The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Willowlady's picture
Willowlady

Hostess Made Home Pride Bread

Hello, I love this site with all the helpful folks and while I mostly read and bake on my own in my little kitchen I am hoping someone can help me with  little delimma.  My family likes the Home Pride Bread that Hostess makes/made.  Is there any recipes that can duplicate that.  A google search did not turn up any results to help me out.  They also eat what I bake however that bread was a go to for several occasions for sandwiches for some reason.  So if I can recreat it then I would be and they too very grateful.  I await any responses and thank you all in advance for your consideration.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Thanksgiving Multi-Grain Marble Chacon

After the difficult and tedious Not So Stollen bake earlier in the week, we decide to continue our Thanksgiving bake list with something much simpler, less stressful even if not as enjoyable.

  

After seeing Toady Tom’s fantastic large miche bake and the excellent crust he managed to put on it, we decided to do a large loaf too only using the chacon shape we love to make since it too can produce a beautiful crust if it naturally splits where we would like as it springs and blooms in the oven heat.

  

We also wanted to try out a toasted wheat germ, soft white wheat extract and oat bran component similar to Toad’s to see what it tasted and looked like in the chacon.  All but 10g went into the dark side.

 

Instead of using our recent 1  starter and 24 hour counter levain development we went back to our roughly 20% seed levain for the SD starter required for this bake.   One levain was Rye Desem combo SD for the heartier darker portion of the loaf that has 2all of the whole grains listed for the starter. 

  

The other levain was a YW one that was fed with cake meal, another new ingredient for bread making for us.  Many folks use this ground matzo altus for their lemon, poppy seed walnut cakes or possibly a chiffon cake of any number of possible flavors.  We decided to try it out in the whiter portion of this bread only to see what it tasted like and how it performed in two different kinds of bread.

  

The instant coffee and the cocoa were only used in the dark portion to, you guessed it, make it darker than the light colored portion.  We also used some yogurt whey water for some of the liquid in both portions with 2/3rds of it going into the dark side.  The sprouts were also split between the two sides in the same proportion as the whey water - 2/3rds to the dark. 

  

In order to finish the breakout, the white portion ended up being 500 g with 100 g of the AP and bread flour and 80 g of the whole grains in the bread flour and 10g of the toasted bits.  Total flour and toasted stuff was 290 g and the liquid was 210 g (42 g whey) for a little over 72.4% hydration not counting any of the 1/3 of the sprout total that went into it.

  

With the malts, oats, and potato flakes on in the dark side the hydration of it was 82%.

The fun part was putting together the largest chacon we have ever made.  The center knotted roll is made from the light side and the side going down into the basket is sprinkled with rice flour.  It was surrounded by a twisted rope from the dark side.   The 4 other knotted rolls, on the cardinal direction points, were made from equal portions of dark and light that were ropes twisted together to make one rope.  The 4 little balls between the 4 twisted knotted rolls were from the light side.  Remember to rice flour anything that will touch the basket so it doesn't stick - and don't rice flour anything else so it sticks together.

 

What was left over was two light ropes that were placed on the spread out remaining dark side.  The long sides of the dark were folded over the light ropes to encapsulate them making a long rectangle.  The shot sides of the rectangle were folded over to the middle making a near square where the corners were folded into the center making a circle that was quickly shaped as a boule.

 

This boule was pressed out gently into a large bialy with the center indentation equal in size to the circle of knotted rolls, ropes and balls already in the basket.  The large bialy was floured around the edge that would contact the basket with rice flour and flipped over so the indentation covered the knotted rolls and the assembly was basically flat on top when finished. 

We hope this assembly will make a very pleasing marbled look when the chacon is cut.  Otherwise it was a waste of time and effort…something every baker is well used to if they have been baking more than a couple of minutes with an apprentice that is nearly all paws, bark and ankle bite.

The levains were formed by mixing, letting them double over about 4 hours or so and then chucking them in the fridge for 24 hours to build the labs while suppressing the yeast.   The flours and toasted bits were autolysed with the liquids and the salt for 2 hours as the levains came back to room temperature a day later.

Once the autolye and the levain were combined for each, the gluten was developed with 15 minutes of French slap and folds.  Then 4 sets of S&F’s wee done fpor each where the sprouts were incorporated on the 3rd set.  The dough’s were allowed to develop for 1 ½ hours on the counter before being retarded in a36 F fridge for 15 hours.

