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breadsong's picture
breadsong

Apple Bread

Hello,  I wanted to try making Apple Bread again, after seeing Larry's recent Odds and Ends post (thank you Larry) (and because I was able to find Honeycrisp apples at the market!).



I made this bread combining elements of Mr. Hamelman's Normandy Apple Bread, and Mr. Kastel's Apple Bread. With many thanks to Mr. Hamelman and Mr. Kastel!
I wanted to try mixing the final dough without water, to try and get as much apple flavor as possible in the bread
(apple cider, applesauce, and sour cream stand in for the water).



Apple Bread     2000 Desired Dough Weight in grams       <----      
               
             
  Baker's Percentages Weights Baker's  
Ingredients Dough Stiff Levain Dough Stiff Levain Total %  
               
Bread flour 0.9 1 738 159 897 92%  
Red Fife 75% whole-wheat 0.1   82   82 8%  
Water   0.6   96 96 9.8%  
Apple cider (60g+80g+270g) 0.50   410   410 41.9%  
Applesauce (Transparent apples) 0.17   137   137 7.0% est 50% water
Sour cream 14%BF 0.19   158   158 11.5% est 71.5% water
Osmotolerant instant yeast 0.01   4.00   4 0.4%  
Salt 0.023   18.79   19 1.9%  
Sourdough Starter   0.20   32 32    
Stiff Levain 0.35   287        
Dried apples (Honeycrisp)  0.2   165   165    
               
Total 2.438 1.8 2000 287 2000    



Mix levain, ferment 12 hours at room temperature (70-72F,until doubled).

Pour a couple of Tablespoons of liquid (more cider, or a liqueur, brandy, or?) over dried apples to rehydrate them a bit. Set aside.
Hold back 60g apple cider.
Blend sour cream and 80g apple cider. Gradually warm in microwave.
If applesauce is really chunky, break it up a bit (I used a pastry blender to do this).
Blend applesauce and 270g apple cider. Gradually warm in microwave.
Blend sour cream and applesauce mixtures. Test temperature (95F).
Blend in stiff levain, whisk until smooth.
In separate bowl, combine flours and yeast. Add liquids to flours and yeast. Mix to combine, then mix in salt.
Work dough to improved mix.
Warm remaining cider to 90F, add to dough and mix in.
Warm dried apples if they are cool; I gently warmed them 15 seconds in microwave.
Spread dough out on counter, sprinkle dried apples over, jelly roll and knead until dried apple is well distributed.

Bulk Ferment, 80F, for 3 to 3.5 hours; stretch and fold at 1 and again at 2 hours.

Divide, preshape, rest 20 minutes, shape, retard overnight in fridge, preheat oven to 460F, bake 10 minutes, reduce heat to 425F, bake until done (depending on loaf size). Tent bread with foil while baking if it's browning too quickly.

 

I made two different batches. I learned from the first batch:
- I used way too much yeast (BP 1%). The dough fermented too quickly! I reduced to .4% BP in the second batch.
- I found the dough a bit stiff after mixing and didn't do a great job mixing in the dried apple (uneven distribution of apple shows up in the crumb shots below, from two different loaves). For the second batch, I tried double-hydration, to get some gluten and then soften the dough with the addition of a second amount of liquid. The dough was easier to spread out, I was able to "jelly-roll" the apple pieces and knead them in much more easily.
- Not moistening the dried apples before adding, I think caused them to pull water out of the dough during bulk fermentation; the dough seemed dry and I found it harder to shape. I splashed a bit of extra cider over the dried apples for the second batch and this helped.
- Transparent apple applesauce contributed great flavor to this bread. Had enough left over to make a second batch. :^)
- A sweeter sparkling apple juice didn't translate to a better tasting bread, to my taste; in the second batch, I used apple cider which was not as sweet and I liked the flavor of the bread better:

These were from the first batch (the "P" is for Pomme, a nod to Normandy!).
The kitchen smelled like extremely apple-y after the bake!!!:


Here is a picture of a loaf from the second batch (trying for apple branches and leaves with the scoring):



