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txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Borodinsky - when it's baked in a cake tin


This is a 100% sourdough rye from the book "Bread Matter". that book is an excellent read but for some reason, this is the first recipe I made from it. Well, second actually, but that Russian Rye was a total disaster. I think there's a printing error in the formula, it just has too much water. Yes, I know pure rye breads should have very wet dough, clay like in fact, but that one was in the porridge territory. Anyhow, back to this Borodinsky - opposite of that Russian Rye, it's perfect. The formula is right on for everything. My husband is still just getting used to the taste of heavy rye, even he immediately liked it.


 


I did make one major change -- I know, I know, I seem to be incapable of sticking to instructions, but this time it's not my fault! Sort of. After I mixed the clay like dough, I discovered that I don't have a loaf tin that's the right size for this amount of dough. I don't want something that's too big since I want the bread to have some height, in a pinch, I used an oval Japanse cheese cake tin I got from China, it's pefect! about 60% full going in:



Almot to the top at the end of fermentation



And a little domed over after it's done:



- levain


rye starter (100%), 20g


rye, 90g


water, 190g


 


1. Mix and leave at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours. Mine was left for 20hours, very bubbly and sour.


 


- main dough


levain, 270g


rye, 230g


salg, 5g


coarsely grounded coriander seeds, 5g, plus more for topping


molasses, 20g


barley malt syrup, 15g


water, 90g


 


2. Mix everything, and dump into an oiled tin, smooth the top if necessary but try not to press it down, otherwise the dough mighth get into crease and make it hard to demold.


3. Rise for 2 to 5 hours, if the dough is a little over half of the tin going in, at the end of the rise, it should be just below the top. Mine was left at 23C for 2.5 hours, my rye starter is lightening fast.


4. Brush water on top and spread a layer of coarsely grounded coriander seeds


5. Bake at 430F for 10min, then 400F for 40min. Maybe my cake tin doesn't conduct heat well, but at that point I took it out and the bread is not nearly done. I put it back and baked at 400F for another 20min, perfect. Wrapped for 36 hours before cutting in.



 


Nice even crumb, still a bit bottom heavy but getting there. I think I prefer a "not so warm" rise for my sourdough rye, as supposed to the "very warm temp" what most books suggests. It's moist but not sticky, very flavorful. I decide that I really like coriander in my breads.



 


I was complaining about not being able to find rye flour in local grocery stores, Eric pointed me to fresh ground Rye from Country Creations (flourgirl51), I got two huge bags, and that''s what I use in my rye breads these days. Very flavorful and great price/service.



Completely unrelated, here's a Chocolate-Almond torte I whipped up to use up some egg whites, very good.



 


The recipe is from "Pure Dessert", but can be found here. The recipe asked for a 9inch pan, I used an 8 inch, worked out wel.



 


Easy to make and VERY VERY VERY delicious, especially if you like dark chocolate. Perfect with a little whipped cream.



Sending to Yeastspotting.

Przytulanka's picture
Przytulanka

Pear bread


I have never been a big fan of pears. I eat only a few per year. But when I saw those I decided to buy a few. They were delicious. Their beauty inspired me to bake this bread.



Soaker:
453 g water


283g whole rye flour-stone ground
453 whole wheat flour

 Mix the flours and water until the dough comes together and you have a sticky mass and put the container in the refrigerator for 12 hours 
Starter:
125 g water
125 g whole rye flour
25 g whole rye starter


Final dough:
all soaker from refrigerator
255 g starter
Mix the ingredients (it's not easy) and let rest 30 minutes.
Add salt work it through the dough. Let rest 30 minutes. Fold the dough and let rest 30 minutes. Repeat the procedure once more.
Allow the dough to ferment for 4 hours at room temperature.

