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joshuacronemeyer's picture
joshuacronemeyer

Dough Hydration Calculator

sourdough calculator


I made a simple Hydration Calculator.  http://joshuacronemeyer.github.com/Flour-and-Water/  I've tried to use a few other online hydration calculators and there are so many textboxes that I don't know what to do with them all!  This one has NO text fields.  Instead, each colored box represents one or more variables: flour, water, starter.  Just drag the box bigger or smaller to change the quantity and everything is calculated on the fly.  I love to make sourdough and I'm always playing with my recipes, or finding myself with too little or much of one ingredient or another.  I think this calculator makes it easy to play with a recipe and tailor it to your own needs.  I'm no professional baker so it might not seem suitable for the pros, but I've checked it against a handful of my favorite recipes and found it gives accurate results.  It is open source as well so if you are inclined to dabble in that sort of thing you can click the 'fork me on github' banner to get your own copy of the source code.

diverpro94's picture
diverpro94

French Date and Almond Tart

I love making tarts! It's my new obsession! I've tried a couple recipes, but this French Date and Almond Tart is my absolute favorite... Well after some recipe testing and revisions. In fact, I love it so much that I'm officially naming it my signature pastry.


 


The first time I made it was for a get well dinner for a friend. She just had major surgery and was under some pretty hefty prescription drugs when I delivered her a lasagna, a fresh loaf of pain de champagne, and a tart. She opened the box with the tart and replied, "Oh! Isn't this what they serve to the queen?" I quickly nodded my head and walked her to her chair. Too funny.


 


French Date and Almond


 


-Colby


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Website

Maggie Lou's picture
Maggie Lou

Combining rising agents

I recently purchased Inn On the Creek ORGANIC SIX GRAIN PANCAKE MIX which has baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, and creme of tarter in the mix.  This may be an odd or even ridiculous question, but what would happen if I put a cup of this in, say a white bread recipe using yeast?


Anyone ever try this?

mdrdds's picture
mdrdds

Matzah reciepe

Passover is coming in about three weeks. I will have to put my bread baking on hold for a week. However if anyone has a recipe for matzah it would be appreciated.
Mike Robinson

Dough-No's picture
Dough-No

New Oven Recommendations

hey guys!

We will be moving into a new house very soon and will be purchasing a new oven. I want to make sure I get an oven that will work well for bread and that I can steam safely in. I am in Toronto Canada, any recommendations would be appreciated.

-D

dancer742's picture
dancer742

Honey WW Bread

I used to have a recipe for Honey WW Bread that contained molasses and honey and raised in the fridge overnight.  Any one have that recipe?  The honey, molasses, margerine was heated in water until warm.  It also called for powdered milk.  I later converted this recipe to have 12 grain cereal and sunflower seeds.  It was delicious.

ananda's picture
ananda

Weekend Baking, 26th-27th March 2011

 


A selection of breads made at home this weekend... 


•1.    BorodinskyDSCF1814


Utilising a scald, as the previous attempt; see here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22439/brief-report-young-baker-competition-and-weekend-bread-baking-home


The sour was built using 2 elaborations, with 18 hour fermentation time in between.   I started with 80g stock and ended up with 1040g of sour.


Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sour [see above]

 

 

Total Dark Rye Flour

30

360

Total Water

50

600

TOTAL

80

960

 

 

 

2. Scald

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

20

240

Malt Syrup

4.5

54

Black Strap Molasses

6

72

Coriander

1

12

Salt

1

12

Water

35

420

TOTAL

67.5

810

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

Rye Sour [from above]

80

960

Scald [from above]

67.5

810

Dark Rye Flour

23.5

282

Strong White Flour

26.5

318

TOTAL

197.5

2370

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

% hydration

85

-

 

Method:

  • Build the leaven as above. At the same time as preparing the final elaboration, 18 hours ahead of mixing the final paste, prepare the scald. Dissolve the malt, molasses and salt in the water, and bring to a rolling boil. Stir in the flour and coarsely ground coriander. Cover and leave to cool.
  • Combine scald, sour and both flours to form a paste. Bulk ferment for 1 hour.
  • Prepare a Pullman pan by lining with silicone paper. Scale 2kg of paste into the pan with wet hands, and smooth to shape. Make a "steamed pudding" with the remaining paste.
  • Proof time will be 2 - 3 hours. Bake from cold in an oven with a pan of water, raising the temperature to 160°C. Bake time of 2½ hours.
  • De-pan and cool on wires. Wrap in linen for 24 hours before slicing.DSCF1816DSCF1817DSCF1827DSCF1828

 

 

•2.    Pain au Leaven using both Rye Sour and Wheat Levain<DSCF1803/p>

Refreshment regime for rye sour is as above.   Wheat leaven also 2 elaborations, first of 8 hours, second of 4 hours.   This dough was retarded overnight and baked off the next day.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Total Strong Flour

17.9

150

Total Water

10.65

90

TOTAL

28.55

240

 

 

 

2. Rye Sour

 

 

Total Dark Rye Flour

7.1

60

Total Water

10.65

90

TOTAL

17.75

150

 

 

 

3. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

28.55

240

Rye Sour [from above]