In drying the apples, I was curious what the yield would be.
For the second batch, 5 apples = 1200 g weight, then 860g after peeling, coring, dicing, then 165g after drying (the apple flavor concentrated quite well, and yummy caramelization happening here and there!):


While dicing the apple, I tossed the pieces with lemon juice so they wouldn't brown too quickly before making it into the oven.
I dried the apples on two baking sheets, in a reducing oven:
380F convection for 10 minutes, stir, (at 10 minutes, the smell of baking apple starts to fill the kitchen!)
380F convection for 10 minutes, stir
320F convection for 10 minutes, stir
275F convection for 15 minutes, check to see how they're drying
275F convection for 10 more minutes

 

I really loved the flavor of the bread in both batches, but in the second batch the bread had a bit more tang that complemented the sweetness of the apples.  The crumb is nice and soft. In the end, I got the apple flavor I hoped for!

Happy baking everyone! from breadsong

 

 

 

varda's picture
varda

Russian Coriander Rye


First I should say that this bread is around as Russian as I am, which is maybe some.  Months ago, I bookmarked Lief's interpretaton of Breadnik's interpretation of Russian Coriander Rye.   This is my interpretation.   Original posts are here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/18561/breadnik039s-russian-coriander-rye-levain and here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/keyword/russian-corianderrye.    I followed Lief in going with a purely levain version, and used the same ingredients (mostly) albeit in different proportions.   And also modified the times by a lot.   It's cooling on the counter now, so I don't know how it will taste, but the smell (as always with rye) is heavenly.   It's also a treat to cook with coriander, which fills the kitchen with a marvelous aroma when it's crushed.  This dough is very high hydration (95%) and fairly high proportion of rye (60%) but actually quite easy to work with.   Here is my formula and method:



Russian Coriander Rye baked on Jan 28, 2011      
           
Starter 67% starter     first feeding  second feeding           total  
starter seed 30        plus 10 hrs   plus 6 hrs  
KABF 18     18 15%
Dark Rye   30 70 100 85%
water 12 30 70 112  
                        
total grams       230  
           
  Final dough                Starter            Percents
High gluten 150   15.0   23.5%
Dark Rye 350   83.5   61.6%
Spelt 105       14.9%
water 400   93.5   95%
total starter / flour in starter 192       14%
salt 15       2.1%
coriander 7        
honey 82        
molasses 51        
vegetable oil 40        
hydration of starter         95%
Estimated pounds of bread 1584   3.15    
           
           
Mix all ingredients but starter and salt     plus 20 min    
Add salt and starter     plus 1 hour    
S&F     plus 1 hour    
S&F and shape into boule, preheat DO to 500, place upside down in brotform     plus 45 min    
Spritz, slash and sprinkle with cracked coriander seeds.  Reduce heat to 450 and lower loaf into DO and put in oven with top     plus 15 min    
Reduce heat to 400     plus 15 min    
remove top     plus 35 min    

A few notes about this:   I don't really understand what dark rye is.   Is it  just another way to say whole rye, or actually a different grain?  I've never baked with this before.    I used Sir Lancelot for the high gluten flour.   I wonder if this is what made the dough so easy to work with, even with the high hydration and the high rye content.   I fermented the first build of the starter overnight, and then the second for 6 hours.   Four hours after the second elaboration it looked like this:  

This looked plenty fermented but it still had what I would term a fresh grassy smell.   Two hours later, the fresh smell was gone, but it hadn't really switched to a ripe sour one either.   So I probably could have let this go a little longer, but it did seem to have plenty of rising power.    I baked in a Dutch Oven which I don't usually do, not because the dough was so slack (it wasn't) but just because I was baking a boule, and it's a little easier to skip all the steaming and so forth.   Now I'm just waiting for breakfast.

And the crumb:

This is a very highly flavored bread.   The coriander alone makes you sit up and notice. I thought with 7 grams it would be hardly perceptible.  Crust is crunchy and overall bread texture is substantial but not heavy.    This is quite delicious and certainly a change from the ryes I've been making.    Next time I might decrease the sweeteners.   