Shaping:


Flatten the dough into a disc, put 100 g of pistachio nuts (toasted, salted) and pear cut in to pieces. Fold in each side, and then the bottom. . Turn the dough over and shape your pear. Try to shape thick neck to prevent from burning during baking. Use XL raisin or dried plum to make stem end of the pear. Place the pear on peel with parchment . Cover with plastic to avoid drying the dough.

After 3-hour proofing preheat the oven to 500F with a.baking stone. Prepare 1 cup of  hot water for steaming.Score the loaf.
Bake:
15 minutes-480 F
15 minutes -450F
Remove  the parchment, cover the bread with foil (it's brown enough) and bake 10 minutes in 400F.


 Adapted from the recipe from: Discovering Sourdough and inspired by http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2010/01/31/pear-buckwheat-bread/

 

Syd's picture
Syd

Do you allow your sourdough to double during bulk fermentation?

Was wondering what everyone else does: do you allow your sourdough to double during bulk fermentation?  I always have, but had really good results with a much shorter ferment this past weekend and now am questioning my past techniques. 


 


I have always puzzled over recipes that talk about a DDT of 76F and then a bulk ferment of only 2 and a half hours.  It always amazed me how on earth they managed to double in that time.  (I have always taken it for granted that recipes implied the dough should double during bulk ferment.  Now I am thinking  I have been mistaken).  And this coming from recipes where people say their starter matures in 8 to 12 hours.  I have a much more vigorous starter:  it will double in 3, triple in 4 -5 and force its way out of a wire clamp jar in 6 hours.  I usually only use a small amount of starter in my recipes (not more than 15% of the total flour comes from the starter).  However, I live in a very warm climate and our kitchen is always somewhere between 27 and 31 degrees C.  Even under those warm conditions with my vigorous starter I can't match the optimistic proofing times of most recipes. 


 


This got me thinking that perhaps not every recipe meant for the dough to double during bulk fermentation.   So this past weekend I gave a new light rye loaf I have been working on a 2 and a  half  hour bulk ferment.  My dough temp after mixing was 26C which is about 76F.  I let it ferment at room temp for 2 and a half hours.  Shaped it, let it rise until 3/4 risen and then retarded it for 10 hours.  The result was delicious.  Mild but full of flavour.  The crust, especially, was intensely flavoured.  I can't wait to try again this weekend.


 


The advantages of not letting it double during the bulk ferment seem to be: 


It produces a milder sourdough, which is what I like.  No overt tang but full of flavour.


It is easier to shape.  No huge fermentation bubbles to shape around and the gluten hasn't started to degrade as it often can with very long bulk fermentations. 


I can't seem to find any disadvantages.  It certainly didn't compromise flavour but perhaps I did make up for it with the longish retard.  The only thing I wasn't satisfied with was the height of the loaf.  Even though the crumb was tender and full of the right sized holes, it slumped a little and didn't stand up as high and proud as my white sourdough boules usually do.  I can only attribute this to the 20 percent rye flour in the recipe.  (I have only very recently begun to work with rye and shaping it is a whole different ball game).  Perhaps I should have baked straight from the fridge as I always do.  I find baking from the fridge allows the dough to keep its shape better.  Perhaps I should have included some ascorbic acid or added an extra fold during bulk ferment. 


 


Anyway, that is my story and I was just wondering what everybody elses opinions on the bulk ferment were.  Is it at all necessary for the dough to double?  I always do with my yeasted loaves but I think that is necessary for flavour development and it doesn't seem to interfere with shaping.  Sourdough can be much more delicate, though (especially rye breads).  The length of the fermentation will also depend on the dough temp and the room temp where the bulk fermentation takes place.  But is there a guide as to how much the dough should increase in volume?  Would love to hear your thoughts/experiences.


