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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Today's breads - Boules and Baguettes with G. Rubaud Flour Mix

 


I'm continuing my exploration of bread baking with Gérard Rubaud's mix of flours. Today's breads were made with a firm levain, as used by Rubaud, and a high-hydration final dough. I made about 1500 gms of dough. The flour required is shown in the first chart.


Flour

%

Wt (gms)

All-purpose

70

583

Whole wheat

18

150

Whole spelt

9

75

Whole rye

3

25

Total

100

833

I divided the dough to shape two 500 gm boules and two 250 gm ficelles.

Total dough

 

 

Ingredient

Amount (gms)

Bakers' %

Flour

833

100

Water

650

78

Salt

16

2

Total

1499

180

 

Levain

 

 

Ingredient

Amount (gms)

Bakers' %

Flour

183

100

Water

103

56

Active starter

47

26

Total

333

 

 

Final dough

 

 

Ingredient

Amount (gms)

Bakers' %

Flour

650

100

Water

547

84

Salt

16

2

Levain

286

44

Total

1499

 

 

We had some of the baguette with dinner. It is a mildly sour bread with a delicious flavor, like the other breads made with this mix of flours.

David

 

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

2/23/10 - 2.225 kg Mixed Levain Miche

Hey All,


Just wanted to share with you a very large 2.225 kg mixed levain miche that I baked on 2/23/10.  It is roughly 12 1/2" in diameter by 5 1/2" tall.  It was well worth staying up late on a weeknight to do.  We cut into it on 2/25/10 at a dinner part, and it was worth the wait...


Please excuse the crumb shot as it was from my friend's iPhone under less than stellar lighting conditions...


Tim






Formula:


Stiff Levain


216g - AP


129g - Water


22g - Firm SD starter (60-65% hydration)


366g total




Liquid Levain


144g - AP


144g - Water


14g - Firm SD starter (60-65% hydration)


302g total




Final Dough


576g - AP


286g - BF


144g - Organic Hard Wheat Berries (freshly ground)


44g - Organic Spelt Berries (freshly ground)


30g - Organic Rye Berries (freshly ground)


762g - Water


26g - Kosher Salt


366g - Stiff Levain


302g - Liquid Levain


Approx 2500-2600g total dough


 


Directions:


7:00am - Mix stiff and liquid levains, place each in covered containers and let ferment on counter for 8-10 hours.


6:40pm - Measure out final dough ingredients.  Prepare a bowl of water for dipping your hands to knead.  Place all water in large mixing bowl.  Cut up stiff levain and place in mixing bowl along with liquid levain.  Add all try ingredients on top and mix well with wooden spoon.  After all is combined, with wet hands, knead dough in bowl using french fold method squishing out any lumps.  Knead for about 5 minutes until relatively smooth dough, cover and let rest for 30 minutes.


7:15pm - Turn dough using stretch and fold method, cover and let rest.


7:45pm - Turn dough, cover and let rest.


8:15pm - Turn dough, cover and let rest.


8:45pm - Turn dough, cover and let rest.


9:15pm - Turn dough, cover and let rest.


10:15pm - Turn dough out onto lightly floured surface and shape into boule.  Cover and let rest for 15mins.


10:30pm - Final shape and place into floured linen lined basket, lightly flour top of dough, place towel on top, place basket in plastic bag, proof for 60-90 minutes.


11:15pm - Place baking stone on 2nd rack from bottom, prepare steam pan, preheat 550F with convection.


11:45pm - Add 1 cup of water to steam pan, close door.  Turn boule out onto floured peel, slash, place directly onto baking stone, add 1 more cup of water to steam pan, close door.  Turn oven down to 460F, no convection.  Bake for 20 minutes.  Rotate loaf, bake for another 15 minutes.  Then turn down oven to 400F and bake for another 55 minutes, rotating half way.  Loaf is done when internal temp reaches approx 210F.  Cool and rest for 24hrs before eating.


 


 

ritav's picture
ritav

SWEET TARALI

Following is a sweet tarali recipe for all seasons.  They are light, sweet and delightful...you can't stop eating them.  They are also great dunked in red wine.


 


Sweet Taralli

6 large eggs


1-1/2 t. salt


½ cup shortening preferable Crisco


1/2 envelope of dry yeast


1/2-cup water


6 to 6-1/2 cups all-purpose flour (Do not use all the flour if not needed.)