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Lardy Cake - plus a Chinese pastry that shares some similar traits


 


Another yummy loaf from Dan Lepard's "A Handmade Loaf". According to Wiki:


"Lardy cake, also known as Lardy bread, Lardy Johns, Dough cake and Fourses cake is a traditional rich spiced form of bread originating in Wiltshire in the South West of England, which has also been popular throughout the West Country and in Oxford and Suffolk.


The main ingredients are freshly rendered lard, flour, sugar, spices, currants and raisins."


As I was reading this and the formula on how it's shaped, I was struck by how similar it is to some Chinese traditional pastries. Lard was the main fat in Chinese cooking for a long time. In fact, I have fond memories of lots of traditional foods such as "lard veggie rice", "lard sugar pastries", "lard sticky rice cake", etc.  In another word, I am not "lard-phobic" like some, in fact, I probably like my pork and pork fat as much as Homer Simpson!


The recipe is pretty quick and easy since it's mostly raised by dry yeast, with some white starter to boost flavor. My only changes are: to use instant dry yeast rather than fresh, and 100% starter rather than 80% in the book.


Lardy Cake (Adapted From "A Handmade Loaf")


bread flour, 500g


salt, 10g


white starter (100%), 220g


water, 230g


instant dry yeast, 5g


lard, 150g, thin slices


powder sugar, 150g


nutmeg & powdered sugar to springkle on top



1. mix flour, salt, starter, water, autolyse, mix until smooth


2. bulk rise at room temp (70F - 77F) for 1.5 hours until double


3. roll out into rectangle, thickness about 1/2inch, spread lard pieces on 2/3 of the rectangle, then spread sugar on top.



4. fold the uncovered 1/3 to on top of the middle 1/3



5. fold to the left again to encase all of the fillings. press to seal



6. turn 90 degrees, roll out, and do the same letter fold again



7. put in a cool place (I put in fridge) for 30min to relax


8. roll out into a rectangle again, then roll up from the long side like a jelly roll




9. cut in the middle, roll one of them into a spiral, cut side up



10. put in a 10inch round mold, and continue the spiral with the other half of the dough, cut side up.



11. cover and rise until double, about 1 hour at 77F.


12. springkle with nutmeg and more sugar


13. bake at 400F for 20min, then 350 for 40min


14. cool in pan for 15min then cool on rack. some lard will leak out, I have seen instructions saying to cool the bread upside down so lard can be absorbed back into the loaf, if you want maximum lard impact, it's worth a try.


 



 


You must like the taste of lard in order to like this bread, I love it! However, it does need to be reheated (<1min in microwave will do) before eating, the combo of lard and sugar is heavenly when warm. When cold, it's just too greasy.



 


It reminds me of a childhood favorite: "lard sugar pastry", also full of lard, laminated, with sugar inside, burned my mouth many times eating it, but I couldn't wait for it to cool. But that pastry didn't have yeast, it was more like a danish dough.



 


Who knew English and Chinese foods are so similar? :P



 


Just to compare, here's some Chinese laminated pastries(抹茶酥) using lard as fat (no yeast), the filling here is red bean paste. I added matcha powder (green tea) in the dough, so they are green.




proth5's picture
proth5

Formula Development III - The Return of the Tribbles

 It was 1967 when the classic Star Trek episode "The Trouble with Tribbles" was first broadcast.  As I mentioned before, it was a different time and I was not yet the worldly sophisticate that I am today.  "Quadrotriticale" seemed like a wonderful, fictional, impossible grain of the future.


When I discovered that triticale (trit ih KAY lee) was indeed a real grain, it immediately became my "favorite" for no other reason than it reminded me that the "impossible" could become real.


Unfortunately, according to the University of Wisconsin, its desirability for bread making is less than that of wheat (but more than that of rye!) and my own first experience with it bore that out.


But it remains my favorite and after my long baking/milling hiatus this panned bread project seemed like the ideal time to resume my obsession with this grain.  How, exactly, to use it was the question.


