The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

50 % Whole Grain Sprouted 8 Grain SD/YW with Japanese Black Rice & Seeds

Lucy originally set out to do her take on combining Karin’s take on Maria Speck’s Aroma Bread and Karin’s Great Wild Rice bread.  Both of these breads are on our favorite list and on Lucy’s top three breads for various years.

 

But Aroma means aromatic seeds like caraway, anise coriander and fennel but you won’t find any in this bread because we forgot to put them in.  But, don’t let this keep you from adding them in your version.  With or without the bread won’t know the difference even though you might.

 

This is also our fist sprouted flour bread with lots of add ins in it too.  We subbed Japanese Black rice for the wild rice since, while still expensive half the cost of wild and nearly as tasty.  We sprouted some black rice too and put it in whole instead of grinding it into flour like the rest of the whole and sprouted grains.

 

Besides the BR, the other 7 grains were” Hayden Mills emmer (farro), spelt, rye, wheat, Kamut, Pima Club and Sonoran White from Ramona Farms.  Whole grains were 50% of the mix and half were sprouted and dried in our new dehydrator.  The white flour was KA bread flour.

 

We sifted out the hard bits and fed them to the SD 3 stage levain build and then retarded it for 24 hours in the fridge.  We also made a small 1 build, 12 hour, YW levain of 50 G that we made the next day which was ready in time for mixing it into the dough. 

 

We thought this dough would be on the heavier side with 200 G of seeds in the mix and a YW kicker should help open the crumb some even if on the small side.  We omitted the autolyse this time and just mixed everything together with a spoon and let it sit 30 minutes before the slap and folds began.

 

Even though the hydration was only 80%, the mix was still sloppy due to the Ramona Farms, spelt and black rice being in the mix.  It finally quit sticking to the counter during the 2nd of 3 sets of slap and folds 2ith the first one 8 minutes and the next 2 1 minute each.

 

We also did 3 sets of stretch and folds and each of the gluten development manipulations were done on 40 minute intervals.  The sesame seeds, sprouted Japanese rice, flax seeds, pumpkin and sunflower seeds were added during the first set of stretch and folds and they were thoroughly incorporated by the end of the 3rd set. 

 

Because of the cold we kept the dough in a SS bowl 0on a heating pad during the gluten development.  We skipped the bulk ferment and immediately shaped the dough, placed it in a rice floured basket, bagged it and retarded it for 12 hours.  After a 3 hour warm up on the heating pad, we fired up Big Old Betsy to 500 F and put in the Mega Steam.

 

We upended the basket on parchment on a peel, slashed it and slid I on the bottom stone for 20 minutes of steam at 450 F.  We then removed the steam, turned the oven down to 425 F convection and continued baking another 25 minutes until the temperature read 208 F wj=hen the oven was turned off the bread left on the stone till it hit 210 F and was removed to a cooling rack.

 

The dough bloomed and sprang well under steam, became a  deep mahogany color and smelled seedy in a good way.  We like everything about it so far and hope the crumb is a as nice when we slice it for breakfast toast in the morning,  The crumb wasn't as open as the same bread without all the add in seeds and black Japanese rice sprouts but it was open enough not to be too dense. We thought that the YW woild do a better job of opening the crumb but we thought Lucy would be a decent bread baking apprentice too:-)

The crumb is just full of good tasting seeds and now we wish we wouldn't have forgotten the aromatic ones.  In any event, this is a fine tasting bread and will be perfect with just about any kind of meal this week.  It is a welcome change from the no added bits in the crumb  breads we have been making of late.  Lucy reminds us that she is really going to be watching us bread people this year to pick her breads of the year for 2015!

