The Fresh Loaf

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

A Bâtard of a weekend

I think I know at least 6 different ways of shaping bâtards. I often choose how I shape them on impulse. This weekend, I decided to be a bit more reflective and consciously chose 3 variations to try. I think I gained better control over bâtard shaping as a result.

I made two loaves of Hamelman's Pain au Levain from “Bread” and two loaves of my San Joaquin Sourdough.

The first loaf was shaped using one of the methods learned from the San Francisco Baking Institute. I can't recall seeing this method demonstrated elsewhere.

Pain au Levain from Hamelman's "Bread," shaped using Method 1.

Method 1

  1. Pre-shape as a log. Rest 20 minutes, seam side up, covered.

  2. Place the piece on the board with one short side closest to you. De-gas.

  3. Take the far edge and fold it towards you about 1/3 of the length of the piece. Seal the seams.

  4. Fold the left side 1/3 of the way towards the middle and seal the seams. Repeat for the right side.

  5. Starting with the far end, roll the piece towards you, sealing the seam with the edge or heel of your hand at each turn. Seal the final seam well.

  6. Turn the loaf seam side down and roll it to even out the shape and achieve the desired length.

This method is suitable to make a bâtard with a fat middle and little tapering, as pictured.

Pain au Levain from Hamelman's "Bread," shaped using Method 2.

Method 2

  1. Pre-shape as a log. Rest 20 minutes, seam side up, covered.

  2. Place the piece on the board with a wide side closest to you. De-gas.

  3. Fold the far side to the middle. Seal the seam.

  4. Rotate the piece 180º.

  5. Fold the far side 2/3 of the way towards you. Seal the seam.

  6. Grasp the far edge and bring it all the way over the piece, to the board and seal the seam. (Essentially, this is the method traditionally used to shape baguettes.)

  7. Turn the loaf seam side down and roll it to even out the shape and achieve the desired length.

This method makes a longer, thinner loaf with more tapered ends.

The two loaves of Pain au Levain after shaping and scoring - ready to bake. Note that these loaves were of identical weight.

San Joaquin Sourdoughs, both shaped using Method 3.

Method 3

  1. Pre-shape as a ball. Rest 20 minutes, seam side up, covered.

  2. Place the piece on the board. De-gas.

  3. Proceed as in Method 2, steps 3 through 7.

This method results in a loaf similar to that from using Method 2, except a bit thicker in the middle. It solves a problem I have had shaping bâtards with higher-hydration doughs with excessive extensibility. They tend to get too long and thin as I shape them, even before the final rolling out. Starting with a round piece of dough, rather than a log, helps me get the shape I want.  

Thanks for listening.

Happy Baking!

David

IndyRose's picture
IndyRose

Peanut butter bread?

I used to have a peanut butter bread recipe for the bread machine and have misplaced it.  Looked up some on internet and so far they didn't seem the same as I remembered.  Think it used chunky and it was about 2/3 cup or more.  Any favorites out there?

Ryan Sandler's picture
Ryan Sandler

Ciabatta Quest: Weeks 2 and 3 - the Adventure Continues!

Well, I quite failed to get around to blogging last weeks' ciabatta attempt, and now here it's Saturday and I have another bake to describe.  

Last week I made another stab at SteveB's double hydration ciabatta.  If you recall in week 1, I got very nice flavor and crust, but an unimpressive crumb.  I also found the process, which involves almost 30 minutes of mixing, rather cumbersome.  The first time I modified Steve's process to add a French fold halfway through the rise, and I figured this time I either needed to modify the recipe more, or stick strictly to Steve's directions.  I went for the latter, cutting down the mixing time, and adding 2 stretch-and-folds to the rise.  The results, however, were quite similar to week 1:

 

 

Crumb was perhaps a little better, flavor a little worse.  So much for modifications.

Anyway, this week I took a shot at Craig Ponsford's ciabatta, as interpreted by Maggie Glezer, as interpreted by these two blogs (the first has better directions, the latter had weight measurements).  This formula involves a very stiff biga with a little bit of whole grain and just the teensiest bit of yeast, which is fermented for a full 24 hours (28 in my case).  Hydration is just north of 80%, and it takes 4 stretch and folds to make it behave.  

The results, however, were phenomenal

And here's the kicker:

 

You may notice the loaf on the right is a little funky looking--it stuck to the couch a bit, and I failed to get it all on the parchment when flipping it over, and so I had to manhandle it a bit to clear the couche and slip a scrap of parchment underneath.  

As you can see, nicely caramelized crust (nice and crispy too), crumb wonderfully open (nicely chewy too), and the flavor...oh the flavor.  This was one of the best tasting breads I have made, period.  The combination of a big dose of poolease-y nuttiness, a tinge of sour, and notes of whole grain in the background was just heavenly.  

I think this formula is a keeper.  Beyond getting fabulous results on this occasion, I enjoyed making it.  I like doing stretch-and-folds, feeling the dough and watching it mature and come together.  Even if it gets the same results, I'd take a recipe with stretch-and-folds over one with none and a long mixer time any day.  Just a matter of personal taste there.