So I put my tiny mind to work bringing together bits and pieces of what I learned in the past year.  Given that the gluten quality in triticale is low and given that a pre ferment (particularly a firm pre ferment) can be used to help increase gluten strength, it seemed that I should use triticale in the pre ferment. So after coming home from work (which involves things like full body scans) I fired up the mighty Diamant. I did a three pass grind to produce sufficient whole grain triticale flour to pre ferment 10% of the total flour.  Why 10%?  No reason except that I had liked the 5% pre ferment bread and was determined to push it just a little bit more.  I decided to stay with a levain based pre ferment (as it had survived last week's elimination round) and to reduce the yeast very slightly to make up for a higher percentage of flour pre fermented.


Triticale handles like rye, but more so.  The 60% hydration pre ferment felt and acted like modeling clay.  After 10 hours it did not appear to be mature, but when I poked it around a little, it had expanded slightly and showed pockets of air.  If it had been wheat or if I were counting on the pre ferment for all the leavening in the bread, I would have been alarmed, but I was just doing this for taste and perhaps a little increase in strength, so I went ahead and mixed the dough.  It was tacky, not sticky and in general was a lovely dough to work with.


My feverish formula fussing had caused me to slightly increase the amount of total flour from the original recipe, but once shaped and put into pans, I realized that the pan sizes that served me well up until now were no match for this version.  It rose like gangbusters, both during proofing and in the oven.


So here is a picture of the loaf and the crumb, revealing tragic shaping flaws, the results of too small a pan, and a fine grained crumb (as I told you - brown loaf - fine crumb.) I do admire those folks with the presence of mind to take pictures during the process, but even when faced down with a scary pre ferment I still lack the verve it takes to document it pictorially.


Little Brown Loaf


Little Brown Crumb


It was - delicious.  I always sample my loaves, but frankly I'm baking a lot of different types of things these days (I am working on other things besides this panned bread) and if I let myself just eat what I wanted, well, I would be twice the person I am now and I'm not sure that would be good.  But this stuff was too good to not eat.  It is a very soft bread perfect for those (deadly, I am told) soft bread sandwiches, but also very tasty just plain and extra good toasted.


The formula: (All of last week's warnings apply...)


 


Total Dough Wt

 

62.478

oz

Levain

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients

 

 

Percent of Flour in Levain

0.1

 

Final Dough

 

 

 

%

Wt

UOM

%

WT

UOM

Ingredients

Wt

UOM

Total Flour

1

27

oz

1

2.7

oz

Total Flour

24.3

oz

KA AP Flour

0.9

24.3

oz

 

 

 

KA AP Flour

24.3

oz

Triticale Flour

0.1

2.7

 

1

2.7

oz

 

 

 

Levain Water

0.06

1.62

 

0.6

1.62

oz

 

 

 

Rolled Oats

0.17

4.59

oz

 

 

 

Rolled Oats

4.59

oz

Steel Cut Oats

0.11

2.97

oz

 

 

 

Steel Cut Oats

2.97

oz

Boiling water

0.74

19.98

oz

 

 

 

Boiling water

19.98

oz

Shortening(leaf lard)

0.04

1.08

oz

 

 

 

Shortening(leaf lard)

1.08

oz

Molasses

0.112

3.024

oz

 

 

 

Molasses

3.024

oz

Milk Powder

0.04

1.08

oz

 

 

 

Milk Powder

1.08

oz

Salt

0.028

0.756

oz

 

 

 

Salt

0.756

oz

Yeast

0.006

0.162

oz

 

 

 

Yeast

0.162

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seed

0.008

0.216

oz

0.08

0.216

oz

Levain

4.536

oz

Totals

2.314

62.478

oz

1.68

4.536

oz

 

62.478

 

 

Combine the two types of oats, boiling water, milk powder and shortening.  Allow to cool to lukewarm. 

Add the salt, molasses, yeast, levain, and flour.  Mix 5 minutes on the single speed of the spiral mixer. Or use your preferred method of mixing.

Let rise until doubled - 2 hours at 78-80F.  Fold.  Let rise again - about 2 hours 78-80F.  (Note the change - this one really needed the warmth to get it going!)

Shape and place in greased pans.  Proof (1 hour) and bake at 375F for 40 minutes.  Remove from pans and cool on a rack.

