The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Most bookmarked

  • Pin It
Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yet Another Whole Wheat Multigrain! (Recipe Added)

I wanted to bake under a pyrex, and an ss bowl this time. The boule on the Right was under a pyrex bowl, and the Batard was under the stainless bowl.


My adapted recipe of Hamelman's Formula:


Total Formula:


Bread Flour: 1lb  (50%)


Whole Wheat Flour: 1lb (50%)


Mixed Grains: 5.8 oz (18%)


Water: 1lb , 10oz (78%)


Salt: 0.7 oz (1 T + 0.5Tsp) (2.2%)


Yeast: (1tsp) instant yeast (1%)


Honey: 1oz (1 T, 0.5tsp) (3%)


Levain:


Bread Flour: 3.8 oz (100%)


Water: 4.8 oz (125%)


Starter: 1.5 T (20%)


Soaker:


Grains (Cracked oates, or wheat or Rye, Sunflower seeds, Flax seeds, Buckwheat): 5.8oz (100%)


Water : 6.9 oz (120%)


Salt: 0.5 tsp


Final Dough:


Bread Flour: 12.2 oz


Wholewheat Flour: 1lb


Water: 12.5 oz


Salt: 1 T


Yeast: 0.1oz  (1tsp)


Honey: (1T + 1tsp)


Soaker: All


Levain: All


 





Neat Results, but the chronic charred bottom remains a challenge i have to put up with in My gas oven.


The loaves could have used more proofing time, but i bet the premature levain i mixed in had something to do with it.


 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hazelnut Sweet Rolls

Hello, To celebrate the Hazelnut Harvest which happens this time of year, I wanted to make some sweet rolls, using hazelnuts.

These are rolls made with Basic Sweet Dough. with Nut Filling, from Baking Artisan Pastries and Breads by Ciril Hitz.
This is a nice sweet dough recipe and includes some lemon zest for an added dimension of flavor.

Hazelnut flour was used in the filling, and the rolls were glazed (icing sugar + a decent measure of Frangelico liqueur
+ a bit of cream + a bit of pure vanilla extract + a teeny-tiny pinch of salt).


This recipe produced 12 decent-sized rolls, baked in a 9x13 pan, with some extra dough left over; 
the roll ends were baked in small ring molds.

These rolls were good and tasty (I really like the liqueur-spiked glaze!).    Regards, breadsong



AK_Home_Baker's picture
AK_Home_Baker

New to Sourdough !!!

Hello Everyone! Happy Weekend :) 


So I am in great need of help...I am not new to bread making and baking but am very new to sourdough...I did all the wrong things first, but after some reading and getting the mistakes out of the way. I am ready to try again :) My biggest problem is that I live in Fairbanks Alaska and my kitchen (except in the summer) is never above 65 degrees maybe ...maybe 70 if I work at it... If I store my starter in the fridge it would take at least two to three days before it would come to room temp and bubble :( I am going to start a new batch today..and am thinking of keeping it inside a glass jar covered with a cheesecloth top inside of a insulated lunch box with the lid open...I am not going to use yeast...do you think that the flour and water will work like that alone in my conditions? also any tips cold weather feeding and maybe being able to leave it out all the time? I need to bake every three days so by the time I feed and fridge and re - temp and bake its easier to just leave it out ?


Thanks Guys! any advise at all would be a blessing :) want to make the most healthy choices for my family and this type of bread is the way to go.. I have to make this work !

akupond's picture
akupond

fresh vs aged flour

http://www.gourmet.com/video adventures with ruth, ep 3

richard bertinet says "fresh flour is bad", and that he likes it to be at least three months old.
can someone explain the reasoning behind this.

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

10/15/10 - Pain Au Levain with Scallions and Sesame Oil...

Inspired by one of Shiao-ping's early bakes...  I'll post a description shortly...  For now, here's a 360 degree view of the loaf...  It's cooling now, so I'll have to post crumbshot pics tomorrow...


Enjoy!


Tim








Recipe:


500g AP


300g Water


150g Sourdough Starter @ 100% Hydration


12g Kosher Salt


7 Scallions/Green Onions


Sesame Oil


962g Dough weight not including scalions/sesame oil.


 


Method:


10/15/10


10:00am - Feed storage sourdough starter 100g AP and 100g water, leave on counter covered.  Should increase by 50% in 2-3 hours.


12:40pm - Mix all ingredients in large bowl with wooden spoon.  When a rough dough forms, squish out all the lumps with wet hands, cover and let rest.  This should take no more than 5 minutes.


2:24pm - Stretch and fold dough in bowl, cover and let rest.


3:29pm - Stretch and fold dough in bowl, cover and let rest.


4:20pm - Stretch and fold dough in bowl, cover and let rest.


5:30pm - Stretch and fold dough in bowl, cover and let rest.


6:00pm - Wash, dry, thinly slice scallions, place in bowl and set aside.