Syd

hilo_kawika's picture
hilo_kawika

Citric acid as a preservative

I really have enjoyed baking ~ 3# size loaves of pane integrale (25% whole wheat, 75% bread flour, 70% hydration) using a pre-ferment that uses ~ half of the total amount of flour used.  But I've been having issues with the bread molding before I and friends could finish it.  Having read so much in TFL about sourdough breads that have longer keeping qualities but also having found the whole sourdough thing to be too much work for my personal bread baking style, I decided to do a small experiment.  I began adding food quality citric acid to the loaves I bake in increasing quantities until I reached a point at which the bread keeping quality was extended to 5-6 days but I still couldn't detect the flavor of the citric acid.  For me this was using 1/4 tsp of citric acid in a 3# loaf.  The citric acid is added to the dry ingredients (along with fine-grained salt) during the second day just before adding the water, yeast and pre-ferment.


If anyone wishes, I will post the complete recipe.


aloha,


Dave Hurd, Hilo, Hawaii

BNLeuck's picture
BNLeuck

Procrastinator's Sandwich Bread: Take 2

 


 


Procrastinator's Sandwich Bread: Take 2


Continued from Procrastinator's Sandwich Bread.


So, while I was impressed with the taste and texture of the previous PSB, I still don't like the idea of all white bread. I grew up on white bread; my mother bought sandwich loaves from the grocery store like most busy moms, especially since she had little talent in yeasted baking, and my grandfather's specialty was potato bread. And while tasty, and surely better than the store-bought loaves, it still wasn't any paragon of nutrition. It took me a long time to like the taste of whole grains, but now I seemed to have flipped the other way... I don't really like white bread. I'll tolerate it, but I prefer whole grain.


And to make it even more difficult, I don't really like wheat -- at least, by itself. I find it bitter, and frankly, I don't do bitter. But I love rye, and barley, and corn, and oats, and... well, you get the picture. I actually really like white wheat, because of its less-bitter taste, but it's much harder to find for a good price. Red wheat is plentiful and cheap, so I just find it easier to mix it with other grains, or sweeten it, etc. Even white wheat has a bold flavor, though. You notice it right away. This isn't a bad thing, but it isn't what I wanted in this bread. I wanted subtle, behind-the-scenes flavor. The kind that makes you go, "Hmm, what is this? This is different. This is good."


So I chose barley. Mild, slightly sweet, and a perfect backdrop for the flax already in the recipe. This time, I chose to use only 1 cup of barley flour and 4 cups of bread flour. I need to know the threshold of the bread, when it goes from just enough whole grains to too much. I intend to gradually step up the amount of barley flour I use until I find it negatively affects the texture, flavor, and/or ease of use of the bread. I don't want to have to coddle this bread because it has whole grains. If I have to coddle it, I won't make it regularly. And that sort of defeats the purpose, doesn't it?


I show the recipe below for one loaf, though I doubled it this time around and made two loaves. Honestly, this dough is so easy to handle even by hand, I would make massive batches at once, but I only have one oven and two loaf pans. I'm sure if you scaled this out and made a baker's dozen it wouldn't be much more work than it is for one. I scaled back the yeast some this time, to see if it still rose quickly -- I noted little difference in rise times but a big difference in taste. Also, I used half buttermilk, half 1% milk this time around, and sprinkled with barley flakes instead of the 7-grain cereal. Very tasty! Though the barley flakes like to fall off some...


Procrastinator's Sandwich Bread: Barley Edition


 



  • .25c butter

  • 1c 1% milk

  • 1c reduced fat buttermilk

  • 2tbsp granulated sugar

  • 2tsp kosher salt

  • 4c bread flour

  • 1c barley flour

  • 1tbsp instant yeast

  • 2tbsp vital wheat gluten

  • 2tbsp ground flax seed

  • more milk for brushing

  • 1-2tbsp barley flakes (or topping of choice)


 


 



  1. Melt butter in microwave in a large measuring cup or bowl. (1 min on HIGH for me.)

  2. Add milk and heat to lukewarm. (1 more min on HIGH for me.)

  3. Add sugar and salt and stir to dissolve.

  4. Combine flours, yeast, gluten, and flax in a large bowl/the bowl of a stand mixer.

  5. Add liquid and mix to "shaggy mass" stage.

  6. Knead by hand or mixer until elastic. Dough will NOT clean bowl or form a ball; this is fine.

  7. Let rise until double, about 35 mins.

  8. Shape into a loaf, and put in greased 9x5in pan.

  9. Preheat oven to 350F; let dough rise 25-30 mins.

  10. Brush with milk and sprinkle barley flakes on top, then score loaf as desired. (I always do mine diagonally, corner to corner.)