 

In a previous life I studied with a costume designer (actually, quite a famous one) who once told me that you keep adding until you think you have added enough and then - add one more thing.  So I am now faced with a decision about the direction of my experimenting.  Not only is triticale my favorite grain, but it really added a dimension to this bread.  Do I push the percentage ever higher?  Or do I call enough, enough and start tweaking other aspects of the formula?  Life is pretty good when those are the kind of decisions you get to make. Stay tuned.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Miche amongus

With all of the attention on the Miche breads of various members, I was motivated to try the one dmsnyder posted on. I was taken by the flavor comments and the use of toasted wheat germ. I took a stab at replicating the high extraction flour David used by combining 25% whole wheat flour with 75% Better For Bread (my stock AP). I use the fresh ground WW from Organic Wheat Products (flourgirl51) which is stone ground. She offers it ground fine but I have been using the more course ground product which you can see in the bread. David's photos seem to indicate a finer grind which would make the dough less speckled. Perhaps I'll run some of my WW through the mill to take it down a step in particle size. I think this would be a great excuse to order some Golden Buffalo high extraction flour.


I also took Davids suggestion with oven temperature and pre heated at 500F then lowered to 440F after loading and steaming. The vents were blocked for the first 20 minutes then opened for another 45 minutes. As you see, the crust is quite boldly baked. The areas of expansion are a lovely golden color. The singing is quite pronounced as would be expected with such a well colored loaf.


I think the next time I make this bread, I'll scale it up to 2kilo's as David suggested and shape it more oval. My dough weighed 1240 grams before baking and just 1002 grams after cooling for 30 minutes. The internal temperature was 205F when I pulled it from the stone. Normally I would dry out the crust by opening the door slightly after the oven had been shut down. In this case I thought the 65 minute bake was ample time in the oven to harden the crust.


I'm waiting for later in the day to slice this bread with dinner. Hopefully it will pare well with chicken piccata as bruchetta. I'll try to post a crumb shot later.


ADDED CRUMB SHOT AND COMMENTS:


First I have to say this bread has taken me to a place I have not been before. Such simple ingredients are blended with time and careful handling to create a most wonderful eating experience. This is one of those times where the sum is greater than the parts. I believe David mentioned thinking that he thought the deep flavor was coming from the crust but in fact the soft, chewy crumb has this flavor all on its own. I don't profess to understand why the addition of a small amount of toasted wheat germ makes this flavor so unique (I'm guessing that's it) but I'm sold. Everyone loved the rich flavor of the crumb. The crust was shattering as I cut it, pieces flying everywhere even after 6 hours of cooling. My wife was not as fond of the crispy, crunchy crust on her teeth but the dog was happy to relieve her of the trimmed edges. I had made some dark turkey broth earlier in which I dunked some chunks of this miche. A perfect melding of flavors if I do say so. Just wonderful!


We ate the bread with dinner of chicken piccata and a tomato and onion salad with my custom dressing of abundant Gorgonzola cheese and spices. The salad is a bold side dish but believe me the bread held its own with the lemon from the piccata and also the garlic/onion/cheese dressing. A wonderful meal.


I might like to try this slightly less boldly baked for the general public. I do think the over all awesomeness (is that a word?) of this bread will be enhanced by baking as a larger loaf. I would love to make a huge 8 pounder. If only I can find a way to bake it. Hmmmm.







 

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Soft Butter Rolls for Australia Day barbeque

It's Australian Day and it's the day when Aussies celebrate with things we love, barbeque, beer and lamington (?). We didn't plan to do any BBQ gatherings but ended up with one.


I only knew about the BBQ 5-6 hours in advance and decided to bring some fresh butter rolls to the barbie. Given the tight timeframe, straight-dough is the only option. I chose the soft butter rolls recipe from Jeffrey Hamelman's Bread cookbook. The rolls can be done in about 3 hours which worked out nicely with the limited time.


I also sprinkle grated Parmesan on the rolls before the bake and brush the hot rolls with melted butter. The rolls were a hit. They were soft and relatively rich with butter, milk and egg in them. Parmesan also added nice aroma and sharp cheese flavour. It was a great accompaniment to the barbeque dinner.


