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JoeVa's picture
JoeVa

Pizza Margherita (Naturally Leavened)

Pizza is bread, bread crust.


                  


I think a good pizza should have:



  • good dough: naturally leavened or proofed with indirect method like poolish or biga (that is: small amount of fresh yeast and a lot, a lot of time). I said "pizza is bread" because the actor in pizza is dough first, then the topping.

  • no more than 2 topping ingredients: mozzarella, pomodoro (tomato). I never eat and I do not agree with super topped pizza with "strange and exotic" topping. The biggest hazard I can do is mozzarella, pomodoro ciliegino and rucola (?garden rocket?) ... sorry I forgot olive oil and origano or basilico.

  • fast baking: the best pizza is baked in a wood fired oven at about 460°C in 00:01:30 / 00:02:00. In no more than 2 minutes the thin dough should cry, springing and browning.


There are a lot of pizza experts all over the world but the best pizza I ate was in Napoli. Is there a secret? I don't know! So my pizza is simple and good, not as good as true Pizza Napoletana, but I can't do better ...


Overall formula

Bread Flour 100%
Malted Flour 1.5%
Water* 65%
Salt 2.5%

*water should be adjusted with the absorption rate of **your** flour.

Preferment: 15%-20% of the total flour (bread flour) is prefermented at 100% hydration. Remember to subtract the flour and water from the final dough ingredients. I usually do a 1:2:2 feeding in the morning (08:00) so that my starter is ready after lunch (14:00) and I can mix the dough for pizza dinner.

Dough consistency: soft dough

Process

  • Mix all ingredients except salt (desired dough temperature 26/27°C)
  • Autolyse 00:30, then add salt on top
  • Mix at medium gluten development
  • [Puntata]Rest for about 01:00.
  • [Staglio] Divide and shape small ball (220-250g)
  • [Appretto] Proof 04:00 at 25°C
  • Bake on stone at the high temperature as fast as you can.
When pizza is removed from the oven I add a bit of olive oil and a pinch of salt on top.
I use a small electric pizza oven with baking stone and 400°C temperature (G3 Ferrari) - this is my baking trick. With this oven I can bake in about 5 minutes! Not fast as a wood fired oven ...                                                
Dough:                 

Pizza:

                

Cornicione:

                

Bottom (blistered crust and brown spots):

                

Giovanni

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Amaranth Starter

Inspired by Charles Luce gluten free millet starter (following instructions in The Bread Builders, by Daniel Wing and Alan Scott)   I startered a sourdough starter using amaranth...


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/14476/excellent-gluten-free-bread#comment-91244


I am repeating part of the thread below so that when I use the starter with gluten flours, it will not be confusing in Charles's gluten free thread.  The discussion can be carried on here about using amaranth sourdough starter in gluten breads.  I also want to try his recipe for millet bread but use amaranth starter.  He has much more experience than I with gluten free breads and this has interesting and fascinating overlaps I'm only beginning to discover.


Nov 16 //  ...to make a starter.  It smells much like corn.  For obvious reasons, I didn't rinse the grain first but put it directly into a blender to turn it to flour.  Then I mixed 60g with 60g water and it sat 57 hours (instead of 48) 16°c to 17°c 


Nov 18 //   I added 60g more amaranth flour and 60g water, blended well  16°c.


I'm hoping it will make the amaranth tastier, milder maybe.  This could be the "trick" I've been waiting for.


Nov 19 //   I got life!  I forgot it again, it is 24 hours since I fed it and it is bubbly and rounded and even a little bit risen!  Amazing!  Can't smell any "sour" still smells like wet amaranth (yuck) or wet corn but I know it is active.  I stirred it and forced it to collapse.  In stirring I can feel the bubbles or pockets of gas in the starter.  Now to dump half and feed again but in the warmer room to help develop the yeasts.  I will also start washing the amaranth and adding the water then blending before adding to the starter.   The photos are before and after stirring:



 


Nov 20 //    First thing was to smell my starter.   Na ya...   ... went for cooked rolled oats this chilly foggy morning.  When I discard today I plan to try a glutinous 10 grain flour and we will see if it lifts it.  I've not yet aquired xanthum gum and millet flour.  I would be interested in mixing the amaranth starter in a palatable mixture of GF flours.  Maybe the Montana Mix that Charles mentions and suggests on his blog.   Amaranth can be quite strong in flavor and smells of Autumn.   Wet leaves and mushrooms, truffle  come to mind along with dry red wine and soaked beans ...thyme.  Charles Luce seemed to also be in a similar lock of the senses and on the above mentioned thread writes: 



...walked through my neighborhood, which is quite Hispanic, smelling the smells and thinking of your question. Potato starch flour comes to mind, as does banana flour, yuca (tapioca)flour and corn masa (used for making corn tortillas in Mexico). Maybe coconut flour too. Then I read that porcini (Steinpilz) work w/ amaranth...



