The Fresh Loaf

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BigelowBaker's picture
BigelowBaker

Weight-Loss Bread Recipes

I have a problem: I need to lose approximately 100 pounds, but I also LOVE to bake bread...

Along with exercising more and counting calories, one of the things I'd like to do to facilitate this journey (and hopefully add some fun, too :) is come up with a few unique bread recipes that are:

1) Healthy
2) Interesting
3) Have some quality relevent to weight-loss/healthy living

Some things to get out of the way right off the bat:

  • I know home-made bread isn't necessarily UNhealthy -- I'm more interested in making my regular baking an active part of my weight-loss journey
  • I typically bake using wild-yeast, which I know adds some health benefits
  • Number 2 above is really important. For example, I know that a 100% whole wheat sourdough is healthy and the fiber is good for weight loss, but it is the definition of uninteresting (at least in my opinion)
  • I already have Peter Reinhart's Whole Wheat Bread book :)

So...does anyone out there have any suggestions for recipes and/or interesting ingredients to add? I'm in particular interested in the health/weight loss properties of  alternative flours, for example rye, teff, flax seed, etc.

Thanks!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Christmas Bi-Color Rose - 30% Whole Grain, Pesto and Sun Dried Tomato

Our take on Breadsong’s fabulous Christmas Rose was to make it Green with basil pesto and Red with home made sun dried tomatoes.  We used our combo yeast water, rye sour and Desem sourdough starters with our 30% whole gain multi-grain mix of Kamut, dark rye, spelt and whole wheat.

 

As has been the norm lately, we added some red and white malt, Toady Tom’s Toasted Tidbits (wheat bran, oat bran, wheat germ and other middlings from various sifted flours), oats, potato flakes and flax seeds all ground up together as a fancy and festive bread enhancement all purpose mix.

  

We had a little less than 900 g of dough compared to Breadsongs’s 1,200 g that she split in half and she only used half.  We split this in half too,  to make 2 ropes – one basil, almond, walnut, Parmesan and olive oil and the other sun dried tomato, oregano, salt, pepper and olive oil.  We decided not to use any garlic and hoped we wouldn't miss it with all the other stuff in this bread’s fillings.

  

Each rope was split in half and combined with the other colored half and then braided to make (2) each red and green braids that were wrapped around each other to make a rose.  The ropes were smaller so we ended up with a more shallow Frisbee like, Italian Flat Bread Rose, but it was still very fancy do and Christmas festive looking.

  

The SD and YW levains were built separately over 8 hours now that it is winter time and refrigerated overnight.  The flours and all the other ingredients were mixed with the water and allowed to autolyse for 3 hours as the levains warmed up to room temperature the next day.

  

We made a little proofing pad with a heating pad on low covered with kitchen towels to get the temperature to hover right at 82 degrees.  The levains were not built on it but they were warmed up on it and the dough was fermented, developed and proofed on it too.  What a handy little contraption it turned out to be.

  

Once the levains hit the autolyse it was 12 minutes of French (2) slaps per fold in order to get this dough stretched, silky and smooth with a high degree of gluten development.  Normally we would have easily been over 75% hydration for a dough like this but, with the olive oil coming in later for both fillings, we decided to hold the water at 73.5%.  

 

After the French slap and folds were complete, we let the dough rest for 30 minutes and then 2 sets of S&F’s were done 30 minutes apart.  The dough was rested for 20 minutes, divided in half, rolled out with a pin and the filling spread on before rolling up into a log.

 

Each log was split in half and then braided with the opposite colored half and then the two green and red braids were coiled up on parchment to make the rose. 

The rose was allowed to ferment and develop on the proofing pad in a plastic bag for 1 ½ hours before being retarded overnight for 8 hours.  After removal from the fridge in the morning it was allowed to final proof on the proofing pad for 4 hours where it doubled in volume.

We had some lemon infused olive oil, balsamic vinegar, cracked black pepper and Parmesan cheese to dip the bread into for lunch.

