The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

baguettes that don't look like baguettes - until you cut them open


 


Had a little fun playing with shapes when making my weekly baguettes. The flower shape was introduced by Wally and Eric, and shaping video is here. The official version should have 6 petals, but I divided and shaped my baguette as usual, which are much shorter than full size baguettes (limited by my baking stone and oven size), went with 5 petals instead. The other shape was "dragon tail" introduced by wild yeast here.



 


They look pretty on the outside, AND within. The following is made with my 36 hour SD baguettes with rye starter (recipe here, the 3rd variation). Nice open crumb, with great flavor.



 


The next two pictures are from a batch made with my 36 hour SD baguettes with 45% whole grain (recipe here, the last variation)



 



 


The fancy shape may have made the crumb a bit less open, but not too much, pretty happy with the results.



 


Submitting to Yeastspotting.

hening's picture
hening

Honey Bread

From 《美味面包巧手做》, written by 王传仁


translated by Hening


Ingredient Original Personal


bread flour 1000g   250g


salt             15g     3-4g


milk powder 20g     5g


liquid honey200g    50g


water          580g    185g


fresh yeast  30g      3g instant yeast


unsalted butter40g  10g


 


Actually I used 210g water this time. I didn't peek at the dough while the final fermentation because a blogger who practiced this recipe twice said it would take such a long time. As a result, it was a little overproof. Fortunately, it wasn't sour.




flashfingers's picture
flashfingers

Beginner Question...Kneading by hand vs KitchenAid

I made several Italian breads yesterday. All of them began the same way.... Then, you stirred ingrediants in bowl with wooden spoon. Then you used one hand to fold over dough towards center while spinning bowl with other hand. Then came the kneading time...20 minutes or so with 1-2 minute rests along the way.


IS THERE A STANDARD CONVERSION FOR MAKING THE MIX WITH A KITCHENAID MIXER? Does it take 10 minutes? 20 minutes?


I know at some point you get an eye for it or you can touch the dough and see that its right, but I need some general recommendations here. I've made pizza doughs with the kitchenaid and really had no idea when they were done mixing. HOW DO I KNOW WHEN ITS DONE?


HELP PLEASE


THANKS!


 


 

Jo_Jo_'s picture
Jo_Jo_

BBA 2011 English Muffins

Links to my fellow baker's in the Bread Baker's Apprentice Challenge, 2011!  Here are links to their versions of this bread.  They are all very talented baker's, who have gotten together to share their results from baking the Bread's in Peter Reinhart's book Bread Baker's Apprentice.


Our host Chris at A Ku Indeed!


I will post others as they finish theirs!

Today is the day for making my first English muffins.  I know that Andy will love these, in fact he has been waiting for these since Christmas.  Really I should have done them sooner, but there have been so many recipes to try and things to do that I just hadn't gotten to it.  Another storm rolled in last night giving us a ton of rain followed by a skiff of snow overnight, which means it's pretty chilly in the house today, so it's another perfect baking day! English muffins and crumpets always remind me of a time years ago when I was a young teen.  My mom took me to a small tea house and we sat and talked while we ate English muffins toasted with crab and jack cheese melted on top.   We each had a cup of fancy tea, and it was such a good day.  I remember feeling very grown up. That is a memory I will never forget, one of those times when you know that your mom loves you and wants to be with you. She asked for the recipe for those crab and cheese topped English muffins, and would make them occasionally throughout my teen years.  I can't remember if we had crumpets that day, but they also bring memories of growing up.  They always have butter and honey on them, and simply make my mouth water and my brain transports back to my childhood.  I think I will make them next....

From BBA English Muffins
Everything in it's place, so very organized.  Now if you know me well, you will realize that the bowl is sitting on another counter with everything except the buttermilk/kefir in it.  I started to put things away, when I realized I hadn't taken a picture of it so I hastily grabbed it all together in one spot and took a "pretty" picture so you would all think "She is so organized!".  I am the one that has to rerun the recipe in my head a dozen times to make sure that I didn't leave anything out. Here are the dry ingredients all added together.  I adjusted the recipe by using 50% fresh ground Winter White Wheat rather than all bread flour, replaced the sugar with honey, and used kefir in place of buttermilk.  I normally use the baker's percentages for the BBA recipes, but this time the recipe only made 6 English muffins which I figured we would eat pretty quickly.  I weighed everything according to the book, and used measuring spoons for the honey, salt and yeast.  I went ahead and put the entire 8 oz of kefir into the flour mix, figuring if it was to wet then I would simply add a little flour.  It was looking pretty sticky at this point, so I allowed it to autolyse for half an hour.  This seems to help a lot, especially when working with whole wheat flours. What starts out very sticky, ends up quite manageable after kneading it for 6 minutes after it's 30 minute nap. Here it is, with the bowl looking all clean on the sides.  I love when dough has this consistency, just makes it so easy to work with. Time to scoop it out of the bowl and form it into a boule.  I will let it rise for 90 minutes, possibly a little longer because it's cold in the kitchen today. It looks so small in the container I use to do the first rise.  Getting used to recipes that make a large amount of dough, which I usually reduce down to 2 lb so I don't get over run! Here it is after it's first rise, ready to be gently removed from it's jar and carefully made into small boule's. It just seems like such a small amount of dough to me! Wow, only a little over a pound of dough! I have these cool English muffin rings that I got for Christmas and have been wanting to try. I sprinkled semolina into the rings after I sprayed the parchment paper with oil. The rings have shortening on them, to keep them from sticking. Dough has risen for 90 minutes, ready to fry!!!! Things were looking pretty good at this point and I decided to fry three with rings off and three with rings on. I put the muffins into the pan, and then pulled the rings off these ones. They immediately started to spread slightly in the pan. I fried them for 6 minutes, and when I turned them over they were burnt on that side! Yuck, my pan was to hot even though it was set to the temp in the book. I then turned it down 50 degrees, and hoped for the best. I fried that side for 5 minutes. Here are the three I fried with the rings on, including when I flipped them over. At that point I took the rings off, and continued frying them. The pan was a much better temp, and I fried them for 8 minutes on each side. Here they are all ready to cool off and then to eat. They look pretty good! Crumb shot....
jombay's picture
jombay

