The Fresh Loaf

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isand66's picture
isand66

100% Durum Semolina 36 hour Method

I love baking with Durum flour and bake with it all the time, so I figured it was time to finally make a 100% Durum bread.  I have not used the 36 hour method in a while so I incorporated it into this bake and used some KAF Durum flour in the 2 stage starter and in the final dough.  Technically there is a little bit of AP flour in the seed starter but I hope you won't hold that against me.

The technique I used for this bake creates a pretty sticky dough so it's not for the faint of heart but if you are willing to take the plunge you will be rewarded with an open and moist crumb and crispy crust.

I decided to make one large miche and used one of my Good Will finds for the banneton which left a nice pattern on the bread.

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100%DurumSemolinaSD

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Directions

Semolina Starter Build 1

Mix ingredients in a bowl until thoroughly combined.  Cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature for around 8 hours.  The starter should almost double when ready to proceed.

Semolina Starter Build 2

Add to Build 1 Starter:

100 grams Durum Flour

100 grams Water at Room Temperature (80-90 degrees F.)

Mix ingredients in a bowl until thoroughly combined.  Cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature for around  4 - 6 hours.  The starter should almost double when ready to proceed.

Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flour and the ice water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Put the dough in a slightly covered oiled bowl and put in the refrigerator for 12 hours.

The next day add your starter and salt to the dough and mix by hand until it is thoroughly mixed and evenly distributed.  Due to the high water content in the 100% hydration starter this dough is very easy to mix by hand and is very silky and smooth.

Bulk rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours until it grows around 1/3 in volume doing stretch and folds every half hour until it has developed the correct amount of strength.

Put the dough back into the refrigerator for around 20-24 hours.  I took it out about 20 hours later.

When you take the dough out of the refrigerator you want it to have almost doubled in volume.  Mine only rose about 1/3 in volume.  Let it rise at room temperature for around 2 hours or until the dough has doubled from the night before.

Next, divide the dough and shape as desired and place them in their respective basket(s).

Cover the dough with a moist towel and let sit at room temperature for 1.5 to 2 hours.

Score the loaves as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.

Scored

Set your oven for 525 degrees F. at least 45 minutes before ready to bake.  When ready to bake place the loaves into your oven on your oven-stone with steam and let it bake for 10 minutes and then lower the temperature  to 450 degrees.    When the loaf is golden brown and reached an internal temperature of 210 degrees F. you can remove it from the oven.

Let the bread cool down for at least an 3 hours or so before eating as desired.

Crumb

MaxBird
Max getting in the Thanksgiving spirit with his Bird Hat
 
Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Brotform vs Linen Basket - Scoring/Bloom

Does anyone have any comments or experience with this?

Last weekend I baked two loaves...one proofed in a bamboo brotform and the other in a linen lined basket.  Both were from the same formula.  Both retarded in fridge over night.

The loaf that proofed in the brotform had a perfect ear and bloom.  The scoring even felt right when slashing.

The loaf that proofed in the linen lined basket produced a flat scoring.  The scoring did not lift almost at all but just made a flat slit.  See below photos.

Does proofing in a brotform provide extra breathing for the dough during the proofing stage that develops a bit of a skin to the dough?  I have seen many loaves that were proofed in a linen lined basket that produced great ears and bloom.

Also, if this happened to me once or twice, I would not worry about it, but this is now the 3rd or 4th time that I have noticed this happen to my linen lined loaves.  Also, have noticed it happen more with higher hydration doughs.  Also, if lined with seeds in a linen basket, it does not happen.  Perhaps the seeds give the extra breathing to the dough?

Any advice?

John

 

Loaf proofed in brotform

 

Loaf proofed in linen basket in top right in background

 

Another a few months ago proofed in linen lined basket.  This this one had other issues as well, but same outcome with flat slash and no bloom.

duckybud's picture
duckybud

Pizza "Stone"

Has anyone tried 1/2 in stainless for a "stone"?  I am having problems with stones breaking if liquid coming from pizza comes in contact with stone and cracking them.  Thought about steel or maybe even stainless steel.  Think it would have to be at least 1/2 in to keep from warping when using highest setting of home oven.

