temperature down to 350ºF and bake for 40-50 minutes.

  13. Transfer the loaves to a cooling rack and cool completely before slicing.

 

The crust was chewy and the crumb chewy but tender. The flavor was "sweet and sour whole wheat." It was actually pretty sour - more than my wife liked. I have made sourdough whole wheat breads before and did not enjoy the combination of whole wheat and sour flavors, but I did like this bread. This tasting was when the bread was just ... well ... almost cool. It will no doubt mellow by morning. I'm eager to taste it again after a good night's sleep.

Enjoy!

David

Submitted to YeastSpotting

 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Tartine's Shaker Lemon Pie

This recipe is adapted from the book  'Tartine'.  I have lemons overflowing and absolutely love lemons and anything made with them...I enjoy eating the rind of lemons and the pith too which is full of vitamin C...also I have read now that research says lemons help with bone loss.  I used my mandolin to slice the lemons paper thin and sugar soaked for a good 24 hours..nice tender and tasty sweet peels went into the pie baked in a tart pan.  Delicious tender peels floating in a lemony custard with a butter flaky crust sprinkled heavily with baking sugar crystals...not to tart not to sweet.


                  


 


                                             


           Sylvia


 


 


                  


 

Jon Morrison's picture
Jon Morrison

Gearing up for Farmes Market update

I am slowly getting ready for Farmers Market.  Still cooking in my home.  The commercail kitchen is still a couple of weeks away.  I have five different sourdough breads, three different flour blends.


Using Peter Reinhart's Pain au Levain, morph some into Pain ausx herbes provance using Panzy's Herb de Provence blend.


Using Peter's San Francisco recipe I use Gérard Rubaud flour blend.  Some of it morphs into a multigrain using 3/4 King Arthurs Harvest Blend and 1/4 extra poppy seeds.


I also made Reinhart's Whole Wheat sourdough.


This week Olve bread will be added to the mix.


About everyother week I bake sour dough bagels.


 


I tried to make a rye starter, but it didn't work out yet.  I'll be back working on it later this summer.


 


One thing I have found that helps male the herb bread and multigrain bread is to add these when the adding the water to the firm starter.  They get well blended in before the flour and salt are added.


 


This has been quite a journey.  With last week baking 36 loaves in five days.  Very therapeutic and fun.


 


My one worry is trying to bake in the steam convestion oven.  I read a lot of horror stories.  Any help would be get.


 


Jon Morrison


The Bread Dude


as one of my customers calls me.


 


 


 

cranbo's picture
cranbo

final hydration formula

I'm no math whiz, but I'm trying to figure out my overall hydration, and could use some help with the math.



Let's assume I have 1000g of dough
700g (70% of dough) is at 55% hydration
300g (30% of dough) is at 100% hydration (my starter)


What would my total dough hydration be?


 


 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

A Marvelous Site and Resource

There are, at least, two threads running currently whose subjects deal with "the past'":


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/18072/primitive-cooking-techniques-amp-discussions


and,


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/18097/fredk-t-vine


I am especially taken with the latter, more so with the author, than with any particular book, he wrote.  Apparently, Mr. Fredrick T. Vine, was a popular and successful author, and baker at the turn of the 19th to 20th century.  A superficial web search finds at least five bread and baking books, writings by Mr. Vine, sufficently treasured that reproductions are still sold today.


Browsing through one of his,


Practical bread-making: a useful guide for all in the trade (1900)

 By Frederick T. Vine,


here is one excerpt I found particulary chuckle-inducing, considering the "hole-i-er than thou"  point-of-view many of us share.


"HOLES IN BREAD.


IF there is one thing more annoying than another to the baker, it is to cut a handsome-looking loaf and to find it full of large, unsightly holes, especially when, as is generally the case, you desire it to cut extra nice.


