The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Most bookmarked

  • Pin It
ehanner's picture
ehanner

Rich Cinnamon Toast Bread Suggestions

My daughter asked me to bring some rich cinnamon bread to substitute for French Toast next week at the Easter brunch she is hosting. She likes the idea of using the toaster instead of the mess and time to fry soaked bread for 18 people.


I'm hoping someone will have a favorite enriched cinnamon bread they will suggest. It has to be able to go in the toaster, so not a rolled up cinnamon bun. Thank you in advance. I don't usually make sweets like this so I'm not experienced in the recipe selection.


Eric

qahtan's picture
qahtan

recipe for bread pudding ??????

 How does one give a recipe for bread pudding when it's made up as you go along nothing measured. 


the last one I made posted picture couple days ago.


I had a couple bags of bread crumbs in the freezer,  some w/w bread and white had gone a bit stale so I buzzed in in the Cuisinart, bagged it and froze it. I dunno about 4/5 cups I suppose. 


 When thawed I  added a cup raw brown sugar, about 1/2 cup warm honey about 3/4 cup melted butter, 4 eggs, a lot of spice, allspice and mixed spice, about 1/2 cup chopped dates, lots currants, raisins, and sultanas and enough milk to make it all bind togather, I let it stand about 2 hours to soak up milk., put mixture into greased pan  good sprinkle sugar on top and baked it 400 till knife came out clean,,,,,


sorry it is so vague, but it is a make it up as you go along.....


qahtan

artisanfood's picture
artisanfood

Real Bread in the Lake District

There is a great Artisan bread scene in Cumbria, home of the Lake District. The lead article this month in our Artisan-food magazine covers a number of them, plus there is a great video from the morning shift at the Staff of Life bakery in Kendal, where Simon created a unique loaf just for us. 


http://content.yudu.com/Library/A1n9uq/Artisanfood/resources/4.htm


Let us know what you think.


Martin - www.artisan-food.com


 


 

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Colomba with poolish

Hi,


I implemented this recipe for the classical easter cake "colomba" from an italian pastry chef


http://www.cookaround.com/yabbse1/showthread.php?t=110276


but with some adaptions. The recipe calls for a stiff sourdough, something that I really detest because it requires many more attentions that I want to dedicate it and because it involves a lot of risks for the taste (acidity is always around the corner, not something you will like in a cake).


I replaced the stiff sourdough with two consecutive poolishes amounting to the same amount of flour; the water in excess was subtracted from the first dough. Moreover I started with my rye sourdough (100% hydratation), but in many other occasions my friends and I used a plain white wheat or durum wheat sourdough without the slightest problem.


Salt is essential to relent the enzymatic rection that deteriorates the gluten, thus I moved it from the second to the first dough. When I didn't I had a lot of failures.


This kind of cakes requires the use of a very strong flours. I used a "canadian" one (in italy they are called "manitoba", W >= 350).


The original recipe amounts to 1.5 KG; I rescaled the ingredients to get to 1 KG.


First poolish: 13 gr sourdough, 13 of flour (depends on your starter, mine was rye), 14 of water. Let triple.


Second poolish: add 40 gr of water and 40 of very high gluten/canadian flour. Let triple.



First dough:


flour 260 gr
butter 70 gr
sugar 70 gr
2 egg yolks
water 80+ gr (I used 80 gr of egg whites, instead)


salt 4 gr


mix water, eggs, sugar and salt, dissolve very well and add 100 gr of flour; whip to create a smooth cream, add the poolish, mix well, add the remaining flour and work to get a smooth dough, add the butter in 2 turns and knead until the dough is perfectly smooth and elastic. It's sticky, better use a kneading machine or a bread machine (as I did). Let double in a warm environment.



