The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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breadsong's picture
breadsong

Grateful for local flour and eggs

Hello,

I’ve really been enjoying baking over the last few weeks, with local flour and eggs.
Here are a few things; I'll try to keep it short :^)

Today's bake was based on Whole Wheat Pitas, from Mr. Reinhart's book Whole Grain Breads.
Recalling the delicious barley flour pita sampled at Kneading Conference West (thanks to Andrew Ross and Leslie Mackie), I substituted 50% Red Fife wheat flour (75% sifted) and 50% Fairhaven whole grain barley flour, to try to replicate.
I was delighted! to receive the Fairhaven whole grain barley flour as a gift and to have the chance to try it out in these pitas (with many, many thanks to the one that kindly gifted this barley flour to me!). 
The flavor and texture of these pitas are just what I hoped for.



I got my firebrick baking stone up to 550F to bake these!
 


Yesterday's bake was German-Style Many Seed Bread, also from Mr. Reinhart's book Whole Grain Breads.  After Khalid posted about his beautiful version of this bread, I was inspired to make some. We all loved it here, and I was happy to make more this weekend. Both bakes were made with 100% whole wheat flour grown by my local wheat farmer (there's a bit of whole rye in there too).
I caught Andy's post yesterday and wanted to try shaping my pan loaves like his lovely sunflower-coated loaf!

Yesterday's bake, and crumb shot:
                                             

This bake was inspired by MC's posts, Winthrop Whole Wheat Loaf  and Meet the Baker: Scott Mangold.  
I was so happy to see these posts, having the pleasure of  meeting Mr. Mangold and visiting BreadFarm bakery last September.  What a lovely bakery - incredibly beautiful loaves and cookies.
For this wheat loaf, I substituted 75% sifted Red Fife for the soaker and final dough, and my local farmer's farm-milled 100% whole wheat in the levain.
I loved the acidity and flavor from the whole wheat levain in the wheat loaf, and the bloom this loaf got in the oven!

                                                                                                        ... crumb 

My local wheat farmer raises the most beautiful chickens, and has been giving me lots of perfect eggs…I used some to make chiffon cake and a flourless, butterless (almost unheard of in my kitchen!) cake of Nigella Lawson's.

The chiffon cake, a 'chai chiffon', is based on this recipe from Fine Cooking magazine.
Substitutions:
¾ cup brewed chai tea for the water, lemon juice, lemon zest
1 tsp baking powder for 1.5 tsp baking powder
2 tsp vanilla extract for ½ tsp vanilla extract
about 20% of the cake flour with local soft whole wheat flour
Additions:
Chai spices to equal 4 tsp: 2 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp ginger, ¼ tsp each allspice, clove, nutmeg, cardamom
Chai tea leaves (one teabag), ground in mortar and pestle, added to dry ingredients

Lastly! Nigella Lawson's Clementine Cake (using some organic  Satsuma mandarins)

I whipped the eggs and sugar in the mixer until it was good and thick, then folded in the pureed mandarin, almond meal and baking powder (and a bit of salt, ¼ tsp).  I baked the batter in three pans (two small tube pans and a small round cake pan). I thought the tube pans were better choices for a good thorough bake for this batter. This cake wasn't one of my husband's favorites, but I liked it and enjoyed chance to try something different (a cake with no flour and no butter!).


Happy baking everyone!
:^) from breadsong

Submitted to Susan's weekly event, Yeastspotting :^)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Southwest Hummus Anyone?

You just have to have some hummus with that great Pita bread you just made but don't buy that crud in the store that is just horrible and full a so many bad things, foul smells and  unusual tastes.  Make your own it is easy!!!  Here is how.  Simmer off till tender 1 1/2 cups of  dried Garbanzos (about an hour) that you soaked overnight in some home made chicken stock to cover and a bay leaf.  Let the beans cool in the stock in the fridge and drain off the liquid and reserve it in case the hummus is too thick or, better yet, to make garbanzo bean soup.

Take an onion and slice it width wise in thirds and put tooth pick in from the side to hold the onions together,  Slice some pieces of peppers (red, jalapeno, Serrano, poblano and hatch green also known as Anaheim) so the wide exterior skins lay flat.  Take some garlic cloves (at least 5)  coat them in olive oil and wrap in aluminum foil. brush the veggies with olive oil and grill them until they are nearly black.

Put the veggies in plastic bag or covered container or plastic wrap to sweat for 10 minutes so the skins of the peppers slough off easily.  Buzz the garlic, skinned peppers, onions and garbanzos in a food processor until smooth.  Add 2 T of Tahini (Sesame paste), 1 tsp salt, 3 T of lemon juice, 3 T of olive oil and buzz again until the Hummus is smooth as butter.  If it is too thick add some of the reserved hummus chicken stock.

Serve with those great pitas you just baked off !!!! 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Sourdough English Muffins

Inspired by kjknits EM recipe I decide to try it out.  I don't have a cutter so I just cut them into square shapes with my dough scraper.  They turned out nice.  My wife, who eats the Thomas brand regularly, also seemed to like them too.  Thanks to kjkniots for the recipe.  They came out with holes on one side after slicing for some reason.  Maybe the side that hit the hot pan first got bubbles or cause them to go away?No I don't think I will be buying an EM cutter either - unless I find one at Goodwill.

