The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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bencheng's picture
bencheng

Blisters on bagels

I've been making bages using form Ciril Hitz's book formula. After I shaped the bagels I kept them in the refriggerator for about 15 - 20 hours depends on the day.


For some reason all the bagels have tiny blisters on the crust. I've done some research and people said that's because of extended fermentation, but I think the texture and density were about right and I don't believe they were kept in the fridge for too long.


Some said that this is common for hand rolled bagels, but if you have any ideas that I can make smooth crust bagels I'd love to know.


Thanks


Ben


 


Bagel1


blisters

jackie9999's picture
jackie9999

My first Focaccia

I've never made a Focaccia before so thought I'd try the one in BBA. Instead of the poolish I used my starter which I left overnight. I also 1/2'd the recipe...


It tastes very good - and looks pretty - but I'm not sure if it's too 'bready' looking - is it supposed to have big 'ciabatta' like holes?



Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Starter with a Rotten Egg aroma

I have been experimenting with keeping my kamut/wheat and rye starters out on my counter rather than storing them in the refrig. for the past week.


My rye starter has a very pleasant aroma but my kamut/wheat has a bit of a rotten egg aroma to it that puzzles me.  (My starters in my refrigerator usually give off an alcoholic aroma after being stored for awhile so this is a new fragrance to me....)


I have been taking 5g of starter and giving it 5.5 grams of water and 8.5 grams of flour for a hydration level of 63%.  It is stored on my kitchen counter where the temp. varies according to the time of day.  It can fluctuate a good 10° in any given 24 hour period.  


I have been feeding it every 12 hours unless the temps have been a lot cooler then I have let it go 18 hours.  ( I judge feeding time by how it looks. I roll it up into a firm ball after it is first mixed and once it has relaxed and softened I feed it.)


These are both mature starters and I have been using them for several months now.


If this is a 'bad' thing, I do have back up starter in my refrig. and can use it but I wanted to check here first before starting a new counter batch...


THanks for any suggestions.


 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Bara Brith

Hello,
Awhile ago I'd found elra's post on wildyeastblog.com about Bara Brith - I've been wanting to try making this lovely-sounding fruit-and-spice Welsh 'speckled' bread ever since.
I've got Elizabeth David's English Bread and Yeast Cookery on loan from the libary; there's a recipe for Bara Brith in her book too.
This is my variation of Bara Brith, based on elra's and Elizabeth's. 
I was delighted with the light, cakey, tender and flavorful! result:


Both loaves, and a crumb shot (top slice separated upon slicing...couldn't wait until it was completely cool to slice and taste!):
 


 

Ingredients (for 2 x 450g loaves)

Weight in grams

Baker's %

 

 

 

Bread flour

335

83%

Red Fife 75% whole wheat flour

67

17%

Milk

202

50.2%

Eggs, whole (= 1 large egg)

53

13.2%

Yeast instant, osmotolerant

9

2.2%

Sugar, demerara

58

14.4%

Salt

6

1.5%

Unsalted butter, 70F

64

15.9%

Currants

26

6.5%

Raisins, dark

26

6.5%

Raisins, golden

26

6.5%

Orange peel, candied, diced

26

6.5%

Sweet spice blend

2

0.5%

 

 

 

Total

900

224%


 

(1) Soak currants and raisins overnight in strong, cold tea.

(2) The next day, bring milk, egg, and butter to room temperature. Drain the currants and raisins. Add diced candied orange peel to currants and raisins.

(3) Mix together sweet spices to your liking, to equal 2 grams. I used .7 g freshly grated nutmeg, .7 g allspice, and .2 g each of cinnamon, cloves and ginger.

(4) Whisk milk, egg and salt together to combine, in bowl.

(5) Blend flours, yeast and sugar in a larger, mixing bowl.

(6) Add milk and egg mixture to flour mixture and stir to combine. I used a dough whisk to combine the ingredients.

(7) Kneaded on the counter until the dough windowpaned (improved mix).

(8) Kneaded in the spices, and then the butter in five additions, ensuring each addition of butter was kneaded in before adding the next. I tried to make sure the butter stayed inside the dough, so I wasn't touching/melting the butter with my hands while kneading. The dough became sticky as I was kneading in the butter. I dusted the counter lightly once or twice with flour and used a dough scraper to pick the dough up off the counter, as needed.

(9) Gradually knead in the fruit mixture until fruit is incorporated. I tried to keep the fruit within the dough and not have any pieces sticking out.

(10) Bulk ferment at 80F for two hours, with S&F at one hour.

(11) Shape, preheat oven & stone to 425F, proof for about 45 minutes to one hour at room temperature (70F).

(12) Score, bake with steam, 400 for 10 minutes, 375 for remainder of bake (30 minutes total). After 20 minutes of baking, I rotated the loaves and covered with foil to prevent overbrowning.  Let cool on rack before slicing.