Second dough:


mix 20 gr of sugar (I used 50) with 60 gr of flour and knead them in the dough, add 2 egg yolks (one at a time) and 1 teaspoon of honey, mix until they are perfectly embedded, add 55 gr of butter and knead the dough until it's perfectly elastic. Add some vanilla extract, some orange zest ( I used the grated zest of two lemons, instead) and 200 gr of candied orange zest, mix until they are perfectly distributed and let the dough rest for one hour.



Fold the dough and fill the mould as explained in the pictures in the linked article and let rise in a warm environment until the dough gets 2 cm below the border of the mould.


Cover the surface with the almond glaze (I changed it: 100 gr of almond finely chopped with 20 gr of durum flour and 120 of sugar, then mixed with enough egg white to get a very very dense cream), spread some almond on top of the glaze and cook at 180°C for 50 minutes.



This is the last I made, of the many;)



Unfortunately the glaze cracked because of the incredible oven spring.



 



 


The texture was a bit of a disappointment because it didn't come out as open-crumbed as in many other occasions. Taste is wondeful ;)



 

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Rosemary Olive Oil Bread (with seeds)

I saw Floyd's posting on this recipe.  Wanted to try out.  I also saw some seeded recipes,  and wanted to add in the seeds. I need some advice here,  as the the bread turned out a little dense - see the crumb below.




Ingredients:
Preferment
125g All Purpose Flour 85g water 2.5g salt 2g yeast
Day 1:  Mix all and leave rise for 1 hour,  then refrigerate it overnight.
Final Dough
350g Bread Flour 225g water 40g extra virgin olive oil 5g rosemary leaves (I used dried) 7.5g salt 2.5g yeast All of the preferment
Seeds (I added these in as I wanted a seeded bread)
50g Sunflower seed  20g Sesame seeds
Bake sunflower seed for 15 minutes in oven at 150 degree celsius. Turn the seeds occasionally. Fry sesame seeds for about 5 minutes over fire.  Stir constantly till brown.  Put in a bowl and cover overnight.

Day 2:  Mix dough first,  and add in preferment,  knead well.  I added the seeds last after I've kneaded the dough well. Mix the dough and seeds well together. (Should I have waited after the 1st rise to add in the seeds?)
Rising/Proofing:  Rise for 1 1/2 hours, (Floyd suggest a 3 hour bulk rising with 2 folds,  which I should have followed).  1 fold and shape.  Proof for 1 1/2 hours. (The dough have doubled well,  my first rise should have been longer??)
Bake:  Steam the oven at 250 degrees celsius,  and  bake at 230 degrees celsius for 50 minutes,  and bring down the temperature to 200 degree celsius for 20 minutes.  (did I bake a little too long?)
Looking for some advice please?
Jenny

ananda's picture
ananda

Competing in the Louis Lesaffre Cup

 


Taking Part in a Baking Competition


Way back in early January, not long after I first started posting on TFL, I found an invitation in my e-mails to compete in what becomes the baking world cup: La Coupe du Monde de Bolangerie, next taking place in 2012..


At the international qualification stage, this is known as the Louis Lesaffre Cup http://www.coupelouislesaffre.com/ with the European part set to take place in Paris in 2011.   This sounded quite interesting, so I thought I'd give it a go.   An e-mail enquiry suggested I would have to make baguettes, a tinned loaf, and a speciality loaf of my own.   I decided to give it a go, thinking the UK heats were to be held in May, or, June.   By that time my teaching commitments will be less, and I should have completed the second module for my MSc in Food policy.   So, I entered.


I didn't hear anything more for a few weeks, except confirmation that I was the first applicant, but I would definitely be taking part.   Right at the beginning of March I received a phone call from Nick Townend of BFP Wholesale [yeast company owned by Lesaffre here in the UK], informing me the Competition was set for sometime between the 20th and 24th March, at the NEC in Birmingham, live at the Baking Industry Exhibition.   Let's just say that this event is HUGE!   I'm in the midst of trying to get an assignment complete for my MSc, and I'm already behind schedule, needing a week's extension.   Also, I'd put no plans in place to publicise my plans and score some publicity for Newcastle College, where I lecture.