Straight Dough AB&P Croissants

Hey guys,


I prepared and shaped a double test batch of the straight dough croissant formula last night, tossed them in the fridge overnight, then proofed and baked them at my baking & pastry arts skills class this morning.


I could have proofed them a bit longer but I had to get out of there as another class was getting ready to start. These were done all by hand. I guess I'll start trying the sheeter at work or school now.


Formula;


Croissant Dough from Suas' Advanced Bread and Pastry


Ingr.                          Bakers %    Test


Bread Flour                100.00         1lb 1 5/8 oz


Water                        38.00           6 3/4 oz


Milk                           23.00           4 oz


Sugar                        13.00           2 1/4 oz


Salt                           2.00             3/8 oz


Osmo. Instant Yeast   1.20             1/4 oz


Malt                          0.50             1/8 oz   *I didn't have any so I cut it out


Butter                       4.00             3/4 oz


Roll-in Butter             25.00           8 oz      **Butter for roll-in is a percentage of the total dough weight


Added everything to my KA and mixed for about 5 mins on 2nd speed. Bulk fermented for about 3 hours at RT, then rolled in butter in 3 single folds. Shaped, retarded for about 12 hours, then proofed for maybe 3 hours. Eggwashed and baked at 400f.


-Matt



 



 


Diva's picture
Diva

Got the Call

So, I own and run a small restaurant bakery in Greenfield, Indiana.   Just got the call from another area restaurant that was featured on Diners and Dives.  They ran out of their NEW YORK imported hoagie bun.... Breaddiva to the rescue!


 


I am blowing up the recipe on the home page and giving it a go.


Lets see 400 hoagies rock out and land me a contract tomorrow!


 


Diva

sustainthebaker's picture
sustainthebaker

Freezing Dough

I need to know all about freezing doughs. I have only frozen pizza doughs and do not have experience freezing other loaves. In particular, I have a standard white bread dough recipe that I use for dinner rolls or sandwich loaves. My questions are:  what are the best ways to freeze dough? What point of the proofing stage is best to freeze dough? How long can it be frozen and still rise? Any precautions needed?


 


Ideas?


Thanks.

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Bear Claw and Fourth Time was a charm with Croissant Making

My mission to practice making croissants continues. Fourth-time was indeed a charm. I was quite happy with the result and felt that I was on the right track. There could be a number of factors contributing to better outcomes this week.





  • Different butter - I used Danish style cultured butter this week. The butter texture is different. It was much more pliable, softer and creamier, which, in my opinion, made it easier to laminate into the dough.

  • Practice make perfect - though I'm not anything near perfect, but practice does help tremendously. I started to get into the rhythm and know what I should do and don't.

  • Room temperature - the week before, room temp was sitting around 28C. This week it was a comfortable 20c range. It made all the different with laminating the dough, the butter stay solid without melting.

  • I rolled the dough more carefully and rested the laminated dough frequently during the rolling of each turn. I also rested the dough longer between each turn (1 hr this week against 20 minutes last week's).


As I like trying new recipes, I made half of the croissant dough into bear claw, a croissant pastry filled with frangipane and shape like a bear foot. The recipe comes from Bourke Street Bakery cookbook. It tastes lovely with nice almond flavour and moist interior.



I also had lots of croissant dough scrap from all the trimmings. Instead of throwing that in the bin (which I hate to do), I made them into a pesto croissant baguette. Though, the baguette wasn't as flaky as croissants (given that they were dough scrap bundled together), I was surprise that it was reasonably flaky and tasted rather nice.


 


For a more photo and recipes, you can find it here.


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com


 


 


 


 

Syd's picture
Syd

How do you stitch banneton cloth liner?

Does anyone have a pattern for cutting and stitching cloth to make a banneton liner?  I am at a complete loss how to do it.  How do I make a square piece of cloth round?  Do you need stitch some elastic into it so that it stays on the basket?  I am totally clueless, so any help will be appreciated.


Syd

varda's picture
varda

Tuscan Bread

Recently my husband announced that he needed to cut way back on salt in his diet, and after quizzing me about the bread I've been baking, determined that he needed to cut way back on my bread.   Given that he's my principal guinea pig (I mean recipient, I mean,... oh forget it)  I viewed this as a setback.   After some thought though I realized it was an opportunity.   And so ...  Tuscan bread.



I used the recipe from King Arthur http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/tuscan-bread-pane-toscano-recipe with a few tweaks.  There is no salt in this whatsoever.   I was expecting it to taste drab and dull, and to sag and look awful.   But no - just a nice simple white bread, and tasty too, with a distinctive taste, that I wouldn't necessarily have attributed to lack of salt without knowing that was the "missing" ingredient.   The crumb is nothing to write home about:



but the crust is very crisp and nice (I don't recall ever making anything like it before) and I even got a visit from the crackle fairy who has been boycotting me no matter what I do:


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