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midwest baker's picture
midwest baker

Mediterranean Rolls

http://www.evatoneva.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=234:mediterraneanbreads&catid=6:pitki&Itemid=8


This recipe for Mediterrainean Rolls looks really good. I haven't made them yet but I finally have what I think is a good translation to English.The original recipe is at the above link. The amount of yeast looks high so I'd cut that down. The salt looks low but parmesan is salty so it's probably okay. Thought you might want to have the translation.


 



Mediterrainean Rolls


400-450 g flour
300 g  water
100 g Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
7 g instant yeast
2 tsp honey
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp rosemary
50 g olive oil (about 4 T)

Dissolve yeast and honey in 150 ml of warm water, cover and leave in a warm place to rise for 10-15 minutes.
In a bowl sift flour and salt, add the finely grated cheese, stir.
Make a well and pour the yeast and remaining water, Knead to a soft dough.
Shape it into balls and place in a greased bowl, cover it with cloth and leave in a warm place to rise until doubled in volume.
Pour the risen dough on work surface, cut it to 8 equal parts.
Shape rolls, place them in greased or parchment paper covered baking tray.
Allow rolls to rise for 20-30 minutes.
Brush them with olive oil, sprinkle with rosemary.
Bake them 20-30 minutes in preheated oven to 350 degrees F.


Mary


www.midwestbaker.blogspot.com

Yuval35's picture
Yuval35

Brioche Question

Hello,


recentlly i am trying to improve my brioche skils.


I made 2 classic brioche receips but unfortuantlly the dough wasn`t rise enough.


finally i found another receipe from KAF which was very good in a matter of texture but the flavors was poor( in my opinion).


anyway i was searching the web for other brioche receips and found several differences and methods.


1. some of them are not using any liquid instead of butter and eggs and some of them using around 1\4 to 1\2 water\milk\orange juice.


    the receips whice i faild with them was without water. the KAF was with water which was easier to handle.


2. another issue is the butter temparature. some of them insist to use cold butter and some of them using  soft butter.


can anyone put some light about those methods ?

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Semolina Bread

The family were coming to supper and as a change from my usual sourdough loaf to go with the hearty soup I decided to make Semolina Bread. Pane di Semola on another page of my notebook, guess I really liked the sound of this recipe to copy it twice. After the dough has doubled the instructions say to punch it down (!) and "chafe" for 5 minutes. I searched high and low and could not find a single reference to chafing, so I folded the dough over a couple of times and let it rest before dividing. I am sure some kind TFL member will be able to tell me how to chafe? By the way, the bread got rave reviews for the lovely soft crust and yellow crumb, but my grandgirls pointed out the space for the lazy baker! A.


La masa's picture
La masa

One handed slap & fold

This all started as a joke in the Spanish forum http://www.elforodelpan.com


I commented on my way of kneading, which is basically the slap & fold method using just one hand. It's a very convenient method for the amount of dough I use to make, about 1.2 Kg or 2.65 lb, but I've used it with up to 2.5 Kg of dough.


Good-humoured discussiong followed, with some forum members ironically questioning the possibility of such a thing as one-hand slap & fold, so I decided to make a little video and this is the result.


 


breadsong's picture
breadsong

Baguettes - 2nd try

Hello, I tried Mr. Hamelman's Baguettes with Poolish (half-recipe) again today. A big thank you to khalid who gave me some very useful comments after my first baguette post, which were a great help this time around. This time the baguettes were easier to score.
I am still hoping for more holes:
 
Ciril Hitz has a baguette shaping video ( http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/18968/baguette-shaping-ciril-hitz ) (thanks to dmsnyder for posting this!); in this video Mr. Hitz demonstrates, by stretching the dough, what development should be before shaping (my dough wasn't quite that developed)...will try for better gluten development next time & see if this improves the crumb...   
Regards, breadsong

busy lizzy's picture
busy lizzy

Gluten Free Bread recipes

Hello,  I have recently been told that I can only eat Gluten free or yeast free breads.  I'm at a loss what does this mean and where can I find these recipes.  I have been baking for over 50 years and this is a first for me. I would appreciatae any help I can get.  Thanks Busy Lizy

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Seeds and apples, part II

Autumn is truly here, and every tree is decked out in breathtaking yellow and red colours. This is one of my favourite parts of the year, where afternoons are best spent strolling among the autumn leaves on silent sidewalks and catching every last bit of warmth the sun can muster.


The colder times of the year are also the best to bake in, and this week I've tried my hands at one of my absolute favourite lighter rye breads, Hamelman's flax seed rye from Modern Baking. The formula is very similar to many of his rye sourdough breads from "Bread", but I feel the Modern Baking flax seed rye is even better balanced in terms of overall hydration and amount of soaker. The addition of stale bread to the cold soaker gives this bread a unique, robust rye flavour.


This week, I've enjoyed two flax seed rye loaves based on a formula that is a slight adaption of Hamelman's original. Here's a link to my slightly modified formula. Below is a shot of the loaf at the end of final proof, seconds before I'm sliding it into the hot oven:


Flax seed rye bread


And here it is, fresh out of the oven:


Flax seed rye bread


Here's a shot of the second loaf, which was gently rolled in oat bran before it was proofed in a floured banneton:


Flax seed rye bread


Here's a shot of the crumb, from a little later in the day:


Flax seed rye bread crumb


The crumb doesn't get very open due to the flax seeds, but it's very moist and stays fresh for days. Once you've almost finished it, save some slices to put in your next batch :)


 


I've also continued my apple tart studies with some pleasantly autumn-tasting Calvados apple custard tarts:


Apple Tart Parisienne


 


...and the tart "crumb" below. Local apples are stunningly good this time of year, and a tart like this is perfect for a lazy Sunday afternoon. A thin layer of lingonberry jam provides a nice tang to the otherwise vanilla and Calvados infused apples:


Apple Tart Parisienne


 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Pumpkin breads for Canadian Thanksgiving

Hello and Happy Thanksgiving to those celebrating this weekend!
I tried shaping breads as Pumpkins for the occasion.