Any feedback would help.

Bud

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Almost Twin White Breads - One YW / SD and One SD

It has been a long time since we have done any YW baking and it was time to refresh the YW after 4 weeks hiding in the fridge.  We decided at the last minute to do a test comparison bake. One with a YW/SD levain and one with just a SD levain.

 

The YW / SD version had 4% more whole grains.  We wanted to weigh it down a little more than the SD version and we added a multi-grain scald to both since we love whole berry scalds in breads almost as much as w love sprouts.  The YW version was 22% while grain and the SD version was 18%.

 

Both are a little light on the whole grain side but we also need some croutons for Thanksgiving stuffing too and these loaves should fit the bill well.  The levains were built over 3 stages and then refrigerated for 24 hours after they had risen 255 after the 3rd stage feeding.

 

Since these were white breads we did a 1 hour autolyse this time.  We did up the hydration a couple of points on the YW version to account for more while grains.  We did follow our usual method of 3 sets of slap and folds (7, 3 and 1minute) and 2 sets of stretch and folds all 15 minutes apart. As soon as the folding was comp, ete the dough was pre-shaped and then shaped into a boule and an oval for the SD/YW version.

 

Some of this year's lettuce crop in pots

We put the dough seam side down in the baskets hoping to get a natural cracking at the seams when the dough hit the heat and steam the next day ala Ski’s Forkish and David Snyder’s Pugliesi.  The dough was then retarded in the fridge for 16 hours - 4 hours more than we would have liked but that is life.

 

The dough nearly proofed 100% in the fridge because of the extra 4 hours.  No worries since we had planned to bake it cold right out of the fridge and not to slash it so the stiff cold dough wouldn’t collapse due to any over-proofing.

 

The dough was un-molded and placed into Big Old Betsy 20 minutes after the oven hit 525 F and the oven had further climbed to 550 F.  It was sandwiched between 2 stones and the mega steam was supplied with two Pyrex pans filled with lava rocks and half full of water that were placed in the oven when it hit 525 F

 

The bread steamed for 5 minutes at 550 F, 5 minutes at 500 F and 5 minutes at 475 F. After 15 minutes the steam was removed from the oven as it was turned down to 425 F, convection this time.  We rotated the bread 180 degrees every 5 minutes until the bread registered 205 F on the inside - exactly 15 minutes after the steam came out and 30 minutes total baking time.

 

The bread browned beautifully with huge blisters on the outside of both but more so on the YW / SD oval.  The bread did spring but it was contained within the crust which didn’t crack because it was 100% proofed.  So these are totally unblemished crusts but still very attractive!  The YW/SD appears to have puffed itself up a little more than the SD  boule.

 

The crumb of the YW / SD was open, soft and moist with a SD tang that was somewhat muted but not missing either.  It is a delicious bread.  We didn't cut into the SD version and froze it whole for Thanksgiving.  This bread made for a nice cotto salami and aged cheddar cheese sandwich for today's lunch. This bread reminds me of Tartine only it has more chew due to the scald.

 

YW / SD Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

2.59%

Yeast Water

30

0

0

30

5.18%

Whole Rye

5

10

9

24

4.14%

Whole Wheat

5

10

9

24

4.14%

Whole Spelt

5

10

9

24

4.14%

Water

0

15

17

32

5.52%

Total

60

45

44

149

20.53%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multi-grain Flour

80

13.72%

 

 

 

Water

70

11.99%

 

 

 

Hydration

87.42%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

14.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

White Whole Wheat

100

0.17256

 

 

 

AP

400

69.03%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

500

86.28%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.90%

 

 

 

Soaker Water

375

64.71%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

75.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

580

100.00%

 

 

 