These are delicious toasted with butter and home made 6P Jam ( prickly pear, pineapple, plum, pear & pomegranate)  Can't buy that at the store :-)

 

yankeedave's picture
yankeedave

Adding vital wheat gluten to whole wheat flour

All I have on hand at the moment is finely ground WW flour. I would like to make some baguettes (I know they won't be "authentic" with 100% WW flour, but that's the shape I want). I've never made any 100% WW bread before, and I don't want them to come out dense. Does it make sense to add vital wheat gluten? The WW flour was milled from hard wheat, and supposedly the issue with most WW flour is not low protein, it's the effect of the bran cutting into the gluten strands. If that's what's going on, then it seems that adding VWG wouldn't help, yet part of me thinks that it might.

I've seen some of these things touched upon in other posts but not this specific question. If it has been covered, sorry for not finding it. But the basic question is, if the reason WW bread tends to be dense is the bran, not the lack of protein, does it make sense to add VWG?

Oh, one more thing - I know some people have said you need to do a long soak to soften the bran, but let's assume that you're somewhat pressed for time and would like to get the loaves done in a few hours. Not the best way to make bread, I know, but humor me here. Thanks.

mpiasec's picture
mpiasec

king arthur hamberger rolls

just made king arthurs hambergers buns, they seem to be a little heavy.  Can you tell me why?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Make your own Greek yogurt

Make your own Greek yogurt and then use the drippings to make great bread by substituting the yogurt whey water for the water in your bread.

dablues's picture
dablues

Chinese Cheesecake?

Does anyone know what type of dessert this is?  I asked someone at the China Star Super Buffet and they say it's cheesecake.  It doesn't taste like any chessecake that I've had before.  The inside is light and airy and I think a hint of lemon is in there but don't know what other ingredients could be there.  The outside is Phyllo.  I've looked all over the internet to find some sort of recipe but haven't found anything that resembles this.  I hope the photos are ok.  I sliced one in half and took a picture to show what the filling is like

 

 

 

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

The Dark Side Attacks: 70% rye plus wheat / emmer / spelt

Mischbrot variations

In earlier experiments with breads having a higher percentage of rye flour I found that adding spelt, emmer or semolina complemented the rye very well.

With this bake I wanted to compare the effect of substituting the wheat part with emmer and spelt in breads with 70% rye. The flours are all from Shipton Mill.

The outcome:



I used my tried and tested Mischbrot formula as a base, this time using a rye starter with 100% hydration. The starter is made with dark rye, while the remaining rye in the formula is light rye.

Here the formula:

Straight formula

Percent

Amount(g)

Amount (oz)

Dark Rye

24

108

3.83

Light Rye

46

208

7.33

Bread flour

30

136

4.78

Or light spelt flour

30

136

4.78

Or wholegrain emmer flour

30

136

4.78

salt

2

9

0.32

water

75

339

11.96

yield

177

800

28.22

 

 

 

 

Rye sour

 

 

 

Dark rye flour

24

108

3.83

Water

24

108

3.83

Mature starter

2.4

11

0.38

Yield

50.4

227

8.04

 

 

 

 

Dough

 

 

 

Light Rye

46

208

7.33

Bread flour

30

136

4.78

Or light spelt flour

30

136

4.78

Or wholegrain emmer flour

30

136

4.78

Salt

2

9

0.32

Water

51

231

8.13

Rye sour

48

217

7.65

Yield

177

800

28.22

At the current cooler temperatures (about 23C / 73F in my kitchen) the starter took 16 hours to mature.
With 70% rye the doughs / pastes are very sticky and require only a short mix/knead so that all materials are mixed well.

After 100 minutes of fermentation at 23C / 73F I shaped rounds with very wet hands (in mid-air), and put t hem into baskets (floured with light rye) for the final rest..After 60 minutes the rounds showed cracks, a sign that they are ready for the bake.

The bake (on a stone, with steam) started at maximum temperature (ca.  240C / 464F), after 15 minutes I turned the loaves and lowered the temperature to 210C / 410F, After another 20 minutes the bread was ready.

I am very happy with oven spring and bloom. All three breads performed equally well and were indistinguishable from the outside.

After a day I cut into the loaves. The crumb is quite similar in all three loaves, the bread containing wholegrain emmer  is a bit darker and more dense.(The wheat bread got a bit of a shadow - bad photography!)

Although the crumb looks fairly dense, the breads actually feel light.

The crust could be thicker, but that's my oven – not much I can do about this at the moment.

The taste of the three breads is also very similar – quite complex with rye dominating, and a distinctive tangy after-taste. The emmer bread has the most complex taste.

There are a few things I would like to try with this formula:
1. using all wholegrain flours
2. going back to the original German way: using all medium rye and refined flours (which would be called ”Berliner Landbrot”)
3. Reducing the amount of rye sour and using some of the wheat/emmer/spelt in a stiff starter as a second preferment
4. using a wheat/emmer/spelt poolish as a second preferment
5. adding spices

Lots to do!
Juergen

walker8476's picture
walker8476

High Hydration and Poor Oven Spring

I find the higher the hydration the less oven spring I get.  At 60% I find the dough won't rise at all in the oven but at 40% it rises about 2cm.

I'm making just a basic loaf with bread flour, yeast, water and salt.  Should this be the case or is there something wrong?

Matt Edy's picture
Matt Edy

Egg substitute in sweet bun dough

Wondered if anyone knew of a substitute for eggs in a sweet bun dough (for hot cross buns)?

Finding that eggs in dough cause the bread to dry up and go hard very quick....

Many thanks

 

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