The mini oven was fired up to 425 F with steam in the bottom of the broiler pan.  The bread was loaded and allowed to steam for 10 minutes before the steam was removed.   The bread baked at 350 F, convection this time, until it hit 200 F in the middle.  It was rotated 90 degrees every 5 minutes until it was done and removed to a cooling rack - about 30 minutes total baking time.

My daughter said this was the best tasting bread I have ever made but she, being away for college, only gets to sample about 10% of the bread baked around here.  My wife wants to have it dipped in olive oil, with grated Parmesan, rosemary and black pepper for a Christmas dinner appetizer.

My apprentice just wants to eat all right now with butter and not have to share it with anyone including her master!  I think that this is one of the best higher whole grain focaccias I have ever tasted.  Just delicious.  The mini oven put mini blisters on the crispy brown crust and the YW made the crumb moist and tender with that hint of SD that lingers with the herbs and tomato.

Christmas Rose - 30% Whole Grain, Pesto and Sun Dried Tomato

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixed Starter

Build 1

Total

%

SD Starter

10

10

1.98%

AP

78

78

19.80%

WW

5

5

1.27%

Spelt

5

5

1.27%

Kamut

5

5

1.27%

Yeast Water

50

50

12.69%

Dark Rye

13

13

3.30%

Water

56

56

14.21%

Total Starter

222

222

56.35%

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

24.83%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Spelt

20

5.08%

 

WW

20

5.08%

 

Dark Rye

20

5.08%

 

Toady Tom's Toasted Tidbits

20

5.08%

 

Red Malt

2

0.51%

 

White Malt

2

0.51%

 

Kamut

20

5.08%

 

Potato Flakes

20

5.08%

 

Oat Flour

20

5.08%

 

AP

250

63.45%

 

Dough Flour

394

100.00%

 

Salt

8

2.03%

 

Water

260

65.99%

 

Dough Hydration

65.99%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

505

 

 

Water

371

 

 

Total Dough Hydration

73.47%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

73.47%

 

 

Total Weight

894

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grains

31.09%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Ground Flax Seeds

10

2.54%

 

Total

10

2.54%

 

 

 

 

 

3 T each Basil Pesto & Sun Dried Tomatoes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Any Suggestions For a Poolish Baguette with Added Whole Grain?

Does anyone have a good poolish baguette recipe with added whole grain flours such as rye and whole wheat?

Something similar to JH Poolish Baguette recipe.

Thanks!

John

linder's picture
linder

NY Deli Onion Sourdough Rye

Today, I baked 2 loaves of New York Deli Onion Sourdough Rye from The Bread Baker's Apprentice.  They look ALOT better than the previous attempt.  It's amazing what can happen when you watch the bread and make sure it doesn't overproof.  I'm still getting used to my make-shift microwave proof box.  The temp in there is about 80F so proofing loaves goes really fast.  I also reduced the amount of yeast in the bread to 1 1/2 tsp. instead of 2 tsp. which had seemed pretty high considering there is also a good amount of rye sourdough starter in the bread as well.  Here are my pretties -

ngolovin's picture
ngolovin

Maple syrup in breads

Hi all,

I have been baking breads for a while.  I have seen all sorts of sweeteners used in breads such as honey, molasses, agave, brown and regular sugar.  I do not have a recipe with maple syrup.  I made this comment, while munching on my latest loaf, to my wife and was asked why.  That is a good question, so I thought I would pose this question to the forum.  Why isn't there a recipe that uses maple syrup as the sweetener in a bread?  If there is, please let me know where I can find the recipe.  I thank you all, in advance.

Happy Holidays!
Ngolovin

jimrich17's picture
jimrich17

BREAD Volume 4

I do not remember seeing any posts to the well-written and illustrated emagazine BREAD written by a Finnish enthusiast, Jarkko Laine. Volume 4 has just been issued and you can access it -as well as the three previous volumes at his website: wwwinsanelyinterested.com

Enjoy!

 

aster's picture
aster

Getting a nice *airy* French bread loaf, plenty o' holes?