  11. Bake for 25 mins uncovered, with steam, then cover with foil and bake another 20-35 mins, until internal temp is 190F.


Pictures to come tomorrow, when I un-lazy enough to upload them to my computer. LOL

 


 


 

veeanoo's picture
veeanoo

Zucchini Bread

Hi...can anyone please give me a recipe for zucchini bread..but not the sweet version....I would like a savory version....thanks

amolitor's picture
amolitor

Oatmeal bread -

 


My wife likes oatmeal and things made with oatmeal, so she requested a bread made with oatmeal. This is the result:


bouillie



  • 1/4 cup oatmeal (would have used more, but that's all we had)

  • 1/4 Bob's Red Mill 7 grain hot cereal

  • 1/4 cup barley flour

  • 1 cup boiling water


Mix, let stand overnight, covered.


poolish



  • 1/8 tsp rapid rise yeast (it's what we have -- I'd prefer 1/4 tsp regular dried yeast)

  • 1 cup bread flour

  • 1 cup warm water


Proof yeast in water, mix in flour thoroughly. Let stand overnight, covered.


In the morning:


Proof 1/8 tsp yeast (rapid rise, I'd use 1/4 tsp dried yeast if I had it) in about 2 T warm water.


Sprinkle 1 T salt on the bouillie (I will use 2 tsp next time, see notes below) and mix, then add poolish and yeast mixture above to bouillie and mix. Mix in flour until it looks like the right hydration (I was aiming for 66 percent or thereabouts -- but see notes below!). I was assuming this would come out to 1 1/2 cups or so, but it was somewhat less, perhaps 3/4 cup, before things started to look like the sort of moist dough I wanted. Autolyse thirty minutes, then knead for moderate dough development. During kneading, something began to give water back -- the dough rapidly turned into a very moist dough, and felt like 70 to 75 percent hydration. I kneaded it wet for a time, just to see what would happen (if something suddenly gace BACK a bunch of water, I didn't want to panic, add a bunch more flour, and then have whatever it was suck the water up again!). I wound up adding 1/4 to 1/2 cup more flour in towards the end of kneading.


Bulk rise 2 hours with S&F every hour. Retard in fridge for a couple of hours, this was purely for scheduling reasons. Warm for an hour, S&F, warm another 30 minutes, form a boule. Proof until ready.


Bake at 450 for 20 minutes, reduce heat to 425 for 25 minutes. The result:




 


The flavor is wonderful. The crumb is a sort of alarming grey, but that's just the oatmeal. You can't feel the 7-grain cereal (which is a hearty cracked grain thing) but you can see it in there. I was looking for a more open crumb, but I probably wound up overworking it in my struggles with apparent hydration. As you can see it was a trifle underproofed (frankly, it may still have been cool from the fridge inside) and my scoring.. sucks.


When I do it again:



  • less salt, 2 tsp not 1 T as indicated. The flavor is wonderful, and also salty!

  • more flour initially (in the mixing pre-autolyse)


It seems as if the whole grains absorbed more liquid than I expected, which is partly why I wound up oversalting. Also, I can't do arithmetic well. Anyways. ALSO I think that when I started to knead the oatmeal started to give up the water it had soaked up, so my apparent hydration shot up (i.e. it started feeling REALLY WET). The lesson here is to mix it to quite firm in the bowl, I'm going to try for more of a 55 percent hydration "feel" in the bowl, a firm American Bread kind of feel, then autolyze, and then knead. I am hoping that the oatmeal (or whatever it was) will give up water again, and bring me back to my nice moist dough for the bulk rise.