 

They were allowed to warm up for 1 ½ hours before being formed into the chacon and the allowed to proof at room temperature for 2 hours before firing up old Betsy and her16”round stone,  to preheat at 500 F for 20 minutes before 2 of Sylvia’s steaming pans were added.

After 45 minute of total pre-heat the chacon was un-molded easily from the basket using parchment and peel.  It slid into the oven off the peel when a 1/2 C of water was thrown into the bottom of the oven for extra initial steam and the door closed.  The temperature was turned down to 450 F the steaming was done at the 20 minute mark when the pans were removed and the temperature turned down to 425 F, convection this time.

In another 20 minutes the bread was exactly 205 F in the middle and beautifully and evenly brown from rotating it 90 degrees on the stone every 5 minutes after the steam came out.  At the 40 minute total mark, we turned off the heat and left the oven door ajar as the chacon continued to crisp on the stone for another 10 minuets before removal to the cooling rack.

The chacon didn't spring all that much and might have been a little over proofed but it did bloom and crack as expected.  It is a very pretty large chacon and we can’t wait for it to cool down and rest for awhile before we cut it ....   and see if anything interesting happened inside.

Now that it is cut..... the light and dark did learn to play well together.  We are pleased that it is so pretty on the inside and fitting for such a gorgeous outside.   The crumb is fairly open for so many add ins and whole grains.  The dark is tangy sour while the white is a little sweet, maybe sue to the Cake meal, has no tang and is a little moister as YW tends to impart in crumbs everywhere.  A very nice combination of two tastes.  The toasted bits tend to come through more on the dark side and the millet crunch is prevalent throughout.  This bread will have to to to the top of the chacon list and into the top 15 of our all time top 5 favorites.  I'm glad we made a big one.

Formula

Combo Starter

Build 1

%

SD Desem & Rye Sour

30

3.01%

Bulgar

20

2.56%

Dark Rye

20

2.56%

Kamut

20

2.56%

Buckwheat

20

2.56%

Spelt

20

2.56%

Whole Wheat

20

2.56%

Yeast Water

60

7.69%

Ground Flax

20

2.56%

Cake Meal

80

10.26%

Water

140

17.95%

Total Starter

450

39.74%

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

 

Hydration

97.25%

 

Levain % of Total

17.88%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Whole Spelt

25

3.21%

Dark Rye

25

3.21%

Whole Wheat

25

3.21%

Whole Kamut

25

3.21%

Bulgar

25

3.21%

Buckwheat

25

3.21%

Cake Meal

50

3.21%

Oats

20

2.56%

Instant Potato Flakes

20

2.56%

Bread Flour

245

31.41%

AP

245

31.41%

Dough Flour

730

93.59%

 

 

 

Whey 125 and Water

610

78.21%

Dough Hydration

83.56%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

998

 

Total Water & Whey Water

822

 

T. Dough Hydration

82.36%

 

Whole Grain %

43.19%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

78.94%

 

Total Weight

2,517

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Red Multi-grain Malt

3

0.38%

Barley Malt

20

2.56%

White Multi-grain Malt

3

0.38%

Total

26

3.33%

 

 

 

Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

WW

25

3.21%

Rye

25

3.21%

Quinoa

25

3.21%

Buckwheat

25

3.21%

Millet

25

3.21%

Bulgar

25

3.21%

Spelt

25

3.21%

Total Sprouts

175

22.44%

 

 

 

Toasted Bits

 

%

Toasted Germ, Oat Bran & Extraction

50

6.41%

  10 g each of instant coffee and cocoa went into the dark side only.

Skibum's picture
Skibum

NY Deli Rye with garlic and rosemary

I have been for the last couple of weeks using a nearly pure rye sourdough starter and have baked nothing but the New York Deli recipe from P. Reinhart's BBA.  I love the addition of the fried onions.  So far I have added the onions to the final dough and at some pont I will try adding them to the starter to see if it makes a difference.  For my last bake, I reduced the fried onion and added garlic to cook lightly, but not brown.  With the heat off, I added the caraway seed and fresh rosemary.

This bread has a really nice subtle garlic, onion and rosemary flavour and just screams out for a large pile of corned beef or pastrami lathered with both hot and grainy mustard.  Darn, that could have been an apres ski dinner, but the deli is closed . . .