There's still some work to do--I still need to work out my flipping technique, and I still have some kinks to work out in the formula itself, in order to get the exterior shape more even (enough kinks that I'm going to refrain from posting my take on the formula just yet).  But this is a positive step for sure!

Happy baking, everyone,

-Ryan 

ds99302's picture
ds99302

Just testing (semi-annual Danish pastry bonanza)

kimemerson's picture
kimemerson

shape before ferment, or ferment then shape?

Hello all,

 I've been using Dan Leader's "Local Breads" and while I've had some good results, I've also had some problems. Most have to do with typos and errors, such as a baker's % sayingi it's 32% but when you do the math on the actual weights it's more like 130%. In that case it turns out the % was correct, not the weights. And there has been more than one error. So I am cautious about what I read and always have an eye to what changes I might have to make on my own. I also recognize that the focus audience is more likely a home baker and not a professional. I sort of fall in the middle in that I don't bake like a home baker but I don't do it professionally either.

   One recipe calls for shaping the dough into flutes and then refrigerating the flutes for 12-24 hours. My question is, why is it necessary to shape and refrigerate as opposed to bulk refrigerate and shape just before proofing? My experience has been that with the shaped flutes on a floured couche or parchment, it all sticks eventually. The recipe also calls for removing the shaped flutes 2 hours before baking. The combination of the sticking flutes and what appears to be prolonged time out in the open, contribute to over proofed and collapsed flutes. I intend to try it differently this weekednd, by bulk proofing in the refigerator for 12 -24 hours, mostly depending on my schedule, and then shaping the flutes and proofing them right there. But I don't expect to proof for more than an hour, 45 minutes shpuld do it. Any thoughts?

   Thanks,

Kim

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Finnish Rye Bread - not much rye, but lots of other goodies

 

The formula is from Wild Yeast's blog, there really isn't that much rye in the dough, but has quite a lot of ww flour, as well as cracked wheat and flax seeds - two of my favoriate bread add-ins. The addition of molasses adds a subtle sweetness, makes a very flavorful and satisfying whole grain bread.

 

Crumb is relatively open for such a dough, not difficult to make either. With the method of "baking upside down", you can even skip scoring!

 

This is probably my shortest, least wordy blog entry ever, but when you have a perfect formula, no need for more words, thank you Susan!

Sending this to Yeastspotting.

ananda's picture
ananda

Baking with All-British Flour

 

DSCF2125Baking with All-British FlourDSCF2144

Given that Rye Flour is not so common in UK shops as Wheat Flour, when one finds it, it is far more likely to be of British origin, and often, Organic too.   The Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour from a Welsh watermill is now the only flour I use to keep my rye sourdough culture properly fed.   It is very dark, coarse, highly fermentable and thirsty, and produces breads of outstanding flavour.   The Doves Farm Organic Light Rye is less impressive in these areas, but, its performance in producing a better dough structure is undeniable.

DSCF2131DSCF2132

I'm trying to work towards using my local miller as a source for all the wheatflour I use at home.   It means karting 7kg of flour at a time on the train back home, but I am feeling the need to move away from relying on industrially-milled flour, and come up with exceptional bread quality on all levels, using locally-grown organic flour from traditional sources.   I achieved mixed success with this round of baking, but have produced much that I am very happy with, and a clear direction of the changes needed to induce improvement, and ultimately, fulfilment in the project.

DSCF2127DSCF2129

•1.    All-British flour and 2 LeavensDSCF2138

Here is the formula for a bread dough raised with 2 leavens, and using only British Organic flour from traditional sources.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sour Elaboration 1

 

 

Stock Rye Sourdough

 

20

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

 

60

Water

 

100

TOTAL

 

180

 

 

 

2. Wheat Levain Elaboration 1

 

 

Stock Wheat Levain

 

54

Gilchesters Organic Pizza Flour

 

100

Water

 

60

TOTAL

 

214

 

 

 

3. Rye Sour Elaboration 2

 

 

Elaboration 1 [above]

 

180

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

 

150

Water

 

250

TOTAL

29.63

580

 

 400g retained

180g returned to stock

4. Wheat Levain Elaboration 2

 

 

Elaboration 1 [above]

 

214

Gilchesters Organic Pizza Flour

 

200

Water

 

120

TOTAL

35.56

534

 

 480g retained

54g returned to stock

5. FINAL DOUGH

 

 

Rye Sourdough [above, 3.]

29.63

[11.11flour, 18.52water]

400

Wheat Levain [above, 4]

35.56

[22.22flour, 13.34water]

480

Gilchesters Organic Pizza Flour

48.15

650

Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

18.52

250

Salt

1.2

16

Water

38.14

515

TOTAL

171.2

2311

Overall % Pre-fermented Flour

33.3

 

Overall % Hydration

70

 

 

Method:

  • Elaboration One on Saturday evening, 19:00. Elaboration Two Sunday morning 09:00
  • Dough mixed Sunday 17:00. Initial Bulk Proof for 2½ hours. Retard overnight.
  • Divide and shape 08:00 Monday. Set to prove in Bannetons
  • After cutting, bake using steam and masonry at 13:00
  • Cool on wires.