 


Glaze

2 egg whites or Just Whites equal to 2 eggs (4 t. Just Whites & 4 T. water)


4 cups of sifted confectioners sugar


2 t. lemon extract


 


Instructions

  •  Proof yeast in water heated to 110 degrees

  •  Beat eggs until fluffy and mix with shortening, salt. Then add the yeast mixture and flour.

  •  Place on floured board and knead for 5 minutes. Let set for 10 minutes.

  •  In the meantime, bring a large pot of water to a boil.

  •  After 5 minutes, knead the dough again for 5 minutes and rest for 10 minutes.

  •  Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

  •  Cut pieces of dough the size of a golf ball and shape as desired (twists, circles or whatever you wish). Do not overwork the dough.

  •  Drop into boiling water until taralli floats to the top. Remove and set on clean dishtowel to drain.

  • äWhen all the taralli have been boiled, place on baking sheets lined with parchment paper and bake for 10 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350 degrees and continue to bake for 10 minutes or until they are brown in color.

  •  Cool completely on a rack. 


Icing Glaze



  •  In a mixer bowl beat egg whites and confectioner's sugar until very stiff. Add the lemon extract and beat to blend. If too stiff for dipping, add a little water and beat again.  Dip each tarali in the glaze and set on a rack with a pan underneath for dripping.


Makes approximately 30 to 35 taralli.


 www.ritaventurino.com


 

nirbeltran's picture
nirbeltran

spelt- rye sourough

well i have to admit i am hardly using yeast any more - all my breads are now based on my sourdough and its been living in my fridge for a few good months now .


i use the basic starter formula from Barry Harmon's site with a few changes for this bread :


60g of sourdough @ 75% hidration - i fed mine one day before mixing .


mix with 80g ap flour


20g whole grain rye flour


20g spelt flour


and 120g water


 


let is rest on the kitchen counter overnight ( i waited about 12 hours )


 


then add


200g ap flour


50g whole grain rye flour


50 spelt flour


and 300g of water


again let it sit for 12 hours


 


then i mixed the final dough


to the 900g of starter i added 


25g salt


380g water


600g ap flour


100g whole grain flour


90g spelt flour


mixed all and let it rest for about 6 hours


 


then did a stretch and fold .


divied in two loafes , shaped and into the fridge for 12 hours or so


 


baked  covered for 30 minutes amd then 15 more uncovered - i used an iron cast pot .


my oven is a stove gas oven and its a little warmer then normal kitchen stoves - i bake 2 280-300 c


but i guess it will work the same with a normal 250 c baking heat 


 


yozzause's picture
yozzause

mad baking

With a forecast temperature of 42 degrees CENTIGRADE  for the following day you would have to be mad to even thinking of lighting the oven, BUT that's what i did, my sourdough starter was looking pretty vigourus so i decided to put it to use. This bread EVOLVED,  i decided to use 500g white flour and 200g of my starter i then thought i would add my home brew lager beer, unfortunately i opened my dark stout by mistake. Not normally a problem to drink but it was warm and aussies do like their beer cold.especially in hot weather so rather than waste it and open a lager i decided to add it to the dough. I then thought it would be a good idea to add some course rye that i had.


so what went in


500g white flour    


200g s/d starter


100g course rye


14g salt 30g olive oil


412ml dark stout


dough was mixed and given a bulk ferment for 3 and a half hours then given a stretch and fold it was about half proofed at that time. Much later that night i devided the dough into 2 pieces and shaped 1 piece went into the fridge and was retarded the other was formed and allowed to rise (slowly).


At 5.00am i got up and popped the oven on  and 30 minutes later it went into the oven  the other dough was pulled from the fridge and was going to be baked at work later.


The end result was acceptable i thought there might have been a more noticable difference between the two, there was a difference in the taste and the consensus was the retarded one was slightly better tasting.  


  so we had a dough that was 12 hours from start to finish and the other half was a further 5 or more hours


 THE


 


TEMPERATURE OUTSIDE HAS NOW REACHED 42 AS THEY FORECAST, COOLER FOR THE NEXT FEW DAYS 36,36 & 35


kind and warm regards especially those that are in the snow YOZZA

vince hav's picture
vince hav

pleas e verify what "room temp" could be

i have read several recipe that call for things to be room temp..


my question is there a standerd for this..? when i read this today i went to my thermostat an looked at the room temp...it was 60 degree F. someone elese maybe 78 degrees F so that made me wonder..whats "room temp"?