 

Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

6 Week Retarded Rye Sour Starter

8

0

0

8

1.26%

83% Extraction Whole & Sprouted

25

0

10

35

5.52%

17% Extract Whole & Sprouted

8

16

22

46

7.26%

Yeast Water

25

0

0

25

3.94%

Water

8

16

32

56

8.83%

Total

74

32

64

170

22.87%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

85

13.41%

 

 

 

Water

85

13.41%

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour

13.41%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

83% Extract Sprouted & Whole Grain

232

36.59%

 

 

 

KA Bread Flour

317

50.00%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

549

86.59%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

12

1.89%

 

 

 

Water

423

66.72%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

77.05%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

634

 

 

 

 

Water

508

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration with Starter

80.13%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,354

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

50.00%

 

 

 

 

% Sprouted Grain

25.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flax & Sesame Seeds

60

9.46%

 

 

 

Sunflower & Pumpkin Seeds

120

18.93%

 

 

 

Sprouted Japanese Black Rice

20

3.15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 Whole and sprouted grains include equal amounts of Pima Club, Sonoran

 

White, Black Japanese rice, rye, spelt, emmer (farro), Kamut and wheat

 

Half the whole grains were sprouted

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah bakes bread's picture
Sarah bakes bread

interesting pic of internal gluten structure of french bread dough

My french bread dough developed a large bubble on its top surface and when it burst this is what was under the bubble skin. Shows the wonderful network of gluten strands.

Arjon's picture
Arjon

Calculating hydration % when using a soaker or porridge

I'm not clear on how to calculate what the hydration % is when a recipe includes soaker or porridge. For example, if I use 500 gm of flour and 350 gm of water, it's 70%. NP so far.

But what if I add 200 gm of soaker or porridge that is made up of 100 gm water plus 100 gm grain? 

I still have the same 500 gm of flour, but now have 450 gm total of water. So is the hydration still 70% or is it now 90%? Or do I have to weigh how much of the soaker water hasn't been absorbed by the grain, then add just that weight to get the total water weight to use in hydration %? Or something else entirely? 

Or am I just unclear about something that doesn't matter enough to worry about? 

Abelbreadgallery's picture
Abelbreadgallery

Happy new baking year

a_warming_trend's picture
a_warming_trend

A North Carolina Perspective

Well, I guess now is as good a time as any to introduce myself! 

I've only been baking bread since this past summer, but I've pretty much fallen in love. I started with flatbreads, moved on to no-knead breads with commercial yeast, discovered preferments...then I embarked on the process of raising two sourdough cultures (one with rye flour, one will all-purpose). It was an emotional rollercoaster, but I now maintain and bake with both. I know that most serious home bakers don't keep two, but I just can't shake the feeling that they're each contributing something unique to my bread-making. I'll probably get over intuition, but it's fun to indulge it for now.

I have so many thoughts and questions about a range of subjects: levain percentage, autolyse, hydration level, retarding, shaping, temperature at various stages...

For this post, I'll just include some photos of recent loaf exploits (although I'm sure I won't upload them correctly the first time and will have to edit...apologies in advance).

I hope to make a first "real" post in the next few days, documenting a controlled experiment in long cold bulk ferment vs. long cold proof (holding all other variables constant). 

Thanks to all of you for maintaining such a great venue for bread talk!

 

 

 

 

icrt's picture
icrt

Commercial Pita Help

Hello,

I'm working on a commercial pita bread recipe for a restaurant. My biggest challenge is achieving a consistent pocket in the dough. By consistent, I mean that A) it exists, and B) it is an even thickness between the top and bottom layers of the dough. Our goal is for the pita to be the best pita in the world in that it is wheaty, soft, robust, and satisfying.

We plan on baking the bread in a Woodstone Pita oven, and have been practicing with the oven set somewhere between 550 and 590 degrees. We're mixing in a Hobart Stand mixer and are using an Erika 7/70 Dough Divider to portion and shape. Then, we're using a Somerset Dough press to flatten the dough immediately before baking. Again, my biggest challenge is getting even pockets with each and every pita bread, which we plan on baking 225 - 300 every day.