I think I will also proof my second yeast (the yeast that goes into the dough mixture in the morning) in 1/4 cup warm water, to allow for more bread flour to be mixed in to hit my target hydration. I wanted a somewhat larger loaf than I got, since the whole grains soaked up more water than I expected. I'd really like to get that 1 1/2 cups of bread flour into the dough, and I simply need more water than I had. So, the next version of this recipe I will be using uses the bouillie and poolish as above, and:


Proof 1/8 tsp rapid rise yeast (or 1/4 tsp regular dry yeast) in 1/4 cup warm water. Sprinkle 2 tsp salt onto the bouillie and mix, then mix in the poolish and the proofed yeast. Next, mix in flour to get a firm dough (approx 1 1/2 cups). Autolyse 30 minutes, knead to moderate development. Bulk rise 2-3 hours with S&F hourly. Retard a couple of hours in the fridge (or not, as you like, really). Warm to room temp with hourly S&F for a couple hours, shape, proof, bake as above!


 

qahtan's picture
qahtan

cheese fabulous cheese

these are the most fabulous cheese cookies ever.


http://saltandserenity.com/2010/08/13/les-fougeres-cheese-biscuits/


 


Les Fougeres Cheese Biscuits
SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Den Lepard's Roasted Potato Focaccia

I am saving Txfarmer's 36 hour baguettes for next weekend, when I'll be home (for a few days) with my dear, powerful oven... ;-)


 


In my present situation, I opted for a simpler baking adventure, and made Lepard's focaccia, which turned out DELICIOUS!   I include a photo here, and for those interested in the description, a link to my blog


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.com/2010/10/03/roasted-potato-and-olive-focaccia/


 


Good thing I went for a tough run this morning, it's the only way to counteract the calories packed in this baby... :-)


 



 


 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Bread, Art, Heritage: Katy and Rebecca Beinart's Work and a Simple White Sourdough Tin Loaf

 

 

Picture Triptych: Katy at the community oven 1, Oxford, UK; Bread made by Daisy_A with Katy's starter and sourdough tin recipe, against English lavender; Katy & Rebecca Beinart, 'Borscht and Black Bread', Performance, March 2010. Photo: R Beinart. Live event at Malmesbury Museum, Western Cape, South Africa, with kind permission

I have been baking so much I have a backload of blogging. However I need do justice to this really interesting art project, that centres around bread and baking. 

In May we were privileged to catch up with artist Katy Beinart who was taking part in a festival in a community garden in Oxford, UK. As part of her art practice Katy has been tracing her ancestors' migrations from Russia, Belarus and Lithuania to England, Australia and South Africa via their stories, but also the parallel movement of plants and bread cultures. 

For the festival Katy introduced plants to the garden, which are familiar in the UK but which hail originally from Eastern Europe. These were then linked with the stories of individual family members. Beetroot (Beta vulgaris), for example, represented Moishe/Morris Schreibman, (born 1884, Pinsk, Belarus, died 1929, London, UK). Katy records that he came to London to find work as a carpenter, sailing from Bremmen on the "Sperber" and staying briefly at the Poor Jews Shelter in Whitechapel, in London's East End. He married Sarah Gitovich and they lived off Brick Lane, where he also ran a cabinet making business. Katy notes that Sarah, also known as Zlata (born Gomel, Belarus, date unknown, died London, UK 1975), left her country of birth with an uncle to escape pogroms. She never saw her family or the family dairy farm again and when Moishe/Morris died she brought up 8 children on her own. Sarah was represented by Dill (Anethemum graveolens). 

On the day of the festival Katy was also baking bread in a dirt oven that her sister Rebecca Beinart (also an artist), had built along with community garden members. The loaf baked was a white sourdough tin, from a Eastern European recipe that Katy had sourced. 