DSCF2124DSCF2139DSCF2137DSCF2143

 

Notes:

  • Too much pre-fermented flour, all-told in the formula. The rye sour needed rescuing, but was good by the time of dough mixing, and added at the right quantity. The wheat leaven was too ripe, and too much added. There is need to take account of the greater ash content in this flour; even though it is labelled "Pizza/Ciabatta" flour, it can hardly be described as "00"! The colour is a greyish white.
  • I did not want to retard overnight, but had little choice. The rye sour needed some care and attention. As a result the wheat leaven was over-ripe, and it was early evening, so I had to retard, rather than stay up until 4 in the morning!
  • I miscalculated the salt! At 1.8% on flour, there should have been just over 24g added. This is extremely significant in terms of the dough performance.
  • I adjusted the water level upward, only slightly, but feel 70% is the best proportion of water to be adding to this flour
  • Some information from the flour bags is attached in photographic form. Please do not take any notice of the claim that this is "Strong" flour. High protein [and mineral content], most certainly. High in gluten forming proteins, definitely not! Personally, I wish this claim had never been included in the marketing of this flour. It may well cause numerous customers to be seriously put-off from buying in the future. I want to learn how to make good bread with this flour, and I know it does not possess some of the properties most often associated with strong bread flour. However, I know it is possible, and now know and understand the significance of the notes I have listed above.
  • I have been further reflecting on the use of utterly untreated flour. Thus creating a thoroughly different animal for the baker to deal with. How to up the ante, and increase skill and knowledge levels to retain control of the fermentation and dough development when adding in all the further variables of a less consistent performance in the flour. This is to be the new "bar" to jump over.
  • Onward and upward in the future!

 

 

•2.    BorodinskyDSCF2149

Once rescued, I gave the rye sour dough one further elaboration, prepared a scald, and readied myself to make a large batch of this paste; very nearly 4kg...by hand!

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough [elab 3]

 

 

Stock after Elaboration 2

 

180

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

 

532.5

Water

 

887.5

TOTAL

80 [30flour, 50water]

1600

Note: further leftover for stock

 

[80]

 

 

 

2. Scald

 

 

Doves Farm Organic Light Rye Flour

20

400

Organic Barley Malt Syrup

4.5

90

Organic Blackstrap Molasses

6

120

Coriander [ground fresh]

1

20

Salt

1

20

Boiling Water

35

700

TOTAL

67.5

1350

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from above]

80

1600

Scald [from above]

67.5

1350

Doves Farm Organic Light Rye Flour

17.5

350

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

12.5

250

Gilchesters Organic Pizza Flour

20

400

TOTAL

197.5

3950

Overall Pre-fermented Flour

30

 

Overall Hydration

85

 

 

Method:

  • Give 3rd elaboration to rye sourdough and leave to ferment through for 14 hours. At the same time make the scald. Add molasses and malt syrup to boiled water in a pan and return to the boil. Pour this onto the flour, salt and coriander and mix to form a stiff, gelatinised paste. Cover well, and leave to cool overnight.
  • Mix the final paste by combining the liquid sour with the stiff scald. Add the remaining flour and form a paste. See photographs for texture.
  • Bulk prove 1 hour, then scale and mould into tins using wet hands to shape.
  • Proof for 3 - 4 hours before baking in a moderate oven for 2 hours and upwards
  • Cool on wires
  • Note that I made one loaf in a Pullman Pan scaled off at 2kg, one loaf in "Farmhouse" tin, scaled off at 1.3kg, with the residual 650g proved in a small brotform, although it did, sadly, stick somewhat!

Photographs of the finished loaves are all attached.

DSCF2121DSCF2116DSCF2135DSCF2147DSCF2154

Best wishes to you all

Andy

andythebaker's picture
andythebaker

Brioche Feuilletee

has anyone seen this?  or, more importantly, has anyone made anything similar to this?

 

http://www.parispatisseries.com/2011/05/03/la-patisserie-des-reves-brioche-feuilletee/

 

i especially love the crumb shot.  i saw that and just had to share.

 

i've made plenty of brioche dough in my life, but i've never thought to laminate it further with butter!  and... is it laminated with sugar in some folds too?  the person describing the pastry talks of a carmelized flavor.

 

~andrew

 

 

anitasanger's picture
anitasanger

I fed rye to a very inactive white starter and it literally skyrocketed overnight.

I fed rye to a very inactive white starter and it literally skyrocketed overnight. It is about 3 weeks old, i've been keeping at room temp and feeding twice a day. I've had bubbles the whole time, but NO rise and fall. On a whim I feed it rye just for kicks. The next morning it had tripled in size. I fed it rye again today and it tripled in size in 2 hours. So, when making bread with this using white flour, will it taste like white sourdough? Also, why did the rye boost so much life into this starter? I'm amazed.

gringogigante's picture
gringogigante

DIY Mustard - part II anyone have any recipes?

I can surf the net, but anyone have any favorite mustard recipes? As in recipes for making mustard, not recipes with mustard in them.

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