Soaker Water

445

76.70%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

76.70%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

22.35%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,110

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Whole Rye

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Total Scald

75

12.94%

 

 

 

 

SD Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

2.58%

Whole Rye

9

6

10

25

4.29%

Whole Wheat

9

6

10

25

4.29%

Whole Spelt

9

6

10

25

4.29%

Water

30

18

10

58

9.96%

Total

72

36

40

148

25.41%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multi-grain Flour

83

14.16%

 

 

 

Water

66

11.24%

 

 

 

Hydration

79.39%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

13.54%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

450

77.25%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

500

85.84%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.72%

 

 

 

Soaker Water

360

61.80%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

72.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

583

100.00%

 

 

 

Soaker Water

426

73.05%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

73.05%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

18.45%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,093

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Whole Rye

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Total Scald

75

12.94%

 

 

 

 

Lucy got her shots today so she wanted her ears rubbed!

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Boule 11 15 totally organic bloom

This loaf was proofed seam side doen again, Forkish style and baked seam side up. Though I took great pains to seal the seams in both the pre and shape, it looked like they would bloom open and they bloomed open beautifully!

I once again used 25 grams of sweet levain and 25 grams of yeast water levain, 300 grams flour and 231 grams water total. I used 30 grams durham semolina for flavour and colour boost.

I had an old friend over for dinner last night I hadn't seen in two years - before I started baking bread. He gave this loaf the best endorsement a baker can get! He ate most of it, repeatedly going to the cutting board and slicing off large chunks he wolfed down with his chili. There is barely enough left for toast this morning.

Now that I bake in a cast iron covered DO, my pizza stone gets little use, so I thought, why not place it on a rack above the DO to provide some radiant heat from the top to go with the radiant for the cast iron and the hot air convection bake. Baked 12 minutes covered, 10 minutes uncovered, turning often. Bake setup:

Time to get busy again.

Happy baking!  Brian

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

We 3 gmas made donuts!

We all started with the idea of making pumpkin "raised" donuts but adapted for equipment etc.. Mine are the lead in donuts... made way too many!!!! 

Helen made beautiful donuts... twice, at least, because they were a huge success at her daughter's workplace. She made them the first time with a simple glaze and the second time with the same glaze she used on the "Starbucks" scones... 

 and now the Special Ones.

                                                            

                                                       

Those are amazingly good looking donuts... I should have driven up there and blocked the road to her daughter's!!!!

Now we visit Barb's kitchen... these looks great! 

and so do these... the wholes and twists...  

and then fried...  and then all sugared up.  She also had a nice pot of Pea Soup going on in that kitchen.... YUMMMY.... What a great   

Fall menu... Later she made another batch of donuts, a fruitcake, and some muffins... This time she made mini donuts out of the holes... great idea. She is perfecting a "spudnut" recipe and will be getting that to us soon... I am looking forward to trying that!

We had a great time together, going on and on about donuts and enjoying ourselves... Barbra gets to pick the next bake... what is it going to be big sister?

Thanks for checking in to see what we are up to.

Happy Holiday Baking, Barbra, Diane and Helen.

Theresse's picture
Theresse

What's the least and most amount of time required for a sponge (or starter)?

Hi -

New to this of course.  A youtube video by Dave of Dave's Killer Bread showed that he let his sponge or starter (can't remember which he called it and don't know if there's a difference) sit on his counter for about an hour before continuing to add flour and mix more/knead.

Some googling (haven't yet read my bread books!) showed lots of comments about people letting their starters sit for several hours.

Last week I made Dave's recipe and let it sit for only an hour and it came out fine.  Tonight I'm doing a different version (an imitation recipe I found online of his more seedy breads which he doesn't share recipe-wise) and I'm making 4 loaves instead of 2.  Any reason I should let it sit for longer than an hour before continuing to mix and adding the rest of the flour, etc?