Here is the recipe:

  • 3333 oz. / 2 tsp. yeast (Red-Star Active Dry
  • 2 # Water (90 degrees F)
  • 1# 10 oz. Bread Flour (King Arthur)
  • 1# 10 oz. Whole-Wheat Flour (King Arthur)
  • 4.75 oz. Vital Wheat Gluten (King Arthur)
  • 1.5 oz. Salt
  • 7 oz. Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Process:

  1. Add water and yeast to a mixing bowl with a dough hook and mix on low speed until the yeast is fully dissolved.
  2. With the mixer still on low speed, add Bread Flour, Whole-Wheat Flour, VWG, and Salt. Wait 45 seconds for the flour to being to hydrate, then add EVOO in a slow drizzle until fully incorporated.
  3. Mix 7 - 8 minutes.
  4. Stop the mixer. Cover with plastic wrap, and let rise for 20 minutes.
  5. Flatten the dough ball onto the shaping tray for the Erika dough divider. Use the machine to portion and shape the dough balls. Place into a proofing tray, cover with a lid, and rest in the walk-in cooler overnight.
  6. Set Somerset press to 150 degrees. Oil the top and bottom platen. Place three dough balls into the machine and press until .25 inch thick and 5.5 inches in diameter.
  7. Place shaped pita onto mesh, aluminum trays and put into Woodstone oven. Bake for 3 - 4 minutes, rotating halfway through to avoid scorching the pita in spots.

Right now, I can't tell if I should be adding more yeast to ensure a better rise, especially with the overnight proof. We're convinced that making a large batch of dough in the evening, letting it rest, and then baking it first-thing in the morning is the best way to get consistent results.

 

I'll respond to answers as I'm sure you'll have questions after reading. Thanks so much for the help in advance!

 

-s

Cher504's picture
Cher504

Yeast Water question

Today I made these Rustic durum baguettes [formula was posted by isand88] with my yeast water made from concord grapes. They were a hit! Here's some photos

They were difficult to score and maneuver, but they still bloomed nicely in the oven. My first attempt at baguettes! And my second bake using the yeast water - the first one was a 1,2,3 loaf that had a noticeable hint of grape aroma and flavor...so awesome!

I have a question about using the yeast water in general - I'm planning to bake the 75% whole wheat levain bread from FWSY. If anyone is familiar with the Forkish formulas, this is one of his hybrid loaves. It's basically a sourdough bread but it calls for a scant 1/2 tsp of yeast in the final dough. I was thinking about using yeast water instead since it helps with moisture and a more open crumb. So how much yeast water should I use? The entire dough is a little over 1800g, and it has 360g of levain. Would I use the yeast water in place of part of the water in the dough? Or should I mix it with a small portion of the flour and make a kind of yeast water slurry? 

Happy Holidays to everyone - I've been drooling over all the holiday baking posts. What a wonderful community this is!

 

Cheers!

Cherie

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

50 Percent Whole Grain 25 Percent Sprouted 9 Grain SD with Whey

We took another step down the sprouted grain trail this week, even after vowing not too, when we decided to defrost the chest freezer and found a peanut butter jar full of frozen whey in the bottom of the icy depths near the bottom-  along with too many quarter hunks of bread.

 

Other changes this week are that we reduced the amount of levain to 10%, changed the 3 slap and fold sessions to 4, 2 and 1 minute keeping the 3 following stretch and folds the same.  This weeks whole and sprouted grains were a 9 grain mix of emmer, spelt, rye, wheat, einkorn, oat, Desert Durum, Kamut and barley.

 

We did not retard the 3 stage levain for 24 hours, like we normally would and we did not retard the shaped loaves for 12 hours as normal either.  We decided to try a bulk 12 hour retard followed by 2 hours of warm up in the heating pad and then a 2 hour final proof in the basket, also on the heating pad.