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci

Easter Dolci - A taralli that floats on air


Traditional Italian Eastser desserts, the taralli is a treasure from Apuglia.


 



http://turosdolci.wordpress.com


 

LuckyOven's picture
LuckyOven

Breadsticks —— My Second Bread

Today is my second day in baking bread in my life. I am easy to excited and fast to fall in love with something new and creative. This morning i bought The Bread Baker's Apprentice which The Flash Loaf recommended and find a recipe easy to follow and also funny to made —— the breadsticks. I use the white bread formula to make the dough, and using the half dough to make a simple loaf for my breakfast , another half dough to make my fingerfood breadsticks. The outcoming is delicious, i like the milk smell fill in my room when i am baking. I like the shape of the breadsticks, long, crisp and litte soft inside.


those are my second bread: white bread loaf and my breadsticks.



 





dale1nemo's picture
dale1nemo

Dehydrating Starters

I am sure it has been mentioned here before ( newbie question ) . Has anybody spread their starters out on some wax or parchment in there food dehydrator and preserved it (dryed)  for future use ? I know you would have to check out the heat tempatures in various brands. Just a thought !

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Not-too-sweet Sweet Rolls


My wife and I have a problem with cinnamon rolls. She dislikes the gooey, too-sweet frosting found on most, and she gives me a hard time about sweet doughs with too much butter for my health. So, I'm on a new quest: A breakfast pastry we both like that is still kind to my arteries. (I'm not that concerned about the cholesterol, but my wife's persistent expressions of concern can't be good for my heart.)


Last week, I got Ciril Hitz's latest book, “Baking Artisan Pastries and Breads.” Like his previous book, “Baking Artisan Bread,” it is aimed at the home baker. While providing clear and detailed instructions that do not assume the reader has a degree in culinary arts, the formulas are in no way “dumbed down.” He teaches professional techniques and tricks for mixing doughs and making classic fillings, all adapted to home baking equipment and quantities. Also, like his previous book, he introduces a small number of basic doughs – for quick breads, sweet rolls and laminated dough pastries – then provides a number of formulas for products made with each and suggestions for additional applications.


When I … well … we saw Hitz's formula for sweet dough, we were struck by it appearing less enriched than most. His formula calls for only 10.6% butter and 10.6% sugar. I made a batch last night and retarded it in the fridge (as Hitz prescribes) until this evening. Hitz has formulas for cinnamon rolls and sticky buns, but I wanted a pastry that was less sweet. Among his recipes for pastry fillings I found one he calls “nut filling.” It looked good, since we love nuts, and looked less sweet than ones that are mostly sugar. So, I also made a batch of nut filling last night and stuck it in the fridge.


This evening, I rolled out the dough, spread it with nut filling, rolled it up and cut it into 1.5 inch rounds. (Actually, I just cut half the roll-up. I froze the other half for another day.) I put some pecan halves on the top of each, proofed, egg washed and baked them in a 1/4 sheet pan on parchment. I did not glaze them.



As expected, the dough was less sweet and less rich than most, but with the nut filling, the pastry is just sweet and rich enough for my taste. This is a nice solution for those who find most cinnamon rolls and sticky buns just too sweet. If one wanted a richer dough, another formula for sweet dough could certainly be substituted.


The nut filling (makes about 1.5 cups)


Nut flour (almond or hazelnuts)

125 gms

Granulated sugar

100 gms

Corn syrup

25 gms

Water

Up to 60 gms

Method

Use purchased nut flour or make your own by pulsing frozen nuts in a food processor. Combine all the ingredients except the water. Slowly add the water to make a nice, spreadable consistency. It should not tear the dough when spread. It can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week. The consistency can be adjusted by adding water on the day of use.

I made the filling with frozen unsalted dry-roasted almonds. I processed them to a rather coarse consistency – coarser than coarse-ground flour but finer than “finely chopped.”

As I said, this is a “quest,” so stay tuned for further developments.

David

 

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