OK; well I'd better not panic, it'll be just fine, I resolve!   Better get some practice in, and, sort out some materials.   I contacted my colleagues in Kent [see: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16151/working-french-flour ]and they agreed to post up 10kg of their wonderful T65 Campteclair Farine de Tradition.   I knew this would be a score on the competition, and had no problem getting permission from the judges to use this flour.   I'd put in quite a lot of work to develop a Caraway Rye Bread with Blackstrap Molasses [see: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16273/carawy-rye-bread-black-strap-molasses-superwet-ciabatta-too ] and thought this would be a great choice for my own loaf.   For the tinned bread, I had plans to use a seed soaker with a mix of wholemeal and white bread flours.


Then the Rules were finally published on the 12th March!   Baguettes were indeed required.   One dough using 7kg of flour; half of this to make traditional hand moulded baguettes, the other half to process through a moulding machine.   Finished weight of 240g, I calculated this would give me 36 baguettes!   And, I'd only got 10kg of flour in the first place.   I double-checked, but was told I could only make one dough.   I thought I may get away with a dough using Campteclair for the traditional baguettes, then another dough using industrial flour T55 for the machined products.   No go on this.   Tinned loaves:   3 x 800g finished weight of White Farmhouse, White Sandwich Tin, and Wholemeal.   You can't get much more ordinary than this, but I knew I could at least use sponge and dough methods to get some interesting flavours.   The loaf of choice was also something of a letdown.   Clearly the judges had made moves to keep the competition as "English" as possible...you can all draw your own conclusions on what that implies!   Two from Cottage, Bloomer and Cob loaves; 3 x 800g and 400g finished weights; all white flour.   A minimum of 1 hour bulk ferment was stipulated, but no mention made of overnight fermentation.   For all these products, Lesaffre bread improvers were available, as were their dry sour preparations!!


Well, I was starting to feel somewhat disheartened by now; seriously I was thinking I should pull out.   But a hotel room was booked and paid for by Lesaffre, and I was just about psyched up for the competition side of the whole event.   I needed to talk to some colleagues, big-style.   Thank you to Eric Hanner of TFL who from this point on was of sterling support.   My line manager at work also stepped up and gave me loads of positives.   It was great to have word from Jeffrey Hamelman, explaining some of the rationale behind aspects of the rules [he will be judging in Paris, I guess], but also obviously uninspired by the English choices of bread available to me.


So I frantically began e-mailing through to Nick Townend, establishing whatever I could to know it would all work on the day.   Quite why I had thought the event was in May/June, I really have no idea at all now.   I did 3 days of test baking on 15th, 16th and 17th March, in my bakery kitchen, but teaching a host of different classes at the same time; so, it was extremely stressful, and not all my products turned out how I wanted them.   Still, I had a load of notes, and the confidence in the methods used and my own knowledge and skill to believe I had everything there to make it all work over the upcoming weekend.


I had a trip to Nottinghamshire on Thursday 18th March to visit "The School of Artisan Food".   I had a table seat reserved on the train, so spent the 4 hours tapping away on my wife's laptop to complete all the recipe/formula and methods for each of the breads I was going to make.   I had a great day out visiting what is a wholly exciting new venture, and, I got all this planning work completed too.


Back to College on Friday, to teach a practical baking class, and gather a whole load of equipment and materials together to take to Birmingham.   I slept badly on Friday night, and was up by 5am tapping away on my pc, and catching up with the latest from Eric to help me through.   The drive to Birmingham is over 250 miles from where we live in the very far north of England.   We made very good time, and checked in to the hotel by mid afternoon.   My wife, Alison, went shopping, and I went off to the NEC to make my starter doughs for the next day.