Thanks!!

mkress's picture
mkress

White Breads: Var 1 The Bread Baker's Apprentice - Too Yeasty

I made White Breads: Variation 1 from The Bread Baker's Apprentice and I made knot rolls and they turned out very yeasty.  I put in .22 ounce (1%) of Fleshman's IDY as was called for.  I tried to follow the recipe as exact as I could and everything seemed to go well.  Should i halve the yeast and go for a longer rise in the future?  Is there something else that can contribute to it tasting too yeasty?

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Three pizzas

The first was with chanterelle mushrooms on a white sauce.  My wife's all time favourite.

The second BBQ chicken with red onion and cilantro. The kids got to it before I got my camera out.

The third chicken, red onion, and pesto.

All came out well.  I was playing with Reinhart's American style pizza dough.  It is good too and makes a thicker, stiffer slice than his neo-Neapolitan dough does, one that is easier to pick up with your fingers rather than eat with a fork and knife.  It is a good option to consider for a setting where you want people to be able to grab a slice and wander off. 

isand66's picture
isand66

Multi-grain Sourdough with Soaker

Today it's snowing.  Not enough to bring out the snow-blower but enough to enjoy a nice cup of soup with a sandwich made with my hearty multi-grain bread.  I've made similar breads before and I followed the basic procedure but I varied the soaker/scald ingredients and the combination of flours in the main dough.

I used some Vermont maple syrup infused with vanilla to add a touch of sweetness to offset some of the bitterness from all the whole grains used in the recipe.

I cooked the whole grains with 290 grams of water on my stove top and let it come to a boil for about 5 minutes.  I then transferred the scald to a bowl and let it sit overnight covered.  The scald absorbed all of the water so I adjusted my final water amount accordingly.  I still ended up with a very moist dough but one that was manageable.

I really like the way the crust and crumb came out on this bake.  A nice dark thick crust with a chewy interior, perfect for the cold days and nights ahead.

I have to say I've bought multi-grain breads from the supermarket in the past and there is just no comparison to this healthy and tasty bread.

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Multigrain-SD-withSoaker-1

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Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours with the water and honey in your mixer or by hand for 1 minute leaving 50 grams of water to add later.   Let the dough autolyse for 20 minutes to an hour in your bowl and make sure to cover it.  Next add in the salt, olive oil and the soaker and mix for 2 minutes.  Add the balance of the water as needed and mix for an additional 4 minutes.  The dough should have come together in a ball and be tacky but not too sticky.

Next take the dough out of the bowl and place it on your work surface or a clean dough rising bucket sprayed with cooking spray.  Do a stretch and fold and rest the dough uncovered for 10 minutes.  After the rest do another stretch and fold and cover the dough and let it rest for 10 minutes.  Do one more stretch and fold and put the dough into a lightly oiled bowl and let it sit at room temperature covered for 2 hours.  After 2 hours you can put the dough into the refrigerator for 24 hours or up to 2 days before baking.  Feel free to do some additional S & F's if you feel it is necessary.  I baked the bread about 24 hours later.

The next day (or when ready to bake) let the dough sit out at room temperature for 1.5 - 2  hours.

basket

Next, form the dough into your desired shape and put them in floured bannetons, bowls or on a baking sheet and let them rise covered for 2 hours or until they pass the poke test.  Score the loaves as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.  I made one large miche for this bake.  I also added some organic oat bran to the bottom of the basket which adds a nice texture to the outside of the bread.

Scored

Set your oven for 525 degrees F. at least 30 minutes before ready to bake.  When ready to bake place the loaves into your on  your oven stone with steam and let it bake for about 5 minutes.  Next lower the temperature to 500 degrees for about 2 minutes and then lower to 450 degrees.   Since I baked this as a miche I then lowered the temperature to 425 degrees about half way through the bake until it was finished.  When you have a nice dark crust and the internal temperature reaches at least 210 degrees you can take it out of the oven and place it on a cooling rack.

Let the loaves cool down for at least an 6 hours or so before eating as desired.

Crumb

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