6:30pm - Turn dough out onto lightly floured surface.  Stretch dough out like a pizza.  Brush dough lightly with sesame oil, and distribute scallions on top of dough.  Roll dough into log, then with the seam side up, roll dough up into a snail.  Please seam side up in floured banneton, place into plastic bag.  Proof for 3 hrs.


9:00pm - Arrange baking stone on 2nd rack from bottom along with steam pan (loaf pan filled with lava rocks, fill halfway with water).  Preheat oven to 500F with convection.


9:45pm - Turn off convection.  Take banneton out of plastic bag, sprinkle boule lightly with flour.  Lightly flour peel.  Turn dough out onto peel, slash lengtwise (along the roll), place into oven directly on stone.  Bake 500F for 10 minutes.  After the 10 minutes, remove the steam pan, turn oven down to 450F and bake for another 35 minutes.  After, turn oven off, leave loaf in for another 10 minutes.  Cool completely before slicing and eating.


Sent to Susan @ Yeastspotting on 10/17/10


 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Krakow Bagels recipe online

Stan posted this elsewhere here but it is kind of buried at the end of a thread, so I wanted to repeat his message here:


The Wall Street Journal Online picked up our recipe and credits the book ... you can find it at http://online.wsj.com/article_email/SB10001424052748703794104575545843564259642-lMyQjAxMTAwMDEwMjExNDIyWj.html


Congrats, Stan and Norm.  We're all looking forward to seeing all of your hard work come to fruition!

Yuval35's picture
Yuval35

Brioche question

Hello,


recentlly i am trying to improve my brioche skils.


I made 2 classic brioche receips but unfortuantlly the dough wasn't rise enough.


finally i found another receipe from KAF which was very good in a matter of texture but the flavors was poor( in my opinion).


anyway i was searching the web for other brioche receips and found several differences and methods.


1. some of them are not using any liquid instead of butter and eggs and some of them using around 1\4 to 1\2 water\milk\orange juice.


    the receips whice i faild with them was without water. the KAF was with water which was easier to handle.


2. another issue is the butter temparature. some of them insist to use cold butter and some of them using  soft butter.


can anyone put some light about those methods ?

Mebake's picture
Mebake

1st try: Peter Reinhart's "Struan"

For a change, i decided to lay a side my beloved "BREAD" by Hamelman, and go back to my first baking companion: "Peter Reinhart's" Whole GRain BReads.


I always wanted to bake the Struan, but the laborious and tedious preparation for this bread deterred me. Yesterday, i took a deep breath and gave it a try.


The Recipe (750 g loaf) calls for butter, sweetner, and cooked and uncooked soaked grains. This is a 100% wholewheat bread.


I deviated in two places: 1) folded the dough once after the first 30 minutes of the total 1 hour bulk fermentation. 2) I did not add the extra flour, so the dough was wetter than suggested by Reinhart.





Now that i did Baked it, i realized that i should have either added the extra flour called for, or shortened the final 1 hour final proofing time to 30 minutes max. The Loaf was overproofed.


The taste of the bread is absolutely superb, sweet soft interior with chewy soft grains, and wheaty after taste.


 Highly recommended!!

midwest baker's picture
midwest baker

Mediterranean Rolls

http://www.evatoneva.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=234:mediterraneanbreads&catid=6:pitki&Itemid=8


This recipe for Mediterrainean Rolls looks really good. I haven't made them yet but I finally have what I think is a good translation to English.The original recipe is at the above link. The amount of yeast looks high so I'd cut that down. The salt looks low but parmesan is salty so it's probably okay. Thought you might want to have the translation.


 



Mediterrainean Rolls


400-450 g flour
300 g  water
100 g Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
7 g instant yeast
2 tsp honey
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp rosemary
50 g olive oil (about 4 T)

Dissolve yeast and honey in 150 ml of warm water, cover and leave in a warm place to rise for 10-15 minutes.
In a bowl sift flour and salt, add the finely grated cheese, stir.
Make a well and pour the yeast and remaining water, Knead to a soft dough.
Shape it into balls and place in a greased bowl, cover it with cloth and leave in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume.
Pour the risen dough on work surface, cut it to 8 equal parts.
Shape rolls, place them in greased or parchment paper covered baking tray.
Allow rolls to rise for 20-30 minutes.
Brush them with olive oil, sprinkle with rosemary.
Bake them 20-30 minutes in preheated oven to 350 degrees F.


Mary


www.midwestbaker.blogspot.com

Yuval35's picture
Yuval35

Brioche Question

Hello,


recentlly i am trying to improve my brioche skils.


I made 2 classic brioche receips but unfortuantlly the dough wasn`t rise enough.


finally i found another receipe from KAF which was very good in a matter of texture but the flavors was poor( in my opinion).


anyway i was searching the web for other brioche receips and found several differences and methods.


1. some of them are not using any liquid instead of butter and eggs and some of them using around 1\4 to 1\2 water\milk\orange juice.


    the receips whice i faild with them was without water. the KAF was with water which was easier to handle.


2. another issue is the butter temparature. some of them insist to use cold butter and some of them using  soft butter.


can anyone put some light about those methods ?

Pages