 

We used the oval bottom of the MagnaWare, Magnalite aluminum turkey roaster for a cloche over the bread and stone this week instead of the bottom of a thick round aluminum pot.

 

We did 18 minutes under steam at 450 F after preheating to 500 F and then did 15 at 425 F convection to finish if off uncovered and baked it to 205 F instead of the our usual 210 F for sprouted grain bread.

 

This one puffed itself up and sprang mightily under steam and cracked between the 3 slashes as well as blooming at the slash.  It baked up the beautiful mahogany color we love so much. It didn’t blister much as the last 3 sprouted grain bakes but it was nicely crisp as it came out of the oven.  It also smelled fantastic when it came out of the oven.

 

We won’t get to cut it for taste and crumb inspection till later but we think it will be similar to the last 3 bakes based on spring and bloom.  The Holidays have been pleasantly uneventful, calm, stress free and cheerful this year.

 

We have my daughter’s boy friend staying with us and we got to do some fishing on the lake but got skunked first time out.   Cousin Jay also joined us for Christmas Eve prime rib dinner.   Our daughter made the salad, sides and rolls this year – yea!

The crumb came out much tighter than we had hoped but exactly the way it always comes out when we bulk retard for 12 hours, let it warm up for 2 hours and then shape and proof.   The crumb is always more open when we shape adn then retard for 12 hours and let the basketed dough warm up on the counter for 1 and a half hours before baking.  Working he dough again to shape right before baking 2 hours later really makes the crumb tight.  The taste was similar even though this bake had an extra 2 hours of time on the counter on the heating pas after gluten development

Another batch of chocolate rugelach and the prime rib before roasting

 

Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

4 Week Retarded Rye Sour Starter

8

0

0

8

1.33%

83% Extraction Whole & Sprouted

0

0

27

27

4.50%

17% Extract Whole & Sprouted

8

16

5

29

4.83%

Water

8

16

32

56

9.33%

Total

24

32

64

120

20.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

60

10.00%

 

 

 

Water

60

10.00%

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour

10.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

83% Extract Sprouted & Whole Grain

242

40.33%

 

 

 

KA Bread Flour

298

49.67%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

540

90.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

12

2.00%

 

 

 

Whey

450

75.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

83.33%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

600

 

 

 

 

Whey & Water 56

510

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration with Starter

85.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,122

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

50.33%

 

 

 

 

% Sprouted Grain

25.17%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9 Whole and sprouted grains include equal amounts of

 

 

 

oat, barley, einkorn, rye, spelt, emmer (Hayden farro), Kamut, Desert Durum and wheat.

 

Half the whole grains were sprouted

 

 

 

 

 

 

varda's picture
varda

A year in bread

A year ago, I decided to close down my little bake to order business, and see what else I could cook up.   I got my wholesale license, and into a pretty decent market, and set out to make a lot of bread.   A lot of bread all depends where you are coming from.   I'm baking out of my kitchen with fairly small equipment and it sure seems like a lot to me.    I picked up several wholesale customers, and just when I think I have that under control, I bake for a big market, all semblance of control vanishes, and I just bake as much and as fast as I can.  

In the meantime, I added a business partner (aka life saver) and the two of us hunt for the mythological rental that will allow us to expand from micro to small, shop for the equipment we hope to be able to buy once we find the rental and so forth.  

But that's just business.   The main thing is the bread.

Flaxseed Rye, Multigrain Cranberry and Durum Levain

Multigrain Sunflower Seed

Borodinsky Rye

 

New York Rye

Cherry Boule

Challot

Challah Rolls and...

Cardamom Buns

Oh, and I forgot the baguettes - 

Best wishes for a Happy New Year!

Varda

 

 

zacho's picture
zacho

Tips for a new brotform user

Hi all,

I just received a couple of beautiful oval brotform proofing baskets as a Christmas gift. I have never used one before and would love any tips or suggestions for a first time user. 

Thanks!

 

Zacho

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