I arrived at the NEC, eventually checked into the right Exhibition Hall with all my stuff, and it was bedlam.   Everyone was working like crazy to have the Hall set up for the next day.   Our "live area" was hardly in any state at all.   There was no baguette moulder, and the equipment available was not really set up, and we had to share it with the Bakels/Rondo team doing live demonstrations in the same cordon.   Well, no machine-moulded baguettes anyway.   Having met all the co-ordinators who were supporting us, the 3 competitors, we then had one hour to make all our overnight ferments.   I had 4 to make!


Anyway, mission accomplished and back to the hotel.   Alison and I made an exit from the hotel to a decent restaurant, so we could get a break from all things bakery competition for a while at least.   I drank just a few beers, and ate some good food, but we went straight to bed on return.   I had an early rise, as the Competition kicked off at 7am.


We were there early and away by 06:50, with 8 hours to complete all our loaves.   Counting against all of us was the equipment.   One of the ovens was low-crown, and we had a lot of tinned breads to make; there was a massive shortage of proving space; we had only one spiral mixer between the 3 of us; the benches we were given were absolutely tiny, and far from robust.   And I discovered the wholemeal flour we had been given was really not up to much.


Well, we were on view to one and all, and I want to say thanks to all those who came past and took such an interest in what I was doing: especially Mr. Tony Jenkins from Soothills Bakers in Hampshire.   He was fascinated that a baker had turned up at a bakery competition prepared to make very simple products using long fermentation methods only, and no improvers.   I was glad to find I wasn't the only one.   Stephen Salt from Tameside College, near Manchester, was on a similar mission; the other baking competitor was Andrew Iyare from London.   There were 2 competitors on the following day, one being Emmanuel Hadijandreou from Judges Bakery, the other was Wayne Caddy who is a bakery consultant based in Rotherham.   I met up with Emmanuel after the competition, which was great; I've been wanting to meet him for a good while.   I know Wayne from my time at Leeds Thomas Danby, as he studied there as well, although some years before me.


The competition was pretty stressful at times.   The lack of equipment was difficult for all of us, and it was difficult to stay organised throughout.   We all managed to work well together, and the support from the co-ordinators on the day was much appreciated.   Andrew had finished in very good time.   Stephen baked his baguettes last of all, then he was finished too.   So I had the run of the ovens at the end, which was a bonus.   This was when I discovered that the Tom Chandley deck oven was low crown, so my tinned loaves were getting a bit stuck on the top heat bars!   I'd taken longer than the others quite deliberately; this had given me 4 hours to prove the baguettes in the chiller following a one hour bulk fermentation.


The Judging Panel had emerged, and I met up with Colin Lomax from Rank Hovis again.   I met him a few years ago at one of Rank's mills in Selby, North Yorkshire.   The current NA President was on the panel, with Peter Lonnican from Blackpool, and Sarah Auton, who had been helping to co-ordinate the whole thing.   All 4 were very supportive, and full of positive comments for our hard work.   I set my 18 baguettes on the sole of the oven with a trusty baguette peel specially made for me at the College, using some coarsely ground semolina from a local organic mill in Northumberland.   I had hoped for a little more proof, but they were so easy to handle, and baked up so crispy in the best deck oven I've worked on in years.   "Best bread of the day" was Colin Lomax's comment.   It was worth competing for that moment alone.   I didn't win the event.   That honour went to Wayne; my congratulations to him.   He gained the place in the UK team for bread baker.   The other places are for a Vienoisserie expert, and for someone to do a decorative dough piece.


I've attached a load of photos from the day, and all the recipes and methods used.   I've already given thanks for support above, but would like to add to this list.   My wife, Alison, took all these photos, bar one obvious one.   She accompanied me all the way to Birmingham and back, and supported and encouraged me all the way.   Also, Mary and Nigel in supplying me the special T65 flour, gave me a chance to put over at least one really top class product.   The white cobs were very fine too, and the sandwich loaves were just about up to scratch.   The wholemeal was poor, and I learnt a lot from this.   I would always take my own preferred choice of flours to a competition in future.   Trying to achieve 72% hydration, and mix in a planetary machine were big mistakes; the BFP flour was not the same spec as the Carrs Mill Race Wholemeal I use in College.   The bloomers "got away on me".   They tasted fantastic, but looked a little bit too ragged.