I tried this recipe first:
http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2007/10/16/world-bread-food-day/
substituting 75% stone-ground whole wheat and 25% bread flour for the high extraction flour,
substituting canned pumpkin for the sweet potato,
substituting flax seed for pumpkin seed


When mixing I found it really hard to get the dough to develop & also didn't give it enough time to proof; there was very little oven spring.
I'm positive the wildyeastblog.com formula is wonderful given the lovely result pictured with the formula on the wildyeastblog site...I certainly didn't do this recipe justice.
My flour substitution might not have been ideal either, but welcome any thoughts anyone might have on this!

These little pumpkins are like bricks as a result of my efforts, so I stacked them like bricks for the photo!
Crust was tasty, crumb very moist, and a subtle pumpkin flavor.




Not feeling good about the first dough was shaping up for me, I started a second...Rose Levy Beranbaum's French Country Sourdough, with pumpkin puree swapped in for some of the water in the recipe. In The Bread Bible, Rose writes canned pumpkin puree is 90% water; using this as a guide, I used 200g of pumpkin puree for a triple recipe of this bread and then topped off with some additional water. These came out lighter with more oven spring - and will be shared with family tomorrow!



To shape these breads, I shaped boules and slashed starting at the bottom and up to the top, almost to center, trying to make "pumpkin lines". I took a small round cookie cutter, floured it, then twisted and gently pushed down, twisting back and forth, until I'd cleanly cut a "stem".
This idea I got from hanseata (Tyrolean Pumpkin Seed Mini Breads - thanks hanseata!)


Hope the second batch tastes OK tomorrow. Happy Thanksgiving from breadsong

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Lionel Vatinet on Dough Mixing

For those who are unable to attend a professionally-taught bread baking class, the next best thing, an excellent discussion of the three major dough mixing techniques by Lionel Vatinet, can be found here (you may have to sign on to the Modern Baking website, but signing on is free and the article is well worth it).


 


SteveB


www.breadcetera.com

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Borodinsky - when it's baked in a cake tin


This is a 100% sourdough rye from the book "Bread Matter". that book is an excellent read but for some reason, this is the first recipe I made from it. Well, second actually, but that Russian Rye was a total disaster. I think there's a printing error in the formula, it just has too much water. Yes, I know pure rye breads should have very wet dough, clay like in fact, but that one was in the porridge territory. Anyhow, back to this Borodinsky - opposite of that Russian Rye, it's perfect. The formula is right on for everything. My husband is still just getting used to the taste of heavy rye, even he immediately liked it.


 


I did make one major change -- I know, I know, I seem to be incapable of sticking to instructions, but this time it's not my fault! Sort of. After I mixed the clay like dough, I discovered that I don't have a loaf tin that's the right size for this amount of dough. I don't want something that's too big since I want the bread to have some height, in a pinch, I used an oval Japanse cheese cake tin I got from China, it's pefect! about 60% full going in:



Almot to the top at the end of fermentation



And a little domed over after it's done:



- levain


rye starter (100%), 20g


rye, 90g


water, 190g


 


1. Mix and leave at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours. Mine was left for 20hours, very bubbly and sour.


 


- main dough


levain, 270g


rye, 230g


salg, 5g


coarsely grounded coriander seeds, 5g, plus more for topping


molasses, 20g


barley malt syrup, 15g


water, 90g


 


2. Mix everything, and dump into an oiled tin, smooth the top if necessary but try not to press it down, otherwise the dough mighth get into crease and make it hard to demold.


3. Rise for 2 to 5 hours, if the dough is a little over half of the tin going in, at the end of the rise, it should be just below the top. Mine was left at 23C for 2.5 hours, my rye starter is lightening fast.


4. Brush water on top and spread a layer of coarsely grounded coriander seeds


5. Bake at 430F for 10min, then 400F for 40min. Maybe my cake tin doesn't conduct heat well, but at that point I took it out and the bread is not nearly done. I put it back and baked at 400F for another 20min, perfect. Wrapped for 36 hours before cutting in.



 


Nice even crumb, still a bit bottom heavy but getting there. I think I prefer a "not so warm" rise for my sourdough rye, as supposed to the "very warm temp" what most books suggests. It's moist but not sticky, very flavorful. I decide that I really like coriander in my breads.



 


I was complaining about not being able to find rye flour in local grocery stores, Eric pointed me to fresh ground Rye from Country Creations (flourgirl51), I got two huge bags, and that''s what I use in my rye breads these days. Very flavorful and great price/service.



Completely unrelated, here's a Chocolate-Almond torte I whipped up to use up some egg whites, very good.



 


The recipe is from "Pure Dessert", but can be found here. The recipe asked for a 9inch pan, I used an 8 inch, worked out wel.



 


Easy to make and VERY VERY VERY delicious, especially if you like dark chocolate. Perfect with a little whipped cream.



Sending to Yeastspotting.

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