I had read that amaranth was often combined with banana and chocolate, also seems to be used more in cakes and sweet recipes...  I use a fine metal coffee filter for washing the grain.   Coconut milk.... interesting.


Okay, it's evening now and I'm looking into my starter and the smell is....getting sour and the amaranth is taking on a milder smell.  This looks promising!  This is good!  Ooo can't wait for the bread!  I mixed it 1-2-3  120g starter - 240g water - 345g 10 grain flour  autolyse  and work in 1 tsp salt.  Three hours in the kitchen then into a cool room for the night.  To bake tomorrow.  Better plain for the first loaf,  then come more taste experiments.


Now I'm working on the remaining 120g of starter.  I am rinsing 60g amaranth and will dry it before milling and adding.  It dries nicely in a smooth dish towel, the grain doesn't seem to stick at all.   This time I feed it 60g amaranth shortly blenderized (no water but the tiny seeds seem to slip avoiding the blades) mix well and after 3 hours tuck away into the fridge.  I'm liking the smell of the starter, I really do.


Mini Oven


 


 

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Chard and Saffron Tart with Yeasted Tart Dough


This tart made a delicious dinner. The tart was lighter than a traditional quiche because of the yeasted crust. We really enjoyed the Chard and saffron filling. (Hans: I’m thinking this is right up your alley and that you will come up with some magnificent variation!) I used crème fraîche in the dough but will use butter next time. Although the crème fraîche made the dough very tender, I think butter would have made the dough easier to work with and given the finished product a more flavorful crust. In other words, I thought the crust was a bit on the bland side.



The tart, dough and recipe, were adapted from The Greens Cookbook by Deborah Madison.


Yeasted Tart Dough


1 teaspoon instant yeast


¼ cup warm water


1 large egg, room temperature


150 to 200 grams flour (I used Guisto’s Baker’s Choice)


½ teaspoon salt


3 tablespoons crème fraîche or soft unsalted butter


Dissolve the yeast in water. Combine 150 grams of the flour and salt in a medium bowl, and make a well. Break the egg into the middle of the well and add the crème fraîche or soft unsalted butter (I used crème fraîche, and an extra large egg, so had to add additional flour), and dissolved yeast.


Mix everything together with a flexible spatula, shape into a loose ball, cover and let rise until double, about 1 hour.




Chard and Saffron Tart


1 large bunch of chard, enough to make 8 cups of leaves roughly chopped


1 tablespoon butter


1 tablespoon olive oil


1 large onion, medium diced (about ¼” dice)


2 cloves garlic, finely diced or pressed


¾ teaspoon salt


3 eggs


1 ½ cups milk or cream or a combination of both (I used regular cream-topped milk)


Large pinch of saffron threads, soaked in 1 tablespoon of hot water


½ teaspoon finely grated fresh orange zest


6 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese (about 1 1/2 ounces)


Nutmeg


2 tablespoons parsley, chopped


pepper


3 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted in a dry pan


Prepare the yeasted tart dough and set aside to rise in a warm place.


Cut the chard leaves away from the steams and chop the leaves into pieces about 1 inch square, wash well, and drain in a colander.


Preheat oven to 375 degrees and soak the saffron threads.


Heat the butter and oil in a large 12-inch skillet. Add the onions and cook over medium heat until soft and translucent (do not brown), about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, chard leaves and salt. Turn the leaves over repeatedly with tongs until they are tender, about 5 minutes. Set pan aside.


Prepare the tart shell: Flatten out the dough and place in a quiche pan (I used a 10” x 2” deep tin quiche pan with a removable bottom sprayed lightly with pan-spray)*. Press the dough out to the edge using your finger tips and up the sides. You can let the dough relax for 20 minutes if it starts shrinking back on you. I was only able to coax the dough about half-way up the side of the pan which was just high enough to hold the filling. The dough should be thicker on the sides and thinner on the bottom. I was pleased to see that as the tart baked both the dough and its filling rose up to the top of the pan.




Make the custard: beat the eggs, stir in the milk or cream, infused saffron thread liquid, orange zest, Parmesan, a few shaving of nutmeg, and the parsley. Stir in the chard and onion mixture, taste, and season with more salt if needed, and pepper.


Pour the filling into the tart shell and scatter the toasted pine nuts on top.


Bake until the crust is nicely browned and the custard is set, about 50 minutes. (I placed the quiche pan on a baking tray. If I had placed it directly on the rack, the baking time might have been shorter.)


Unmold and serve with a salad (I made a salad of butter lettuce and fresh navel orange slices tossed with a herb shallot walnut oil vinaigrette).