For more details and photo you can click on below link:


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/2011/01/soft-butter-rolls-australian-day-barbie.htm



Yummy bread rolls, with sprinkled Parmesan and black sesame seeds


 



The bread rolls with a view of Melbourne CBD


 


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com


 

azelia's picture
azelia

High Percentage of Fats in Bread

hi Everyone


this is the first time posting on here and i'm hoping that some expericence bakers will be able give an idea on this question of mine, I've asked on another forum but got no answers.


The link below is for a Dan Lepard's recipe of some Soft Baps (Bread Rolls) which contain some butter, 75g butter to 815g of flour.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2007/oct/06/recipes.foodanddrink


The method of these baps of making up the sponge leaving it for a couple of hours and then adding the liquid fat to it has got me wondering about doing the recipe this way around?

Is it because of the amount of fat in the recipe and that will inhibit gluten development? so you start the gluten to develop before adding the fat?


I read in the How Baking Works book that fat can stop gluten development by stopping the wheat absorbing the water therefore halting the process...which is what makes me wonder that this recipe is constructed this way to compensate for that?


In the past when I've asked why make a Sponge for a bread recipe I've been told is to add flavour to the bread...but wondered if it's also to do with the gluten development?


would that make sense...or am I going down the wrong pathway?

varda's picture
varda

Wondering about crackly crust

The other day I had a bread disaster.   First of all my loaves were too big and twinned with each other.   Second I preheated the oven to 500F meaning to turn it down after I put the loaves in, but didn't.   Third, I forgot to set the timer when I removed the steam pans, so I actually have no idea how long they baked in total - but suffice it to say too long.   Teach me to bake when there's too much activity around me.  Anyhow, when I removed these sad, sad loaves from the oven, the crust crackled like crazy.   I find this very frustrating because I haven't been able to do this on purpose.   The last time I had crackly crust was when I baked with King Arthur French Style flour, and I had just assumed it was a function of the flour.   The monster loaves were made with KA All Purpose which is what I usually use, so I'm mystified.  Does anyone out there understand the knobs to turn to get crackly crust not including what I did?    Thanks.  -Varda

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

UPDATE: The Bread Challenge!

Hi,


  It's been awhile, but 'The Bread Challenge', is cranking right along and new members joining on a regular basis.  For those that do not know what this is, the home page is http://www.glacierboats.com/the-bread-challenge.  As shown on our web page, the following is what The Bread Challenge is all about:


"Similar to other bread baking challenges, we are a group of enthusiastic amateur and professional bakers of artisan breads ...coming together to bake our way through Jeffrey Hamelman's landmark work, Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes."


If this sounds interesting to you, then please allow us to welcome you to the club ...stop by our web site, read the rules, look at the recipe list and then please do get involved!  Note:  The rules are nearly non-existent and there is no schedule.  The recipe list is a shortened list of what is in the book, but has you selecting recipes that represent each key group of recipes in the book.  For example, you don't have to bake both Roasted Potato Bread and Potato Bread with Roasted Onions, you can pick just one and bake that.  The intention is to experience each major technique and category of bread at least once as you bake your way through the book.  Oh, and you don't have to bake in any particular order.  Just let your whims, moods, and feelings guide you!


We also maintain a blog aggregation web site (a site with updates coming from several member's blogs) that you can take a look at:


http://thebreadchallenge.weebly.com


My blog is at: http://briandixon.weebly.com


Whole Wheat Bread with a Multigrain Soaker, p. 126


 


Hope to see you soon!  Use the contact info at our web site (above) when you wish to join and I will add your name to the list.  If you maintain a blog, or want to, we can help with that and we will add links for to our site for that as well.


 


Thanks for listening!


Brian


 


 


 

boophils's picture
boophils

Breadmaker makes heavy, dry and tough bread.

Have obtained a Morphy Richards Fast Bake from a friend who no longer wanted it. Downloaded manuals and following it to the letter, however the bread is heavy, dry with a very tough crust. It is edible, but not what we were hoping. Tried 3 different recipes and new yeast sachet used each time. I have seen many people saying that they use bread machines for making the dough and bake it themselves in an oven. Is the the best way to get a good texture and a good crust or does anybody have any other ideas?


For information our favourite general breads are granary, baguette and tiger loaf.


 


 

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