I had incredible oven spring from this loaf.  Next bake I will also include a post proof, pre-bake photo.  I have now had 3 consecutive success's baking with my rye sourdough and will share what has worked very well for me.  Pre bake I refresh the mother rye starter as follows:

25 g seed

50 g light rye flour

40 g water

This is mixed well in a measured container and left to at least double.  This has taken anywhere from 4 to 28 hours depending on when the mother starter was last refreshed -- I do it weekly now.  After the initial build had doubled or more, I went to a second build:

115 g first build

60 g light rye flour

60 g strong bread flour

96 g water

The second build has consistently doubled or more in about an hour.  For this bake I had to put it in the fridge after a half hour as it was a ski day.  Six hours later, I removed the second build from the fridge and it had nearly overflowed the container.  Time to get baking!

NY Deli Rye w/ garlic and rosemary

151 g second starter, (it is hard to hit 150 perfectly and decided not to be anal about things.  bread is so forgiving in that way!)

50 g light rye flour

151 g bread flour

30 g greek yogurt, full fat

30 g whole milk

100 g water

1 Tbs brown sugar

1 tsp caraway seeds, pounded in a mortar and pestle, they didn't reduce much

90 g finely chopped onion, fried, weighed before cooking

20 g coarsly chopped garlic, fried, weighed before cooking

1-11/2 tsp fresh minced rosemary, less than 1 g, my scale only weighs to full grams, not fractions and I should have spent the extra 5 bucks . . .

1 Tbs canola oil for frying the savourys

1/2 Tbs EVOO for the main dough mix

11/4 tsp salt

I have been adding the salt in the final couple of S&F's of late, thanks to reading Carol Field's The Italian Baker.  So mix well, rest for 5, mix well again, rest 10, then 4 S&F's with 10 rest.  After a 1 hour bulk rise this dough had more than doubled.  This starter works faster than commercial yeast!  Pre-shaped, rested 5 then shaped a loaf.  After 30 minutes it was oven on to my 500F max, then another 30 minutes proof.  Scored and baked with steam for 20 turning and removing the steam pan at the half.

This was a fun bake I was able to fit around my schedule and am enjoying the whole sourdough leavening process.  The sourdough preferments add great flavour, I find the final dough develops strength quickly and the finished bread keeps surprising well on the kitchen counter.

BakeON!  Brian

LisaE's picture
LisaE

My Starter (Culture) smells like paint thinner! HELP!

Hi there! I am trying to start a starter, and I desperately need some help and encouragement. I will give you a little history.

I started this with a recipe from a site other than this and I don't want to give a link cuz after smelling the starter after 4 days I was disgusted! Any way I started with 50 grams WW flour and 50 grams bottled water. Within 24 hours, it rose and bubbled so I thought I might have something going (from reading Sourdough Lady's Blog I now know it was not yeast yet). I fed it the same amounts flour and water, and waited, nothing, just goop. That went on for 4 days or so, and nothing, just smelly goop.

So I looked for some info on this site (great site by the way!) and found some advice that bwraith or Bill gave so I took 2 Tbsp starter and mixed in 2 Tbsp water, 3 Tbsp unbleached organic white (Bob's Red Mill) and a pinch of whole Rye (Bob's Red Mill Organic Dark Rye). It began to become less smelly, almost yeasty maybe, had bubbles in it, but never rose. I am on day 10 from beginning the whole mess and it has never risen, has bubbles but smells like I could strip some paint off a door with it.

By the way, it's at room temperature now, 72 - 75 degrees, I tried the oven light trick but the culture became a very warm 88 degrees and I thought that would be too hot.

I am about to throw it out and start again, using Sourdough Lady's recipe but thought I'd ask you all if you know what the heck. I read that the acetone smell is common if the yeast are starving but I have a hard time believing that since it hasn't risen since day 1. Any advice is very much appreciated and Thanks!

Lisa

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

Miche Maillard

I've been baking slight variations on this 2 kg miche weekly for a month or so and it's time to share.  It's very good.  So good that it's keeping me from moving on to my endless backlog of must-try formulae from books and TFL blogs. 

The objective here has been to bring the Maillard flavors normally confined to the crust (or the surface of a toasted slice), into and throughout the crumb of untoasted bread.  Nothing new or earthshaking about the concept:  David Snyder turned me on to it in his mention of adding toasted wheat germ to a miche at an SFBI class.  And of course the Red Malt about which Mr. Brownman has been schooling us recently is a close cousin.  Other significant influences here are Jeffrey Hamelman's Pain au Levain (process) and Phil's Tarlee Miche (levain building).

The arc of my journey with this formula over the past month has been toward more sieving & milling silliness, higher hydration and bolder baking.  The crumb is cakey-soft at 70%, with very pronounced Maillard flavors and pleasingly mild levain tang.  The crust in the bolder bakes has sung loudly (this past weekend, I thought it was hail on the skylight in the adjacent room) and has that delectably chewy je ne sais quois that boldly baked natural levain crusts provide.