The bread baking is a fascinating project, part of Katy and Rebecca's wider recuperation and representation of family ties and migrations on their father's side in the Origination project. More information is available on this link.

As part of the wider art project Katy and Rebecca followed a family migration route to South Africa, taking their 'bread-making suitcase' with them on board the transport ship The Green Cape, crewed by predominantly Polish sailors. They chose to sail because this is what their forebears would have done. The transport carrier was the main type of craft now sailing from the UK to South Africa. Katy used their starter to bake bread on board ship, which the sisters shared with the crew. 

Breadmaking suitcase; Katy & Rebecca Beinart, 'Breadmaking', Action, 2010. Photo: Rebecca Beinart, with kind permission; Rebecca Beinart, 'Sal Somnia Omnit', Action, 2010. Photo: Douglas Gimberg, with kind permission.

Once in South Africa the Beinarts baked and shared bread with newly-encountered family members. In some cases they also tried to recreate meals like those their ancestors may have eaten and ate in the places they occupied, including a bare salt pan that once formed part of a family business!  As part of the continuation of the project in the UK, Katy was facilitating her starter's 'migration' to other bread makers. This is how I came to leave Oxford with a small pot of Katy's starter and a recipe to bake in my own home. 

Rebecca, whose practice links art, ecology and politics also has a project involving sourdough cultures called Exponential Growth. Developed as a commission for the University of Loughborough it charts the local, national and global networks into which Rebecca's Loughborough born starter is dispersed. More information is available on these links Radar Arts and Exponential Growth

Rebecca handing out starter culture on Loughborough Market; c.Rebecca Beinart/Exponential Growth 2010, with kind permission

Please note: important information on Exponential Growth and an invitation to contribute to a Bread Fair in Loughborough, UK on Saturday 23 October 2010, and/or to contribute to the mapping of the culture's journey as an international baker is included at the end of the blog in bold type. It would be great if some bakers from TFL could take part! Let's push out the boundaries - info on this link  and below.

Reflections

These initiatives seem to me to touch on so many themes on TFL, including the migration of breads, recipes and starters between countries and the way in which bread is such a strong link to memory, family and place. 

It also touches on the question, raised regularly on the board, of the degree to which starters change when transplanted.  Does a San Francisco starter remain the same in Oxford, Toronto, Tokyo, Madrid? Katy noted that her relatively new starter behaved very differently in the hot South African climate. 

The Beinarts' Origination project also delicately raises wider questions about how people change and adapt when they migrate from one place to another, while also striving to retain familiar characteristics and practices  Much of this human culture can also be traced in bread baking practices. What changes, what remains the same? How far can migration routes be traced by the emergence of similar recipes in different countries? How intense is the link between early memories of bread and personal and family histories? 

This last question is something leading bakers also reflect on. Jeffrey Hamelman, for example, recalls 'My earliest memories may be of bread. One of my grandmothers was Polish or Russian, depending on where the ever-changing boundary line happened to be drawn at a given time […] Gram always had bread' (Bread, p. 5). In the opening paragraph of his book Artisan Breads Jan Hedh relates 'My mother made nearly all the breads, biscuits and cakes for the family, and I remember the lovely smell and the wonderful flavours that awaited me as I returned from school'. (p.13)

On TFL bakers also strive to recreate for themselves, friends and family.much-loved breads enjoyed in childhood or remembered from another country. Some bakers share or seek recipes from their countries of origin or foreign countries they lived in when younger. Others reflect on why certain national recipes are well-known abroad whereas other have not travelled, even when their some of their original bakers have emigrated. Bakers also celebrate well-loved bread recipes that have taken root and are developed and enjoyed in a new place: Stan and Norm's project, which I have read about with great interest seems a great example of this. In the best cases the culture just keeps on growing, in all senses of the word.