I'd made 52 loaves in a pretty stressful situation..but, I d had a thoroughly good time and felt totally at home in this rather strange environment.   I want to do this again; it was a lot of fun.   Next time I'll be a lot more organised in the run-in!


 


 


WHOLEMEAL TINNED BREAD


 



Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Recipe [grams]

1. Quarter Sponge

 

 

 

Wholemeal Flour

25

1750

875

Water

17

1190

595

Fresh Yeast

0.2

14

7

TOTAL

42.2

2954

1477

 

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

 

Quarter Sponge [from above]

42.2

2954

1477

Wholemeal Flour

75

5250

2625

Salt

1.8

126

63

Fresh Yeast

2.5

175

87.5

White Fat

1.8

126

63

Water

55[max]

3850

1925

TOTAL

178.3

12481

6240.5

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt, fat and yeast and mix the final dough 2 minutes on first speed, and 6 - 8 minutes on second speed.   DDT 24°C
  • Bulk Ferment, covered in an oil-lined container for 40 minutes, ambient.   Knock back and rest 10 minutes.
  • Prepare tins, and scale and divide the dough into 950g pieces.   Mould round and rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape and pan the loaves
  • Proof at 31°C, 85% rH  for approx 1 hour; ensure oven set and pre-heated
  • Bake to the following profile: Use a deck oven set at 235°C, top heat 6 and bottom heat 8.   Use steam set at 2 and keep the damper closed for the first 25 minutes.   Check after 18 minutes, turn the loaf pans round if necessary, and drop the heat to 225°C.   Open the dampers after 25 minutes, drop the heat to 220°C and bake a further 5 - 8 minutes.
  • De-pan and cool on wires.

 

WHITE COB AND BLOOMER

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Eighth Sponge

 

 

Strong White Flour

12.5

875

Water

7.5

525

Fresh Yeast

0.1

7

TOTAL

20.1

1407

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Eighth Sponge [from above]

20.1

1407

Strong White Flour

87.5

6125

Salt

1.8

126

Fresh Yeast

2.4

168

White Fat

1.0

100

Water

55.5 [max for 63% hydration]

3675 [60%]

3885 [63%]

TOTAL

168.3

11811

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt, fat and yeast and mix the final dough 3 minutes on first speed, and 3½ - 5 minutes on second speed.   DDT 24°C
  • Bulk Ferment, covered in an oil-lined container for 1¼ hours, ambient.   Knock back and rest a further 10 mins.
  • Prepare trays with silicone paper dusted with semolina for bloomers, and banneton with white flour for cobs, and scale and divide the dough into 950g pieces for large laves and 480g pieces for small.   Mould round and rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape the loaves, tray up the bloomers, and turn the cobs upside down into the banneton.   Recipe yields 4 large and 3 small of each product.
  • Proof at 31°C, 85% rH  for approx 1 hour; ensure oven set and pre-heated.
  • Bake to the following profile: Use a deck oven set at 225°C, top heat 7 and bottom heat 5.   Use steam set at 4 and keep the damper closed for the first 15 minutes.   Use a peel to set the loaves on the sole of the oven; bloomers on silicone, cut whole surface with angled cuts; cobs tipped onto the peel then transfer to oven after cutting, cross shape over whole floured surface.   Check after 20 minutes, to see if the small loaves are baked,   Open the dampers and bake a further 8 minutes.
  • De-pan and cool on wires.