Sieving & Milling Silliness.  The formula contains 3.5% each of 300-325˚F toasted>KA-milled*>50# sieved (pass-through) store-bought wheat germ and wheat bran.  The rationale for 3.5% is that wheat seeds are reportedly 83% endosperm.  So adding a total of 7% germ/bran results in a "90% extraction" flour.  Of course, it isn't "extracted", but synthesized, a la Rev. Sylvester Graham.  Purpose here is not improved nutrition, as was Rev. Graham's noble intent, but indulgent: more flavor and, from milling and 50# sieving, finer texture.  Crumb close-up above right shows barely detectable bits.  Which is good.  We don't care for bits in our table bread :-)  

Click on the table below for a working (once downloaded as .xls) BBGA format spreadsheet with process.

Levain building.  My stiff levain thrives on its Gerard Rubaud feed so well that I tend to use it in the first build (which means the bread has fractional %-ages of spelt, rye + whole wheat -- although I confess I've taken to 50# sieving my Rubaud Mix -- somebody stop me!).  In addition, I cold-retard the freshly mixed levain at each stage, straight to the fridge after kneading, for 12 to as much as 60 hrs before retrieving it to mature for 4-8 hrs @ 70-75˚F.  My levain loves it when I do that for weekly refreshment, so I've indulged its preference for a chilly prelude at each stage.  This stretches the process over more of the week, letting me feel like I'm doing some baking between weekends, even though it's just levain building.  Toasting wheat germ and bran at least gives me a chance to turn on the oven M-F :-).  I have not observed this early cold retard to sour the levain or final product the way retardation of levains or doughs that have partially or fully matured does.

More sieving & milling nonsense experiments are in the works, but none except dab-inspired malt ideas start with whole grains.  Plenty fun to be had with sieves & mill, and just store-bought flours, germ & bran.

Happy baking.

Tom

________________
*slightly hacked KA grain mill for finer milling (and warranty voiding no doubt) than possible with stock unit.

pattycakes's picture
pattycakes

Does anyone have a recipe for Irish style caramel squares?

My sisters and I had a bar cookie called a caramel square at the Irish Stud near Killkenny (if my memory serves me), in Ireland. It had perhaps a short crust, but I'm not sure of that detail. What I'm sure of is that the inside, the caramel part, was dry, not creamy caramel like every recipe out there. It almost had the kind of crumb that a malted milk ball would have if it weren't too hard. It had chocolate on top. I wrote to the Irish Stud and asked for the recipe and never heard back...anyone know what I'm talking about and have a recipe? If so, I would be forever indebted, as would anyone else who bakes it, because it's a great cookie. I'm a recipe developer, and I haven't a clue how they got that inside texture!

Many thanks!

Pattycakes

Sjadad's picture
Sjadad

PIZZA SUCCESS!

I have been on a quest to make truly great pizza in my home oven. A decade ago I bought a pizza stone and my results were dramatically improved. A few years later I figured out that finishing the baking under the broiler yielded better results still. Well, I found something called a "baking steel" when I was reading posts on the "Slice" section of seriouseats.com. It has changed my life (: I put my old baking stone, inverted, one level above the shelf with the steel and heated everything to 550F for a good hour. The results speak for themselves.

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Today's JH 5 Grain Levain Bake

Today I baked my 4th attempt at the JH 5 Grain Levain bread.  I don't mean to bore everyone with yet another post of this bread, but I would like to show everyone the help that David Snyder's tutorial post on scoring bread gave me.  I am finally producing some ears and slashes that are looking the way they should, along with some blooms that I could rarely accomplish before.  I still have a lot more practice ahead of me to say I am confident with scoring, but at least I am getting somewhere.  Thanks to members of this site like David, new bakers can really benefit from the lessons and suggestions given on this site. Also bakers like breadforfun, who post photos that inspire to bake better.  I will post the crumb photos when they have had time to cool and I can sneak into my local grocery store to use their professional slicing machine.  Shhh.