 

Baking the bread

When I took on a sample of Katy's starter as part of the involvement of other bakers in this project it behaved very differently to my own. A year after her return from South Africa Katy's starter was much more stable than my own, which were still young and unruly. Whereas my starters tore through dough when well fed on the bench and lay down and refused to move after a stay in the fridge, Katy's raised dough well and reliably and regained strength much more quickly after refrigeration. Katy's starter was kept around 125% hydration. It also had a different scent and flavour, with a keen tang like a good cheese. 

When used to bake the recipe given to me by Katy, the starter raised the dough well and produced an even crumb, aerated with small, well spaced holes. At this point in my baking I had had a breakthrough with using an oven stone and steam to produce a good crust. I also used Marriage's strong white bread flour which I have found to be very good for artisan bread. The bread came out with a strong, golden crust.  The crumb was as shown in the picture at the top of this blog:

The flavour of the bread was milder than I am used to with mixed grain formulae, yet it was pleasant, with a lovely mouth feel. It kept well and we enjoyed it with both savoury and sweet toppings. 

When we met Katy again at a talk she gave at Modern Art Oxford, she added that she was moving on to try rye in loaves, as used in other bread-making traditions in Eastern Europe and that she was happy for bakers to adapt her original recipe. However, given that this was the very recipe that she used while on board ship and in South Africa, I wanted to follow in that line. 

The lean sourdough tin recipe used by Katy and Rebecca is given below: 

Very simple Wheat Sourdough

Makes two large loaves

Stage 1: Evening

200-250g Wheat Starter Culture (use a little less if your culture is very bubbly & active)

450g white bread flour

700ml water

Mix together in a bowl into a sloppy dough. Cover and leave overnight somewhere warm.  Now feed the original starter mix with 150g flour and 150-200ml water to replace what you took out.

Wheat sourdough takes less time than rye. If it’s in a warm place, stage 1 can take just 5-6 hours, so you can start it off on the morning and bake in the afternoon if this fits your schedule.

The next morning

450g white bread flour (or add half wholemeal flour

2-3 teaspoons salt

Mix the flour and salt into the existing bowl of dough that you left overnight. Knead it by hand in the bowl – it is a very wet and sticky dough, but it should feel elastic. If it feels too wet, add a little more flour. Work on it for about 10 minutes until it’s smooth and elastic. Rest it for 10 minutes. Mix it again for another couple of minutes.

Oil two large bread tins well, then dust generously with flour. Divide the dough and put into tins, they should be just over half full. Cover tins with an upturned bowl, leaving space for the dough to rise. Leave it to rise in a warm place. Depending on the heat and the liveliness of the culture this will take between 2 and 5 hours.

Baking

Once the dough has risen to the top of the tins, you’re ready to bake. As you get to know the timings you can be cunning and pre-heat the oven so it’s hot at the right time.

Place the tins in the oven at 220◦C/ Gas 7. Bake for 30 minutes. Then remove the bread from the tins and bake for a further 10-15 minutes to form a good crust. The loaves should sound hollow when you tap the bottom. Remove from tins and leave them to cool before cutting.

Exponential Growth

As part of the Exponential Growth project there will be a Bread Fair in Loughborough (UK), Town Hall on Saturday October 23rd. from 2/2/30 p.m. 'Culture caretakers' have been invited to this event to share their breads and to enter a competition in which breads will be judged on 'Regional specificity; Flavour; Appearance; Originality of recipe; Method of passing on the culture'.  

There are currently 93 caretakers but there is still time for more people to join! If you would like to have some of the Loughborough culture and/or attend this event please contact Rebecca on radar.info@lboro.ac.uk

As part of the wider project Rebecca is recording on world map how far the culture has travelled globally. It would be great if some TFLers felt that they could contribute to this part of the project. 

If you are interested please contact Rebecca asap on radar.info@lboro.ac.uk with a mailing address and she will send out a sample, postage paid. The bread baked can be your own recipe, or one that relates to this project in terms of geography and culture. It does not have to be the recipe given in this blog. Of course if you do bake, don't forget to share on TFL! 

   

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