This is no new thing, but has been with us to plague the bakers' life for many years, and very many schemes have been tried to banish it, but all to no purpose; it is still unfortuuately with us, and I am not sanguine enough to predict its banishment from reading this chapter. However, I will endeavour to reason it out to you, and give my own theories upon it, together with the many remedies I have tried and suggested for its cure."


Frederick T. Vine's writings, and hundreds of other culinary books are available at:


http://stommel.tamu.edu/~baum/google-fud.html


David G

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

German Style Lye Pretzel - this is more like it!


I posted a few days ago asking why my lye pretzels are not dark enough, after much reading and some experimenting, I think I figured out why. After I mixed up the lye solution, I didn't let it sit and completely dissolve, so the solution was too weak. The first time, I mixed and dipped the dough right away. This time, I mixed up a 3.5% lye solution (between 3% and 4% is good, the higher the darker, but don't go beyond 4%) with room temperature water, let the solution sit at a safe place for 15 minutes, slowly stir for the first few minutes. The solution heated up at first, then started to become clear and cooled down. After that, dip the dough for 30sec each, bingo, this time I got the color and shine I want. The devil is in the details huh?!


 


Also made some other shapes, I think they look cute with wide open scoring marks.



The recipe is from Jeffrey Hamelman's Bread, I did make one change: after reading a suggestion on the web, I used milk instead of water in the formula, I do think it tastes more authentic that way. I loved how the pretzels tasted and looked when I stayed at Germany a few years ago, crispy and hard shell, soft and chewy crumb, and a special "lye pretzel" taste. It's decidely different from American style soft pretzels boiled in baking soda solution (which I also like), good to split open and make a sandwich with. I do need to work on my shaping techniques to get rid of the unsightly holes in the crumb.



I have a whole lot of lye left, will be practicing making pretzels for a while!


chetc's picture
chetc

CInnamon rolls question

I have a recipe to make cinnamon rolls, I mix all the ingredients in my bread machine and let the dough rise then roll it out and put on the sugar cinnamon ect. roll it up cut them put them in a pan & let rise for an hour & bake,  we were invited to a picnic at a friends house, there will be 35 people there, the question I have is, can I make the dough the night before and refrigerate it right after I take it out of the bread machine, and let it come to room temp the next day and bake them to help save some time, am I taking the right approach.

    thanks
       Chet

Royall Clark's picture
Royall Clark

Bread flour

I hope this isn't too basic of a question to post. I've been baking and using the recipes from all over the web and from several books. That said I wonder why some breads call for "bread flour" and other "AP". A couple of weeks ago I bought my fist 50# sack of flour. It was a bread flour "Power Flour" from Pendleton Flour Mills. I brought the cost of my bread down a bit as it was $.55 a pound that way. This is the cheapest I've been able to buy BF. (got to remember this is Hawaii!) The only other inexpensive way to buy flour is to give up on trying to find 50# sacks of unbleached AP flour. Everywhere I ask, they only carry bleached flour. Shipping here is out of the question. So the thrust of the question I have is this... Can I use BF exclusively for all my bread baking? What are the drawbacks? Why even use AP for bread?


I know, lots of questions! Hope someone can shed some light on this for me!


Aloha,


Royall

jonswifelori's picture
jonswifelori

La Brea Bakery Sourdough Starter

I finally decided to start the grape sourdough starter from the book "Nancy Silverton's Breads from the La Brea Bakery.  My mother-in-law also wants to start it, so I have included pics of the first 40 hours of fermentation.  I did exactly what was stated in the recipe...One pound of red or black grapes (I did dark red-purple grapes), 2 pounds lukewarm water (78 degrees F), and one pound three ounces or unbleached white bread flour (I used King Arthur).  The recipe called for organic-pesticide free grapes...but my store didn't have them.  I got normal grapes, and just rinsed them under cool water.  I put them in a double layer of cheese cloth picked up from the local hardware store.  This is the pic from just 2 hours after all the ingredients were mixed.


 


P.S....I have also wrapped my little baby with a towel all over.  I peek in on it about every 2 hours.


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