John

hornedfox's picture
hornedfox

Cheesey semolina bread

I made this last weekend even though I was really pleased with the results it should have spent a little longer in the oven maybe popped out of the tin for 10-15 minutes

 

100% flour

60% semolina

3% salt

3% instant dry yeast

10% garlic oil (I made my own, crushed 2 cloves of garlic in to hot oil and let it cool. I couldnt be bother to strain it so I chucked the lot in)

95% luke warm water

46% grated parmasan

46% sharp mature cheddar cut into small cubes

46% spicy mexican cheese cut into small cubes

I combined everything except the cheese to make a smooth dough with a paddle. I was worried about the salt content with the salt from the cheese so I reduced it a little. Then mixed with a dough hook for 5 mins. Add all the cheese mix until well combined. I put it in a well greased bowl at 21 C untill puffy. I greased an 8" round baking tin with olive oil Shapped the dough as a boule and put in the tin cover and let it rise for about and hour. I use a steam convection oven I set it to steam and 195C, when it got to temp I covered the tin with tented foil and put it in. Cooked for 30 mins took the lid off and cooked for a further 15 mins. Very tasty.

 

 

 

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Holiday + breadcrumbs + pumpkin and feta pie

Weekend dawn has surrendered to lazy rain and on our kitchen counter French toast soaks as the remainder of the house sleeps. 

A week ago we spent some time near the beach well away from the routine of our city life. Time spent on beaches and flying kites in the salted seabreeze rejuvenates the soul. During sunset walks we stepped over washed up jellyfish whilst gazing at distant whales breaching on the horizon. But most important of all we relaxed.

Back in Brisbane, I have landed some temp work with a design agency which is keeping my days full and my brain busy. It is nice to be challenged and I think the work will reward both my confidence and skills–which is exactly what I need right now.

Ever since I started baking I have always breadcrumbed my leftover bread, and the tempo of its use in our cooking matches the rate at which we collect stale bread–a perfect equilibrium! When grabbing a few slices of desem bread from the freezer for breakfast I noticed that my collection of stale bread ends had snowballed and contained all sorts of treasures like Tartine's Sesame Bread, Danish Rye, Desem, Miche and some Pain au Levain's with bold baked crusts.

These combined flavours in the breadcrumbs adds an exciting strength of flavour to the ready-made flavours available in caramel crusts. A caraway and cumin loaf is an exquisite addition if available! 

I have found the best time to approach making breadcrumbs is at the close of a weekend bread bake. After switching off the oven, the collection of stale bread is defrosted, cut into small cubes, spread on a baking tray and left on the cooling baking stone for the night. The following morning I check the brittleness of the bread cubes–there should be no softness at all–then in batches reduce them to fine crumbs in a food processor. Ear plugs are a luxury for this!

 


The flour milled with my Komo mill is used for more than just bread. I have been trialling shortcrust pastries made with freshly milled wheat sifted down to a dark high extraction flour with delicious results. This recipe is one of our favourite meals and has been made all the better by replacing the standard frozen shortcrust pastry the original recipe calls for. I have never seen children so eager to eat pumpkin as they are when presented with a slice of this pie.

 

Pumpkin and Feta Pie
Serves 6

200g high extraction four chilled (preferably freshly milled)
100g unsalted butter, chilled and cut into cubes
pinch of sea salt
2-3 tablespoons chilled water

Half a butternut pumpkin (squash) peeled and cut into 2cm (3/4 inch) cubes
4 garlic cloves unpeeled
4 tablespoons of olive oil
2 red onions halved and sliced
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon brown sugar
100g (3 1/2oz) crumbled feta cheese
1 tablespoon chopped rosemary 

  1. Put the flour, butter and pinch of salt in a food processor and process for 1 minute. Add the chilled water and process until the mixture comes together. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for a minimum of 2 hours.
  2. Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F). Spread the pumpkin and garlic on a baking tray and drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and bake for 30 minutes or until tender. Transfer the pumpkin to a large bowl and the garlic to a plate. Leave to cool.
  3. Meanwhile, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a pan. Add the onion and cook over medium heat for 10 minutes stirring occasionally. Add the sugar and vinegar and cook for a further 15 minutes or until the onion is a dark golden colour. Add to the pumpkin and allow to cool completely.
  4. Add the feta and rosemary to the pumpkin mix and squeeze the garlic out the skins into the mixture. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Roll out the pastry to a 35cm (14 inch) circle and place on a baking tray lined with baking paper. Arrange the pumpkin mixture over the top leaving a 4cm (1 1/2 inch) border. Fold over the pastry edges, pleating as you fold.
  6. Bake for 30 minutes or until pastry is crisp and golden.

 

The rain appears to have really set in and the garden is just soaking it up. So while we are housebound for the time being it seems there is no excuse for not getting stuck into some neglected housework ... before I get into trouble ... eeek!

Happy baking (and milling) everybody.

Cheers,
Phil

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