 

WHITE TIINNED BREAD: FARMOUSE and SANDWICH LOAVES

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Third Sponge

 

 

Strong White Flour

33.3

2331

Water

20

1400

Fresh Yeast

0.3

21

TOTAL

53.6

3752

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Third Sponge [from above]

53.6

3752

Strong White Flour

66.7

4669

Salt

1.8

126

Fresh Yeast

1.7

119

White Fat

1.8

126

Water

43[max]

3010

TOTAL

168.6

11802

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt, fat and yeast and mix the final dough 3 minutes on first speed, and 3½ - 5 minutes on second speed.   DDT 24°C
  • Bulk Ferment, covered in an oil-lined container for 40 minutes, ambient.   Knock back and rest 10 minutes.
  • Prepare tins, and scale and divide the dough into 12 x 950g pieces.   Mould round and rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape and pan the loaves; makes 6 as sandwich loaves and 6 as farmhouse
  • Proof at 31°C, 85% rH for approx 1 hour; ensure oven set and pre-heated.   Be ready to bake the sandwich ahead of the farmhouse, as these loaves do not need full proof.   Lid the sandwich loaves first; dust the farmhouse loaf tops with white flour, and use a single slash, the full length of the loaf.
  • Bake to the following profile: Use a deck oven set at 235°C, top heat 6 and bottom heat 8.   Use steam set at 2 and keep the damper closed for the first 25 minutes.   Check after 18 minutes, turn the loaf pans round if necessary, and drop the heat to 225°C.   Open the dampers after 25 minutes, drop the heat to 220°C and bake a further 5 - 8 minutes.
  • De-pan and cool on wires.

 

TRADITIONAL BAGUETTES MADE WITH A POOLISH

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Poolish

 

 

Campteclair T65 Farine de Tradition

33.3

2331

Water

33.3

2331

Fresh Yeast

0.3

21

TOTAL

66.9

4683

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Poolish [from above]

66.9

4683

Campteclair T65 Farine de Tradition

66.7

4669

Salt

1.8

126

Fresh Yeast

0.9

63

Water

32.7

2289

TOTAL

169

11830

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt and yeast and mix the final dough for 9 minutes on first speed.   DDT 24°C.
  • Scale the dough into 2 equal portions.   Bulk ferment both portions in oil-lined, covered bowls for 40 minutes.
  • Scale the first portion into 18 x 325g pieces and mould round.   Rest covered for 10 minutes.   Meanwhile, scale the other dough portion into 18 x 325g pieces, and mould round.   Store these covered in the chiller for 2 hours.
  • Once rested, roll out the 18 pieces from the first batch of dough, using a baguette moulder, to 60cm.   Place these onto stick wires and set to prove; 35°C, 85% rH, for 45 mins to 1 hour approx.   Use 6 diagonal cuts just prior to baking.
  • Bake as follows: deck oven, full steam; 240°C, top 6.5, bottom 5, for 20 minutes.   Turn the heat down to 225°C, for 5 minutes.   Open the damper and turn the heat to 215°C and bake a further 5 - 7 minutes.
  • Cool on wires
  • For the second batch, gradually and carefully, roll each piece out by hand to 60cm.   Set to prove, ambient, en coûche and well covered with cloth and plastic.   Use semolina, as dust, as required.   Try to keep the seal of each baguette on the bottom.   Prove approx 1 hour.   Cut each loaf using a grignette, 6 diagonal slashes.   Set on the sole of the oven using a baguette peel.

Bake profile: as for the first portion of baguettes.   Cool on wires

 

KMIAA's picture
KMIAA

DLX or Bosch

I'm interested in a second mixer and am undecided on the DLX & Bosch.  I've read reviews on sites on both but am still not sure which one.  Anyone who ones the Bosch & DLX, if you can give me your input on the machine, it would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

20100324 Mini Oven's 100% Rye - by Yippee

Decades ago, my elementary school teacher Miss Yeung wrote down 'Simplicity is Beauty' in my graduation autograph book.  Even though I knew every word in this phrase, it was too complicated for a 6th grader who was then indulging in Hello Kitty and Melody dolls to fully appreciate the profound meanings behind it and I haven't given it much thought since. Today, the same phrase just dawned on me when I completed Mini Oven's 100% rye. Isn't this bread a true reflection of the message my teacher was trying to convey years ago?  It's a simple loaf made with Mini's magic ratio. The moist, airy, glossy, and flavorful crumb is the beauty I've witnessed and experienced. 'Yummy' would be an understatement to describe her bread. In order to appreciate the combination of the complexity of flavors and the spongy-yet-substantive texture, you've got to try it yourself!