Hi all.

Novice bread baker here. Recently I've been trying to get a decent simple home-baked French bread loaf, and while my results have been "serviceable" I'd like to really kick it up a notch.

I've been going off the French breard recipe in Reinhart's "The Bread Baker's Apprentice" - pate fermentee left overnight and the loaf made by-the-book & shaped either into a batard or in a rectangular loaf pan. Everything generally looks good throughout the process (though I'm only now getting the hang of shaping/pinching the batard so it doesn't spread outward completely) and in the initial baking stages I get good oven spring, etc. But when sliced open the loaves tend to not have all the variable-sized holes that you find in bakery French bread. Mine are mostly small and uniform with occasionally a couple slightly bigger ones mixed in, but never the nice airy cavities that give it the rustic look & texture.

Here's an example of a recent pan loaf. This is my best result by far - most look a bit denser - but as you can see it doesn't have any nice big bubbles. Any tips would be much appreciated...

On another note, I've noticed my breads tend to have a yellowish tint when finished, much moreso than the French loaves I buy at the local bakery. I'm guessing this is due to the flour (I've used King Arthur and Bob's Red Mill)?

sam's picture
sam

Onion rolls

Hello,

I decided to try making onion rolls, and of course the first thing I usually do when trying something new, is search TFL.   This isn't an exact replica but there are several wonderful onion roll recipes and ideas here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/normsonionrolls

All the flour I used was king arthur high gluten flour.  I did not have any malt syrup, I only had diatastic malt powder, so I used that instead.  I paid attention to the recommendation by others to re-use the infused onion water in the final dough.  I soaked the dried minced onions with an assortment of various types of seeds which I got from king arthur as well.  It has flax, toasted sesame, black caraway, midget sunflower, poppy, and anise.

Poolish:

Flour Weight: 177 grams
Water Weight: 177 grams
Yeast Weight: 0.35 grams

Final Dough:

All Poolish
Flour Weight: 529 grams
Water Weight: 273 grams (use the leftover onion-infused water)
Eggs Weight: 35 grams
Sugar Weight: 35 grams
Vegetable Oil Weight: 35 grams
Salt Weight: 14 grams
Malt Powder Weight: 7 grams (I only had diatastic malt on hand)
Yeast Weight: 14 grams

Procedure:

The night before the bake, mix poolish, and soak the dried minced onions + seed mixture.

Next morning, when the poolish is ripened,  drain the excess water from the onion-seed mixture but save the water and use it for the final dough.  

Bulk ferment 2 hrs, with stretch + fold half-way through.

Shape into little balls scaled to appx 100 grams. Let rest a few minutes to relax. To apply the onion-seed mixture, I used a flat clear pyrex plate, and smushed the balls flat into the mixture using the plate.  Using a hard surface to mush the balls into the onion mixture seemed to be effective because you can apply an even solid force.  You may need to grease the plate a bit.  Flip over the dough discs and place onto baking tray or bun-pan.

Bake with steam at 400F for 30 mins or until done.

Pictures:

First, the onion-seed mixture after being rehydrated.  Looks kinda like white rice.

 

 

Next, the flattened discs just at the beginning of the final ferment.  I decided to use my burger bun pans:

 

After a while of final fermenting, I had thought these were fully proved and ready to bake:

 

But I was wrong, as they did increase in size fairly well in the oven.  I guess I was too impatient.  No blowouts though.  

 

 

Happy baking!

 

HappyHighwayman's picture
HappyHighwayman

Pumpernickel recipe

Anyone have a good pumpernickle recipe for me? Sourdough starter based or otherwise?

 

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

I want to kill the LABs in my starter

Let's assume that I wanted to kill the lactobacilli in my starter, or at least reduce as much as possible their activity (I don't want them to do anything at all: no acid and no enzyme release).

How could I do it without exposing my starter to molds and without inhibiting the vitality of the yeasts, if at all possible? Could the wild yeasts live in a less acidic or even neutral environment?

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