17.75

150

Strong White Flour

75

630

Salt

1.8

15

Water

46.4

390

TOTAL

169.5

1425

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% hydration

67.7

-

 

Method:

  • Elaborate leavens as above.
  • Combine all the materials to form a dough, and mix until well-developed.
  • Bulk proof for 2 hours, then retard overnight
  • Shape and final proof for 5 hours [ I gave this maximum proof]
  • Bake with steam as 1 large loaf, for 1 hour
  • Cool on wires
  • DSCF1791DSCF1794DSCF1799 DSCF1801DSCF1806DSCF1811

•3.    Mixed Levains and Shoyu-Roasted Sunflower Seed Boule

Leaven cultures built as detailed above.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Total Flour

36.4

200

Total Water

21.8

120

TOTAL

58.2

320

 

 

 

2. Rye Sour

 

 

Total Dark Rye

8.2

45

Total Water

13.6

75

TOTAL

21.8

120

 

 

 

3. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

58.2

320

Rye Sour [from above]

21.8

120

Strong White Flour

45.4

250

Dark Rye Flour

10

55

Salt

1.6

9

Sunflower Seeds

16.4

90

Water

32.7

180

TOTAL

186.1 

1024

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

44.6

 

% hydration

68.1

 

 

Method:

  • Build the leavens.
  • Roast the sunflower seeds in shoyu under the grill, turning as necessary.
  • Combine all ingredients except the seeds and mix to form a soft dough. Develop this, then add the seeds and complete with a sequence of 4 "stretch and folds" over a 2 hour bulk proof.
  • Shape and prove in a brotform for 4 hours
  • Bake with steam for 45 minutes.
  • Cool on wires
  • DSCF1830DSCF1831

Borodinsky is for the main College Diversity Competition.

Large Boule had to be cut into prematurely, as I needed some lunch and that was the only bread available.

The Sunflower Seed bread is only just out of the oven, but straight to the freezer.   With the shoyu-roasted seeds, rye flour at nearly 20% and an ambitious 44.6% pre-fermented flour, I guess this loaf will pack a full punch in flavour.   Lovely crumb to it, for sure!

All good wishes

Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Has anyone had this happen?

Hi, Fellow TFL'ers


I'am sure many of you have baked recipes from Peter Reinhart's Wholegrain breads. Yesterday, I mixed a soaker and a BIGA for a 100% Whole wheat sandwich bread. When i woke up 8 hours later, i found that the soaker has inflated the plastic wrap to a dome.. i.e. My BIGA was outside, and the soaker was in the fridge. The BIGA was overproofed, and smelled of alcohol... What to do? My baking instincs pushed me to deflate it, shape it to a ball again, and then, freeze it..?!


The Soaker is outside now, iam at work, and the BIGA is in the freezer?! should i worry? I have not been there before.. does anyone know how many hours i need to take the BIGA out of the freezer in order for its temp. to come back to room temp..?


I'd appreciate your help..


(Edit: The BIGA is yeasted .. not sourdough)


(Edit: Added Pics: I still don't get it.. why do my panned loaves always burst at the sides.? I have shaped tightly, grease the pan well, Proofed well, steamed well..)



Here the Crumb exposes the flaws caused by the overproofed BIGA: Crumbly Texture, yet soft.



The flavor was Good.. not the best... as the alcohol produced by the excessive yeast fermentation of BIGA left an off-taste to the loaf.



In conclusion, This loaf will prove itself useful to my digestive tract... though will not please my tongue, nor my eyes..


khalid

CJRoman's picture
CJRoman

Can you "Pretzel" it?

I'm on a mission to perfect Pretzel Rolls and Buns...and see just what else on earth I can "Pretzel."


I know pretzel dough requires a lot of flour in order to be chewy...but the yield for rolls and buns is very disappointing.


I thought I'd try an Italina Bread recipe, something big and high-rise and just "pretzel" the dough before baking (dunk in baking soda bath). I reasoned that this type of bread expands more and so perhaps I will end up with a bigger more sandwhich-like result, that still tastes like a pretzel.


But now that I'm studying the ingredients. There really isn't much difference. For the bread, just more flour, oil instead of butter. The rise instructions are abou the same as well.


Question: am I destine to just create the same thing no matter which type of dough I use? Does the baking soda bath restrict the rise? How can I make bigger, softer pretzels for buns?


Also...I use instant yeast. I understand that DOESN'T need to be mixed with water in advance. Some recipes say throw it right in. Some recipes say mix it with *just* water first. Others say mix with water and sugar (and it REALLY starts to bubble!), so why the differences? In the end, is it all the same?

JoeV's picture
JoeV

Soft Prezels ala Alton Brown

Got the bug to make some soft pretzels the other day, so I pulled out Alton Brown's recipe and made a dozen. You can get the recipe from the Foodnetwork dot com. I add 1/2 oz. of additional water to bring the dough weight up to 36.25 oz, which gives me 12 pretzles at 3 oz. each. Alton calls for 8 pretzels at 4.5 oz. ea.. We like the smaller size, and freeze most of them, refreshing them in the microwave.


 



 



 



 


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