Last time, I was uncertain what my relationship with rye would be when I made the 90% rye loaf.  Remember, we're Asians and we did not grow up with and are not even familiar with rye breads.  In fact, my kids had refused to eat rye bread again after trying a terrible sourdough rye loaf from a famous local boulangerie. Hear this:  "We have a personal grudge against rye bread!!! We won't eat it again!!!" That's how bad it was but that has changed. This time, these 100% rye loaves have received accolades from my entire family and we're in love with them!  I sincerely thank Mini Oven for her time and generosity in sharing 'trade secrets' unconditionally and it has made my first 100% rye experience very successful and enjoyable.


The details of procedures are discussed in Mini's blog.  I doubled her formula and adapted to a 3-bulid, 50% hydration firm starter. A summary of my formula is as follows:


 


 


 


The specifications of the flour I used are as follows:



Approximately, slightly more than half of the dough I prepared went into an 8x4x4 Pullman pan, which was filled to about 1" below the rim. Next time this amount should be reduced to make a perfect Pullman loaf.  The remaining dough went into a greased Pyrex bowl.  Fermentation took place at 80F for 8 hours.  


 


I removed my baking stone and replaced it with a sheet pan prior to baking.  These loaves were covered and went in the oven when it was cold. They remained covered until 15 minutes after the oven had reached 410F. Then the probe of a thermometer was inserted in one of the loaves and baking continued until internal temperature registered 205F. 


 


This time I didn't forget about my rye breads in the oven.  They were sliced 36 hours later.


 


Here are some pictures:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/41705172@N04/sets/72157623703922158/show/


 

Yumarama's picture
Yumarama

Anyone have experience with wood baking frames?

I ran across this blog post yesterday and it got me interested. The blogger, theinversecook, used a wooden baking frame to make his very straight sided heavy rye bread. Since I can't seem to locate a Pullman pan anywhere nearby (online they cost an arm & a leg to ship up from the states) I thought maybe this would make a decent substitute.


Bonus points for having the ability to make it any size I may darn well want.


Anyone here used one before? Any tips to it's use? Should it get lined with parchment? What sort of wood would be best to use? Since it's a rather small item, even fancier hardwood planks would be possible, while plain pine would be good too, if it doesn't give off piney flavours.


(Edited broken link to flickr pics. just hop over to the blog to see the cool baking frame)

ehanner's picture
ehanner

More Fromartz's Baguettes

Intrigued by the beautiful Baguette's that Sam Fromartz has been baking, I continue to plod along, improving my skills at baking this simple(?) bread. The original post on his blog can be found here.


I'm actually trying to see if I can taste and see an improvement in the bread when using some original French T55 flour sent to me by a very kind friend a while back. This is Organic T55 from Biocoop and reported to be very good flour. My new go to AP flour is from Dakota Maid. I like the colors I get and the flavors of the grain. After the side by side with the T55, I'm wondering about the amount of malted barley they add. The crust seems to color much more quickly. I used the same formula and method for both flours to arrive at these results. Both breads were flavorful and exhibited good qualities. Not the same but both very good.


Eric




 





T55 Baguette has a nice lighter golden color. The flavor didn't suffer in comparison to the DM flour which was much darker from the same bake time.



Crust detail on the T55. You can see the more golden color, even through the heavy handed additional flour I dusted over the dough prior to baking.



This is the Dakota Maid crumb. Very translucent and a nice crisp crust.

Pages