Serves 4 to 6



--Pamela

*If you don't own this type of deep quiche pan, I think you might be able to use an 8" inch spring-form cake pan. You don't have to worry about the filling leaking out because the tart dough is like bread dough.

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Rolled Oats and Apple Bread

Another winner from Dan Lepard's book "The handmade loaf".



The dough was very sticky and wet from soaked oats and grated apples (I used Fuji), but I like wet dough. I used Sir Lancelot high gluten flour because I ran out of bread flour at home (17 different kinds of flour, yet that's the one I ran out), the end result was a beautiful bread with open, moist, and chewy crumb. Intentionally left a few bigger chunks of apple in the dough, which made the apple taste stronger.



The book called for 3/4 tsb of fresh yeast, I used less than 1/2tsb of instant yeast. Even though Dan suggested that the amount of instant yeast should be half of fresh yeast IN WEIGHT, which is equal amount in VOLUME, I found that I only need half of the yeast IN WEIGHT if I use instant, otherwise it fermentate and proof way too fast. Even with barely 1/2 tsb, my proofing time was only 45 minutes, not 1.5 hour suggested in the book. (My kitchen was pretty warm that day though)



I really like the subtle warm/tart/sweet taste of this bread, thanks to the oats and apple, it goes well with jam/butter, great as a sandwich with some ham and veggies too.


Elagins's picture
Elagins

Free Shipping from NYBakers

It occurred to me that I wasn't clear about how the NYB free shipping offer works, and that anyone who orders will see shipping added onto their total. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to figure out how to turn off the Paypal shipping calculator, so as I've explained to those who've phoned me, you need to pay the full amount, including the shipping, which I will then immediately refund. It's a bit roundabout, but for the moment, it's the best I can do. NYB is a work in progress, and I apologize for any misunderstandings.


Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

Dillbert's picture
Dillbert

Broetchen lover

Hi folks -


having lived in Germany for extended periods, I've been 'on the rampage' to bake some good broetchen here in USA.


recently acquired some Backmalz (diastatic malt powder) and that seems to convey the flavor, exterior crunch and softer interior of a good breakfast broetchen.


any experience / known/tried recipes / tips on Backmalz & broetchen?


 

Lucy-Sue's picture
Lucy-Sue

Sourdough starter question for Sourdough lady, my first attempt

Hi:  I am using the recipe from sourdough lady.  On day 4 I disgarded all but 1/4 cup and added white flour and water.  The next day it is bubbling and happy.  Today is day 5 and I did the same thing. Hopefully it will bubble again.


My question is:  Do I do this every day?  When does it go into the fridge and do I disgard it all but 1/4 of a cup everyday when it is in the fridge and add the flour and water?


My next question is:  when can I use it?


Thanks!


Lucy

breadnik's picture
breadnik

One-step Panettone?

Well, I thought I was preparing for Christmas well in advance but it turns out I wasn't.


I've been reading the BBA at lunch (as is generally my habit, to read cookbooks while I eat -- this is how I learned to cook in the first place) and came across Panettone recipe. I thought, what a great idea, I'll make this for my Christmas farmers' market. My customers would love that -- and I still have plenty of time to practice making it.


No such luck, of course. Having read closer, I realized that to follow PR's recipe I'd have to embark on a whole new adventure of getting involved with barm. As I said in my first post, I am still deathly afraid to try my hand at multiple-step doughs. Basically, it all boils down to my fear of using formulas and getting confused with math.


So I started looking for a tried and true panettone recipe that does not involve barm. My TFL search produced a number of threads (with plenty of beautiful pictures) but no recipes that would be a simpler one-step process. Someone mentioned Jim Lahey's slow-rise panettone recipe and I decided that I would like try that. Is there a recipe on line? I looked and looked but couldn't find it. If it exists, I would really appreciate a link. If it doesn't, is it in his new book?


Which brings up another question. Like so many others, I started baking thanks to Jim Lahey's no-knead bread. So I would really like to have his book. What's your opinion? Is it a book worth having?


I would be very grateful for any thoughts and suggestions.


Nika

katyajini's picture
katyajini

Recommendation for sandwich loaf pans: metal/glass/other?

What is your favorite bread loaf pan?


I am just getting into bread baking and would like to bake leavened sandwich type loaves.  What are your preferences for loaf pans that work well for this type of bread?  I have used many types of baking pans and have my favorites but I don’t know what would be best for bread.  And if metal, is there a certain type and manufacturer that turns out to be better than others?  So much goes into making a loaf of bread that I do want to spend the time and energy (and the money) in buying well-performing pans.


Thanks a lot


K.  

rolls's picture
rolls

looking for good pannetone recipe

hi can someone please direct me to a good panetone recipe. thanks!

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