I'm very happy to have discovered this bread!
Happy baking everyone,
from breadsong
intelplatoon's picture
intelplatoon

Fridge too cold??

at what temperature will yeast stop working. Ive made a few different batches of dough (brioche, and a sourdough) that i let proof at room temp for about one hour. I then put them in the fridge overnight to finish proofing slowly. when i wake up in the morning and take a look at the dough, which has been in the fridge for almost 9 hours, it doesnt look like it has done much rising at all. Is my fridge too cold? or is the retard method used to ferment only for flavor and not much rise at all. then let it rise at room temp after the fridge? i hope this makes sense. basically the fridge seems to stop my dough completely and i dont think my fridge is much colder than any other? 

Paulthemasturbaker's picture
Paulthemasturbaker

Scottish Morning Rolls:One Man`s Mission

Hello to all you bread bakers!  This is my blog detailing my adventures in trying to perfect one kind of bread, namely Scottish Morning Rolls.  My attempts have all been unsuccessful to this date and my maiden voyages began over six years ago.  I am terribly embarrassed by this but it has taken on a whole new significance due to the long buildup to even get to where I am now :-)  I shall keep adding to this blog as long as it takes to get it right so it may take some time LOL but am sure with the advice of the good people on this forum I will make some progress, which is what counts, right?  So in a nutshell, this is where we are with it...


 


The first test bake.(the first officially documented one anyway ha)


I have followed the recipe I found on TFL and shall update with the bakers` percentages which is how the recipe is written.  These rolls are in their final proofing stage which is meant to last 12-18hrs.


 


 

emmsf's picture
emmsf

Pain de Mie Formulas

I was recently given two pain de mie pans, one 9.5 inches and the other an enormous 16 inch version.  But I'm having a hard time finding good formulas for them.  I have one pumpernickel formula, and a pretty decent white.  And I was able to adjust the quantity of ingredients so they both work in either size pan.  I'm eager to try new ones, but they're surprisingly difficult to find.  Does anyone have a few good formulas they'd be willing to share?  Or, better yet, does anyone know a technique for converting standard formulas to pain de mie formulas?  I've tried a few times to convert, but it's incredibly hard to get the quantity accurate so it fills the pan just right.  Suggestions?

louie brown's picture
louie brown

Nancy Silverton's Hamburger Buns...

...minus the yeast, with a hand chopped 100% skirt steak burger and her friend onion rings.


This is essentially a savory brioche dough. I didn't see the need for the yeast. There's a 24 hour preferment (I did most of it in the fridge,) another one for the dough, which is very highly developed by mixer. The long fermentations contribute a lot of flavor that would be missing due to the intensive mix, which is the thing that strengthens the dough and gives it its beautiful even crumb.


This is a great bun or roll for a special filling of commensurate richness. The skirt steak filled that bill. If I wanted a bun for pulled pork or brisket, it would be a different one.


Sourdough makes a fantastic batter for frying. Add club soda, salt, that's it. The results are super crisp. I'm planning to use this batter again in a couple of days for whole clams.





Dwayne's picture
Dwayne

Bread Baker's Apprentice (BBA) Recipe Recommendations

I've owned this book for a while now, thanks to my daughter, and I've baked maybe a quater of the recipies.  I have a list that I keep of breads that I want to bake from it.  After seeing GSnyde's post on "Vienna Bread with Dutch Crunch" that bread has now gone to #1 on my list.  Thanks GSnyder.


 


That got me thinking what are the favorite breads from this book for other people?  There are a lot of breads that I am not familiar with.


 


So please let me know what your top 3 to 5 favorite breads are from this book.  When the answers stop rolling in I'll summarize.


 


Here are mine:


1. Focaccia - this is really a fantastic bread!


2. Ciabatta


3. Bagels


 


Thanks, Dwayne

yaunae1432's picture
yaunae1432

Sourdough

Ok, so I just made my first ever sourdough bread.  My pet (starter) took over a week to ferment since it's cool up here.  Surprisingly, my starter was perfect (thanks to some advice from my grandpa).  I let it sit in the fridge for about a week and, once we ran out of our other breads (I have a sister who bakes bread also), I decided it was time to bust out the starter and test my skills.  I followed some recipe on the Internet...probably not that smart but it seemed pretty legit and it was made in a really old-fashioned way.  I know alot about the chemistry of baking, the gluten and yeast, the ethanol and carbon dioxide..so I was really careful making this.  I let it rise about 12 hours, turned it out, and let it rise another 5.  The baking was a different story. I wasn't sure about the temperature because the recipe I followed called for an iron-cast dutch pan and I don't have one of those and I can't buy one (college) so I kind of browsed around. I baked it at 325 for about 30 minutes and when it was still really doughy I upped it to 425 (the original temp it called for) and it took about an hour to cook. It's still kind of doughy in the middle but it's nice and crunchy! I wish I cuold use steam in my oven but it breaks a seal on the outside and just lets the steam out. Better luck next time? 

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