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jcking's picture
jcking

Sourdough Water

My understanding is the flour provides wild yeast and the air in your local provides the bacteria for the sweet/sour of sourdough. While building the sour it is usally kept covered to prevent crusting. What if one were to leave the water, that they would use in the next refreshment, uncovered along side the sour? The uncovered water could then pick up the bacteria. My thought is it could decrease the time necessary to reach its full sour. Comments? I've been using my chef for almost 2 years so I'm not some rambling theorist, not that there's anything wrong with that.


Jim

thebreadfairy's picture
thebreadfairy

Getting Ears* (not "Grigne"): An Observation

I have the opportunity now to use steam injection in my baking. I was curious as to what effect the timing of steaming from the time of loading would have. I prepared a formula and created two identical loaves. I preheated the oven to 425º and loaded the first loaf dry with no presteam. After about 1.5 minutes, I loaded the second loaf in the same oven and steamed as soon as the oven door closed. I was amazed at the results:



The loaf on the left was the dry start loaf. There is actually a tiny bit of grigne ear* at the upper left side of the score but the score is otherwise flat. The loaf on the right started to bloom about 3 minutes into the bake and developed the gorgeous grigne ears* you can see.


My inference from this is that for maximum grigne ears*, the earlier the steaming the better. On a future bake, I will try a presteam just before loading as well as the initial loading steam to see what effect this will have. This also helps me understand one of the reasons I have had such a wide variation in the quality of my grigne ears* from bake to bake.


Hope this helps someone. Comments and questions are welcome.


*Edited on 4/8/11 to correct misuse of "grigne". The raised flap of crust is actually an "ear".


 

diverpro94's picture
diverpro94

French Date and Almond Tart

I love making tarts! It's my new obsession! I've tried a couple recipes, but this French Date and Almond Tart is my absolute favorite... Well after some recipe testing and revisions. In fact, I love it so much that I'm officially naming it my signature pastry.


 


The first time I made it was for a get well dinner for a friend. She just had major surgery and was under some pretty hefty prescription drugs when I delivered her a lasagna, a fresh loaf of pain de champagne, and a tart. She opened the box with the tart and replied, "Oh! Isn't this what they serve to the queen?" I quickly nodded my head and walked her to her chair. Too funny.


 


French Date and Almond


 


-Colby


Blog


Website

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hamelman's Pain Au Levain

This wasn't my first Pain Au levain, but surely the best of the bunch. I have baked Vermont Sourdough with increased wholewheat, and Pain Au levain with Mixed Sourdough starters...Those were not successful as i was struggling with ways to please my starter.. But i loved this one! No wonder why so many TFL members bake it frequently.


I increased hydration to 75%. I did not retard the dough, it has a lovely faint sourness. I forgot to autolyze too. I stratched and Folded in the bowl 5 times during bulk fermentation (2.5 hours). Final fermentation was almost 4 hours! This is what happens when your flour is not malted from factory.


The Doughs spread flat in the oven.. but with the help of a 500F stone and plenty of steam, they balooned and came to life..


This is by far the best sourdough i have ever had to date. Crackly crust, soft chewy crumb, and an intoxicating aroma..!!





Khalid

Maggie Lou's picture
Maggie Lou

Combining rising agents

I recently purchased Inn On the Creek ORGANIC SIX GRAIN PANCAKE MIX which has baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, and creme of tarter in the mix.  This may be an odd or even ridiculous question, but what would happen if I put a cup of this in, say a white bread recipe using yeast?


Anyone ever try this?

mdrdds's picture
mdrdds

Matzah reciepe

Passover is coming in about three weeks. I will have to put my bread baking on hold for a week. However if anyone has a recipe for matzah it would be appreciated.
Mike Robinson

Dough-No's picture
Dough-No

New Oven Recommendations

hey guys!

We will be moving into a new house very soon and will be purchasing a new oven. I want to make sure I get an oven that will work well for bread and that I can steam safely in. I am in Toronto Canada, any recommendations would be appreciated.

-D

dancer742's picture
dancer742

Honey WW Bread

I used to have a recipe for Honey WW Bread that contained molasses and honey and raised in the fridge overnight.  Any one have that recipe?  The honey, molasses, margerine was heated in water until warm.  It also called for powdered milk.  I later converted this recipe to have 12 grain cereal and sunflower seeds.  It was delicious.

ananda's picture
ananda

Weekend Baking, 26th-27th March 2011

 


A selection of breads made at home this weekend... 


•1.    BorodinskyDSCF1814


Utilising a scald, as the previous attempt; see here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22439/brief-report-young-baker-competition-and-weekend-bread-baking-home


The sour was built using 2 elaborations, with 18 hour fermentation time in between.   I started with 80g stock and ended up with 1040g of sour.


Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sour [see above]

 

 

Total Dark Rye Flour

30

360

Total Water

50

600

TOTAL

80

960

 

 

 

2. Scald

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

20

240

Malt Syrup

4.5

54

Black Strap Molasses

6

72

Coriander

1

12

Salt

1

12

Water

35

420

TOTAL

67.5

810

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

Rye Sour [from above]

80

960

Scald [from above]

67.5

810

Dark Rye Flour

23.5

282

Strong White Flour

26.5

318

TOTAL

197.5

2370

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

% hydration

85

-

 

Method:

  • Build the leaven as above. At the same time as preparing the final elaboration, 18 hours ahead of mixing the final paste, prepare the scald. Dissolve the malt, molasses and salt in the water, and bring to a rolling boil. Stir in the flour and coarsely ground coriander. Cover and leave to cool.
  • Combine scald, sour and both flours to form a paste. Bulk ferment for 1 hour.
  • Prepare a Pullman pan by lining with silicone paper. Scale 2kg of paste into the pan with wet hands, and smooth to shape. Make a "steamed pudding" with the remaining paste.
  • Proof time will be 2 - 3 hours. Bake from cold in an oven with a pan of water, raising the temperature to 160°C. Bake time of 2½ hours.
  • De-pan and cool on wires. Wrap in linen for 24 hours before slicing.DSCF1816DSCF1817DSCF1827DSCF1828

 

 

•2.    Pain au Leaven using both Rye Sour and Wheat Levain<DSCF1803/p>

Refreshment regime for rye sour is as above.   Wheat leaven also 2 elaborations, first of 8 hours, second of 4 hours.   This dough was retarded overnight and baked off the next day.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Total Strong Flour

17.9

150

Total Water

10.65

90

TOTAL

28.55

240

 

 

 

2. Rye Sour

 

 

Total Dark Rye Flour

7.1

60

Total Water

10.65

90

TOTAL

17.75

150

 

 

 

3. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

28.55

240

Rye Sour [from above]

17.75

150

Strong White Flour

75

630

Salt

1.8

15

Water

46.4

390

TOTAL

169.5

1425

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% hydration

67.7

-

 

Method:

  • Elaborate leavens as above.
  • Combine all the materials to form a dough, and mix until well-developed.
  • Bulk proof for 2 hours, then retard overnight
  • Shape and final proof for 5 hours [ I gave this maximum proof]
  • Bake with steam as 1 large loaf, for 1 hour
  • Cool on wires
  • DSCF1791DSCF1794DSCF1799 DSCF1801DSCF1806DSCF1811

•3.    Mixed Levains and Shoyu-Roasted Sunflower Seed Boule

Leaven cultures built as detailed above.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Total Flour

36.4

200

Total Water

21.8

120

TOTAL

58.2

320

 

 

 

2. Rye Sour

 

 

Total Dark Rye

8.2

45

Total Water

13.6

75

TOTAL

21.8

120

 

 

 

3. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

58.2

320

Rye Sour [from above]

21.8

120

Strong White Flour

45.4

250

Dark Rye Flour

10

55

Salt

1.6

9

Sunflower Seeds

16.4

90

Water

32.7

180

TOTAL

186.1 

1024

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

44.6

 

% hydration

68.1

 

 

Method:

  • Build the leavens.
  • Roast the sunflower seeds in shoyu under the grill, turning as necessary.
  • Combine all ingredients except the seeds and mix to form a soft dough. Develop this, then add the seeds and complete with a sequence of 4 "stretch and folds" over a 2 hour bulk proof.
  • Shape and prove in a brotform for 4 hours
  • Bake with steam for 45 minutes.
  • Cool on wires
  • DSCF1830DSCF1831

Borodinsky is for the main College Diversity Competition.

Large Boule had to be cut into prematurely, as I needed some lunch and that was the only bread available.

The Sunflower Seed bread is only just out of the oven, but straight to the freezer.   With the shoyu-roasted seeds, rye flour at nearly 20% and an ambitious 44.6% pre-fermented flour, I guess this loaf will pack a full punch in flavour.   Lovely crumb to it, for sure!

All good wishes

Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Has anyone had this happen?

Hi, Fellow TFL'ers


I'am sure many of you have baked recipes from Peter Reinhart's Wholegrain breads. Yesterday, I mixed a soaker and a BIGA for a 100% Whole wheat sandwich bread. When i woke up 8 hours later, i found that the soaker has inflated the plastic wrap to a dome.. i.e. My BIGA was outside, and the soaker was in the fridge. The BIGA was overproofed, and smelled of alcohol... What to do? My baking instincs pushed me to deflate it, shape it to a ball again, and then, freeze it..?!


The Soaker is outside now, iam at work, and the BIGA is in the freezer?! should i worry? I have not been there before.. does anyone know how many hours i need to take the BIGA out of the freezer in order for its temp. to come back to room temp..?


I'd appreciate your help..


(Edit: The BIGA is yeasted .. not sourdough)


(Edit: Added Pics: I still don't get it.. why do my panned loaves always burst at the sides.? I have shaped tightly, grease the pan well, Proofed well, steamed well..)



Here the Crumb exposes the flaws caused by the overproofed BIGA: Crumbly Texture, yet soft.



The flavor was Good.. not the best... as the alcohol produced by the excessive yeast fermentation of BIGA left an off-taste to the loaf.



In conclusion, This loaf will prove itself useful to my digestive tract... though will not please my tongue, nor my eyes..


khalid

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